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i appreciate the reply   on 223 vs 22-250 my next ? may seem funny but i'm very new to reloading and finding brass for my 45\70 got a little harder. what if any is the pros and cons to using nickle over brass cartridges and do you need to full size new cartridges and should you use a nickle primer in a nickle case vice verse in brass
 

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Hi Idlco,
     I agree with Kevin that the .223's the way to go- you'll never look back. As far as nickel goes- I don't think it makes a great deal of difference. I've only used it in .357. I believe the only purpose of nickel plating is to improve corrosion resistance, which for most applications is a moot point. If you are going to carry your cartridges in a leather belt for a long period of time (ie YEARS) the nickel is better. The color of the primer makes no difference. Just use the proper type- large rifle in your 45-70- from whatever manufacturer is available to you.
       And finally, yes it's a good idea to full length size your new brass before loading. It trues the case up and removes any dents that can occur in new brass. Hope this helps!      ID
 

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I once read a thought on nickel.
  It made me think....   When some of the nickel comes off, and slides down your barrel along with your bullet, what damage is this doing?
Nickel is much harder than the copper or lead.  

I also don’t see a great deal of benefit from it either.


         Scout.
 

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I use nickled Speer and Federal cases in .44 magnum. The cases clean very easily (especially if you don't have a tumbler) and they just look great!
 

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One overlooked benefit of "nickel"-plated cases is that they are a little easier to find in the grass.  So... I rate them as quite useful in the .45 auto, less so in other cartridges.

A point... it is doubtful that any of them are 'nickel' anymore - most likely cadmium (don't know if I spelled that right).  In either case, the plating makes quite a bond on the base metal (brass) at the molecular level and would be unlikely to come off very easily.  A few bits and pieces most likely wouldn't cause much bore wear.

Supposably the plated cases are more brittle.  I'll note that I have a plated .357 case that has a neck crack after only a couple of reloads, but this is hardly a valid conclusion based on only one case.  Still.... makes me wonder.

Food for thought.
 

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With my hot .44 mag reloads the nickled cases seem to be holding up as well, maybe a little better, as the plain brass cases (Hornady and Starline).

(Edited by Stranger at 10:39 pm on Sep. 25, 2001)
 

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I have found no real advantage to using nickled cases.  The nickle cases are harder than brass one and makes forming cartridges a bit harder.  I have found a slight reduction in case capacity in the nickle cases as opposed to the brass ones.  I've gone back to buying brass brass and will leave the nickle alone.
 

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Well... One of the main reasons (besides cosmetics) the ammo manufacturers use nickel brass for premium loadings is their surface hardness. The nickel surface is harder than nekkid brass, this allows the cases to chamber more smoothly, more quickly, with less danger of the case hanging up in the process. So nickel cases inprove feeding reliability. Also, nickel resists corrosion, and the weakened cases that result from it. It also looks cool, which is all most people care about (sadly). And thirdly, silver cases look different (shhh... big secret here), and usually identify premium loadings, visually. Personally, I could care less about the looks, but nickel cases are one of the things that make premium factory "premium". I don't like to reload nickel pistol brass because it looks kinda shabby after 2-3 loadings. But when it's new, it really looks cool...
 

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33 years of loading and the only difference that I have seen between nickel and brass is the do not tarnish as bad as brass.  As to nickel flakes going down the barrel, maybe true that it is harder than lead or copper, but it is still a ####-of-a-lot softer than steel.  Don't worry about it.  If you want to use it, do so and don't worry about it.  Also, it isn't true that the nickel cases will dull your case trimmer.  I've been using the same Lyman non-carbide cutter Universal case trimmer for 32 years, and just replaced the factory cutter for the first time last year, and there's been a pot full of nickel cases trimmed over those 32 years.
 

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I have several nickel plated cases, all handgun rounds, that have varying degrees to flaking. The worst has lost perhaps 30% of its plating. I agree with the poster who said it makes it harder to resize the cartridges. And finally, in my experience, nickled cases show mouth splits much faster than straight brass using the same loads.

So you can probably guess I don't use them anymore if possible.
 

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I've noticed that new Hornady brass is highly polished and looks great. Does anyone else make revolver brass that looks that good when new?
 

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This point will not likely be of any importance to most shooters but may help someone out. For anyone familiar with the Blaser R-93 straight pull bolt action rifle, you will notice that the bolt does not cam into locking position by rotation but has an expanding collet that locks directly into the barrel. Because extraction of spent cases is not aided by this camming action in this design, the chamber naturally must be cut slightly oversize. This results in case expansion sufficient to result in dramatically shortened case life. The cure- nickeled cases. Case expansion is normal with the stronger nickeled brass and case life is equal to standard brass. Any time I want a "hot" reload, I opt for the nickeled case if available.
 

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If you are shooting 223 in an AR-15, the nickeled brass is easier to separate from the wolf non reloadable everyone else is shooting.

I believe in my 45/70 that the nickeled brass has a higher lubricity so if you don't get enough case lube on you are less likely to get a stuck case.

Since teh 45/70 is straight cased, I wish someone would market a carbide sizer die.

If shooting oversized cast, you have to bell your cases more to get the bullets in, and move it back more for teh crimp.  THis in may opinion wears out nickeled brass quicker than non.

Just my experiences
 
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