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New scope, mounted okay, but sight picture seems wonky, with head movement causing target to move accordingly, in relation to reticule. At 100 yds., this would allow about 12" diameter of error as I move my head around.

I don't think parallax comes into it, as the scope has no parallax adjustment, just the power, windage and elevation, and focus.

Somebody please tell me the fix for this, before I start leaving my "review" all over the Internet. Nikon seems ready to accept it back for warrantee replacement, but I don't even know if its a bum item or the whole product line has this problem.
 

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The Troll Whisperer (Moderator)
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Hopefully, this doesn't happen at the 1x setting, as you should have a full field of view at that setting. If at the 4X setting, move your head forward until you have a full field of view in the scope. If you can't do that because of stock length, try to get an even amount of black around the view with the crosshairs centered.
 

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I think there is some "parallax" adjustment...so to speak. I can't remember if I read this in the forums or in one of my scope's instructions, but here's what I do on all new scopes:

Before mounting the scope on the rifle, take a narrow box (like maybe the scope box) and cut two v-notches across from one another. (I suppose this could be done on the rifle too, if you have lapped the rings [so they don;t scratch the scope tube] and the rings are loose. It's the same principal - you just need something that will hold the scope and allow you to turn it back and forth). Lay the scope in the notches and sight on a "target" object about 60 to 75 yards out. Gently rotate the scope 180 degrees and see where the crosshairs are now hitting. Using your elevation and windage screws, keep adjusting the scope and checking both positions until, no matter how you rotate it, the crosshairs align at the same spot on your "target". I never got one to be exact (I've done four now), but within an inch or so is close enough.

Now, you can mount the scope on your rifle, boresight it, and zero it it. Also, make sure your bases and rings are aligned. If they're not, just cranking down on the scope rings might torque the tube enough to throw things way off.

I can;t speak for the Monarch, except to say it's highly respected wherever I've read about end-users reporting on it. My only Nikkon is a Buckmaters 6-18x40, and I'm very pleased with it, to say the least. It took me about 20 minutes or so to get the "parallax" adjusted using the above-mentioned procedure. When adjusting the windage and elev screws, it's back-ashwards, and takes alot of experimenting to get the scope adjusted so the crosshairs will align at the same spot during any rotation of the scope.
 

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I have the same scope mounted on a Marlin 1895/45-70. I mounted it using mid power (2.5X) as my eye relief guide, figuring if needing quick target acquisition and shot, it would be needed at close range/low power. The scope sighted in easily with positive adjustments and handled the fairly stiff recoil of the LE factory ammo without a hiccup. It shoots under MOA on this rifle, with this load. For the record, I also have three of the very similar Nikon Monarch UCC SG model 1.5-4.5x20 a VERY similar scope, sold at almost exactly the same price. I am more than happy with all four of these scopes and think them a better value than any similar Leupold short of the Leupold Euro 30mm 1.25-4x20, which is a very impressive scope with a bit bigger "eyebox" that retails at discount scope sites for $400.
 
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