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What is a good FAQ or other source to look at to look at the various steps involved in developing a wildcat?

At the very least I suspect it will involve pushing back part of the shoulder to increase caliber and probably neck reaming.

TIA.
 

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Get a book on wildcats. My favorite is Ken Howell's, which I believe is called something like "Custom Cartridges." It's a wonderful reference.
 

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What is a good FAQ or other source to look at to look at the various steps involved in developing a wildcat?

At the very least I suspect it will involve pushing back part of the shoulder to increase caliber and probably neck reaming.

TIA.
One usually does not wildcat for the sake of wildcatting. Usually a person has something in mind before they start spending a butt load of money for kicks and giggles.
What is your goal?
What is your caliber?
What action do you want to use?

If you answered "I don't know" to any of these then you are thrown into the abyss.

For instance, I just did a .358 HDH (.358 WSSM).
My goal was a semi-auto Indiana deer legal medium to long range round equalling the .358 Winchester.
Caliber is restricted to minimum .358 diameter, and case length no longer than 1.625 inch-Indiana state law for legal deer hunting rifle caliber.
I wanted to use a LR-308 semi-auto platform.
What parent case to use? The LR-308 already has a bolt available for the magnum sized head, and I wanted a case easily formed. Logical choice, the WSSM line. I went with the 25 WSSM and chose to keep it simple with a simple necking up to .358 caliber, no reaming, no case forming other than expanding, and no fire forming. Since it was being used in an autoloader I needed a shallow shoulder angle so kept the standard 30* along with original body taper, and shoulder location.
Next step was to get a reamer made by Manson Reamers.
Once designed, while the reamer was being made, I had the specs sent to CH-4D for the dies to be made.
Then I purchased the barrel blank and assembled all parts and sent them to Marty for barrel turning and chambering.
When it came back, I put it together and am ready for load workup.

Sometimes, depending on goal, you expand up, or size down, blow out or move the shoulder, neck ream or trim back. It all depends on what you want to do and how you want to do it.
 
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