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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Has any member had personal experience in shooting the new model Norinko ? Published reviews in the usual gun magazines from time to time recommended real "dogs".

Specifically, occasional use as a ranch rifle for off the shoulder( low power scope) under 100yds. Use by different female persons.

Likely a shortening of the stock will be necessary.


Georgvus
 

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Georgvus,

Welcome to the forum. Rules are to join in, have fun, and play nicely with the rest of us kids.

I'll move your post over to the rifle forum where it will likely garner more opinions. I have no experience with that Norinco, personally, (Norinco got locked out of exporting to the US over much of the last decade) but I can say the .223 has proven to be an excellent ranch rifle chambering. One reason is, whether cutting down stocks or barrels or replacing a stock with a flyweight synthetic, there's really no such thing as making a .223 too light because its recoil is so mild.


P.S. I took a look at the rifle specs. The 6.3 lb weight (approximate because the density of wood is a variable) is good. The Monte Carlo stock cheek piece may get under foot if you intend to have it in a saddle holster. The barrel twist is 12". That is too slow for many heavy .224 bullets and even for some lighter bullets that are long shaped. But bullets that are flat base or blunt nosed will be OK. If you can find the bullet length for ammunition you are considering using, multiply the weight of the bullet in grains times 0.0052 and add 0.455 to it to get close to the maximum length in inches that a bullet should be for your 12 inch .224 twist.

Back before the import ban, a friend of mine had a Norinco M14 copy, and after he bedded the action, it shot just fine. So there is no reason I can think of that the rifle might not be good for what you want it to do? An inexpensive rifle like that may benefit from some inletting and bedding. If you read up on it, you can do a credible job with ordinary, slow setting, filled epoxy from the hardware store, using furniture paste wax as the mold release. (The specialty materials are not really required for a light recoiling gun; some argue they aren't really required for a heavier gun, either.)
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Norinco 223

Your reply was most helpful . The i in 12 twist. looks like it is best with 45-50gr. We load 55-63gr at starting intensity levels. This gives good penetration for day to day occupational off the shoulder shots. This is important to us. There is no time for stalking to obtain the ideal shot. One must also be also prepared for a quick second shot. Winchester bulk 55gr SP give, for us, the reduced expansion and greater penetration. Looks as if it will be a CZ or a Ruger lightweight.

Nuw we have another discussion thread clip magazines vs integral
 

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I may have left too disparaging an impression of the 12" twist. As a target shooter, my idea of long, heavy bullets are in the 70 to 90 grain range. The .222 Remington normally has a 14" twist, and that let it dominate benchrest shooting 50 years ago, shooting 50 grain flat base bullets. The 12' twist is what our military M16's used originally, and if you use my simple formula you will see the 0.755" long 63 grain Sierra Varminter fits within the length limit just fine. It has a flat base. The boattail 60 grain Sierra at 0.778" is a tad long in my formula. It won't be outright unstable, though, it just won't shoot to peak accuracy as the shorter 63 could. The 0.9" long 69 grain boattail MatchKing would be outright unstable with the 12" twist.

Personally, I think the 9" twist our military moved to from the 12" twist is more broadly useful. It will let you shoot the 77 grain Sierra MatchKings, which I like. But the military also has to worry about keeping bullets stable in very low temperature conditions, where air is more dense. I shoot 80 grain VLD bullets in my AR, but it has 7 1/2" twist. It is too fast for best accuracy with light bullets.

The bottom line is, if you aren't going to use bullets heavier than 63 grains and aren't going to shoot them at below freezing temperatures, the 12" twist will likely serve your purposes well.


On your other topic:

Removable magazines offer the best loading speed for volume fire as long as you don't lose them. A belt pouch or a butt stock pouch for spares are good ways to keep them handy, but you'd better have at least one spare. If you are not going to fire more than a couple of shots at a time, though, the practice Jeff Cooper taught at Gunsite was to keep spare rounds in your pocket that you used to top up the box magazine at every pause in the action. That works fine.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 · (Edited)
unclenick,

Finally, the closure of this thread. Today i have ordered a Stevens model 200 in .223.This was on the recommendation of others in the district who use as a working rifle on a daily basis.One distant neighbour is a keen target shooter and hunter so I regard his recommendation as accurate.

A competent local gunsmith has a Savage barrel wrench. Thus, I am considering having the barrel shortened to either 20 or 18inch for ease of vehicle ingress and egress.

I also use a Mini-14 and load on a progressive press with 4198 class burning rate powders. This load would also be for the Stervens.

150 yds would be a very long shot for us day or night.What would suggest velocity drop /inch of barrel be for medium intensity loads.

Any recommendation on heavier than 55gr.Within limits projectile weight beats velocity for for quick shots that are not ideal.
 

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Always had good luck shooting pigs out here with Sierra's 63gn semi point from a .223. Good penetration for a small projectile.
 
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