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I picked up a box of accubond long rang 190gr .308 bullets the other day and the box has operating velocity of 1300fps and above for expansion which is pretty impressive. I’m wondering what new design or “technology” they are using on these?
Most bullets need around 1800fps. I’ve got some 200gr ftx .358s that Hornady says will expand down to 1600fps but they look to have 6 vertical cuts in the jacket to aid expansion.
 

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One point to consider is what does the maker actually mean by “expansion”. In some cases expansion just means that the mushroom exceeds bullet diameter, so an “expanded” .264” bullet could have a mushroom diameter of .275”. That’s “expansion” alright, but not particularly meaningful.


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The cynic in me says they used a computer to write the advertisements and thin jackets to make the bullets. One or both of them may work out. ;)
 

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The Shadow
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Carpe is on the right trail, define "expansion"...
I like a bunch of Nosler bullets, but let's be honest with one another. If Nosler was known to be upright with their marketing claims, they wouldn't have become the laughing stock for BC claims; or had to resort to paying the NM school of mines to verify their work.

Generally want tipped bullet will work at lower velocities than Non. But if there is a huge difference, what that tells you is the bullet is soft. Meaning splatter city at high velocity. The newer generation of Hornady bullets are that way as well.


Cheers
 
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That's good input, thanks guys.

The Nosler Accubonds sure look racy, and they shoot great as far as .284 and .358 bullets go but I wonder how they will hold up on a close shot. ??
 

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Elk Whisperer (Super Moderator)
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Augustuz, you didn't say what you're running them in or initial velocity.

Looking at sectioned AB's and AB Long-range bullets, they look "the same".

I've been shooting AB's in my 300RUM for several years with pretty good success (3274 fps muzzle vel.) but when the velocity gets down to say 2500 or below they seem to pencil through whereas shots under 250 yards where velocity is still an estimated 3100(?) they REALLY expand and elk we DRT but at 460 yards they pencil through and dead elk need several perforations to die.

I prefer the Swift Scirroco II's myself opting to leave the all copper bullets at the store. Even the new ones (ttsx, etc) are way over rated IMO.

RJ
 

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The Hog Whisperer (Administrator)
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I'm thinking the 'splat' factor may be pretty high if they really will start expanding at 1,300fps. Don't hit anything you want to eat..... :eek:
 

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LOTS of testing of the ABLR (and earlier AB) at the 24hour campfire forums.
 

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I've had great luck with elk and regular ole Accubonds. 200 and over 500 yards. Good but not excessive damage , exits and dead elk. They shoot great to boot. Better than my old bones can hold!
 

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I'm thinking the 'splat' factor may be pretty high if they really will start expanding at 1,300fps. Don't hit anything you want to eat..... :eek:
I'm thinking my Sierra, Hornady, and Speer cup and core bullets might just continue to work.
 
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I suspect from the internal design that the larger Ballistic tip and deeper than needed cavity below combined with a high caliber ogive which weakens a bullets mechanical strenght in that area all combine to help it have some expansion at that quoted velocity BUT it all depends on what target material it strikes as to how it may or may not perform at a certain velocity . Also it may not be bonded all the way to the ballistic tip which could give it another weaker spot to expand faster .
 

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Carpe is on the right trail, define "expansion"...
I like a bunch of Nosler bullets, but let's be honest with one another. If Nosler was known to be upright with their marketing claims, they wouldn't have become the laughing stock for BC claims; or had to resort to paying the NM school of mines to verify their work.

Generally want tipped bullet will work at lower velocities than Non. But if there is a huge difference, what that tells you is the bullet is soft. Meaning splatter city at high velocity. The newer generation of Hornady bullets are that way as well.


Cheers
Yep, pretty much
 
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