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**Not a reloader yet.....learned the hard way that my gun doesn’t like soft points. **

I can see how you might think that, since you polished the feed ramps. Does that mean your Freedom Munitions remanufactured ammo is sticking at the feed ramps?

It could be Freedom Munitions remanufactured using US military surplus brass from a machine gun range. Machine gun range brass is the most abundant source of range brass in 7.62 GI brass these days, and machine gun chambers are usually generously cut for reliability. The cases are probably generously swelled, and could be slow coming off the magazine feed lips.

Go back and read post #19 by HarrySS. All you really know is that your gun doesn’t like Freedom Munitions remanufactured ammo.
 

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Discussion Starter #42
It's all Lake City brass. When it jams the round does not not enter the chamber. Just lays there crosswise. I've had several times that it will feed ok for 2 or 3 rounds then jams again. It shoots PMC fmj just fine. I've thought about filing off the lead tip to see what that does.
 

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Does the first round chamber every time? If the first round always chambers, it might be the powder charge is what the rifle doesnt like. Hard to find the problem from a distance.

Lyman has the"AR Reloading Handbook" with lots of info on the loads for the 308 Winchester.

I bought some military brass for the 308. After full length sizing, it would not fit in a Ruger M77 chamber. I has to use the regular FL sizer and then use a Small Base sizer to get it to chamber. After it was fired, it worked with just the SB sizer. I would avoid buying fired military brass.

For powder, I would try WW748 and Reloader 15. These always worked well for 308.

Get a chamber gauge. For the AR, I would check every round.
 

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Uncle Harley-- "Just lays there cross-ways" sounds like a magazine problem to me. On ejection, the next cartridge jumps up instead of stripped off the top, or the tip is hitting something. Switch magazines and use a known 'good' load.
 

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I wonder if machine gun range brass might be a case (pun intended) where the Larry Willis **collet resizing die** could be of benefit. This has been a topic of hot discussion here, with most forum members thinking the Collet Resizing Die is without merit, and just a scam or boondoggle.

I was recently reading a thread on **achieving maximum case life** with UncleNick and others discussing resizing techniques, and resizing die dimensions and the + or — variations that occur within manufactured dies, and the + or — variations that are found among rifle chambers, and the + or — variations in new case dimensions that come from the various manufacturers.

This was a fairly technical thread with good information, and for me some concepts were clarified. I may not be able to adequately convey what UncleNick was saying in that long thread, but to LOOSELY paraphrase one concept I took from it would go like this:

**If you wanted to build an accurate rifle, and load ammunition for both precision AND maximum case life, the following steps would be beneficial toward that goal:

1. Design your custom reamer to cut a precision chamber for the ammunition you intend to produce. Your chamber neck would be precise (tight), but would allow your quality case neck to expand just enough to release the bullet easily.

2. Since there is considerable variability in the dimensions (+ or — range of accepted manufacturing tolerances) among the various new brass manufacturers, you must select a quality brand of new brass cases, which are known to produce cases with minimal variation in case wall diameter, and which closely (within .001 or .002) adhere to the precise chamber specification you have chosen.

3. You would need to have two custom sizing dies built to your specification: 1. A full length resizing die which would only reduce case wall dimension about .001 (perhaps .002?) from the fired expanded case dimension (fired in your custom chamber). 2. A neck sizing die, to provide your desired neck tension on the bullet, with the brand of quality brass you have chosen. Yes, I know precision shooters neck turn brass that is not acceptable to them.

In summary, with this system, you would be producing ammunition with a close dimensional fit to your custom chamber. Most reloading would require only neck sizing. An occasional full length resizing would only reduce case wall dimension about .001 from the expanded fired dimension. The **working of the brass** would be minimized, and the precise case to chamber fit could be the beginning for a very accurate rifle.**

The above poorly paraphrased concept is the best case scenario.

The worst case scenario might involve an oversized (loose) chamber, producing fired cases that were OVERLY expanded and difficult to properly resize...or perhaps a tight chamber that would not reliably accept reloaded (not properly resized) ammunition with excessive case dimensions.

There is an abundance of 7.62 range brass, from machine gun ranges, for sale on the **once fired** brass market. I think some of it is properly resized and processed, but it is well known that sometimes people have difficulties with machine gun brass.

I have found the controversial discussions about the **Collet Resizing Die** to be quite interesting.

I think it was UncleNick who said the Lake City brass had a very strong (hard) case head.

Perhaps the people who commercially process ** once fired military 7.62 brass** could use the collet resizing die to SAVE the mountain of used machine gun brass, and produce a mountain of quality, properly resized cases.

Perhaps overly swelled machine gun brass could be properly resized with a custom resizing die that would return it to SAMMI spec, but that would require ADEQUATE lubrication, with the necessary step of removing the lubricant from the case. It seems the collet resizing die (if I understand the principle correctly) could be adapted to commercially process the mountains of **once fired** military surplus brass, 7.62 and 5.56 and .50 BMG, with only minimal lubrication.
 

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Legolas-- Such dies could resize a hundred cases at a time in a punch press, but spent military brass is sold by train loads. VERY little ever gets re-sized by anybody, but maybe Ed Dillon. ;)

Lubrication would be needed but for the collet closer, not the case.
 

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The collet die was invented to handle belted cases, not rimless. A 'push through' die will work just fine to resize the case just above the head. Those exist for pistol cartridges, but I'm not sure about rifle cartridges. However they wouldn't be difficult to build. All you need is a good piece of steel threaded the same as a sizing die, with a hole though the middle for the desired size. And some GOOD case lube! (one-stuck need not apply here).

Carbide would make it even easier, with a slight increase in cost.
 

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You are having waaayy too much trouble with this rifle. Is it possible you have a home built AR? If so I think you should get your money back.
 

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The problem I am having is a failure to feed in my ar308. The ammo is Freedom Munitions SPBT 150gr factory reman. . . .
Since RCBS recommends small base dies for ARs, I would suspect Freedom Munitions remanufactured your ammunition using standard .308 dies meant for bolt action rifles and the slight difference in dimensions is showing up as failure to feed from the magazine. If you've fired factory ammunition loaded with all new components and experienced no problems, it's a strong suggestion not to fire remanufactured ammunition in your AR. It's been my experience that remanufactured ammunition uses cases from all manufacturers without exception. If your rifle has a tight chamber, it may not like remanufactured ammunition.
 

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The problem I am having is a failure to feed in my ar308. The ammo is Freedom Munitions SPBT 150gr factory reman. After I found a 308AR forum they said this is a typical problem for the ar type rifles. I took the rifle apart & polished the feed ramps & got rid of the sharp edges on the lugs around the ramps but still a no go for reliable feeding. I bought some 147 gr fmj & it worked flawlessly. The spbt fired & ejected just fine. But won't feed worth a darn. I guess I'll have to fire them one at a time & make sure it's not jamming.
Try a different manufacture made ammo. See if it helps.
 
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