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I have been practicing off hand with my 1894 and I am finding out a few things. Just wanted to run this by you experienced guys to get your take.

I am using the charging dangerous game, game , for practice. You shoot one shot at each of three targets that are placed at 30 20 and 10 yds. The first shot is at the 30 then 20 then 10. It's a lot of fun and I am working up some speed but I have stopped to improve my accuracy.

Here is what I have found.

I have to take a 6 oclock hold at the bottom of the black on the 30 yd. Still a 6 oclock hold but on the  bullseye for the 20 yd. and then cover the bull for the 10 yd. Is this the way to do it or do I need to adjust my sights or my sight picture. I don't want to get to far doing something fundamentally wrong and then have to change.

The same hold for the 30 seems to work good out to 50 and further if I can do my part.
 

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I have been out of the loop a bit, but I guess 1894 would be a marlin lever action, I have a 44 magnum marlin lever around here that does not get out enough.

How you are placing it on your shoulder may be the problem.  The problem could also get into your eyes, head tilt and other stuff.

I have no dominant eye, so I shoot both right and left handed using different eyes.  I can not line the rifle up the same because of the angle it is coming from or something.

If I want to be great, I must zero from one side and keep it there.  To be good with both sides I average it and adjust a bit depending on side.  I call this kentucky windage as I never heard anyone define kentucky windage.

The same goes for handguns.  If I set up perfect for one side the other side needs kentucky windage.

This is hard to figure out, but I looked at how I was shouldering the stock one day.  I do work out and try to keep both sides of my body equal in muscle mass, but I have one side stronger than the other for most everything.  This affects shouldering the rifle and I just live with it.

Sounds to me like you are close enough for rough work as judging exact distance is hard.  Run some further ranges out and see what happens.

I must clarify, I am no expert, have been to no classes.  I read a lot on the net and read a lot of books on stuff.  I am pretty much self taught with firearms.  But I now live near a good class and will attend it when I get some money together.
 

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The Hog Whisperer (Administrator)
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Chief,

Yes at short range the sights are going to pretty well cover up the target, due to the sights being higher than the bore.  If you've ever shot skeet, the #7 and #8 targets are like that, so close that you cover them up with the muzzle and fire.  If you can see them when you fire you'll miss them for sure.

At 10 yards, I'm not so sure that you even have to see the sights real clearly.  Seems to me at that range it's pretty well point and shoot, especially with a rifle.  Kind of look through the front sight like it was a shotgun bead but really focus on the target.

Haven't shot any dangerous critters at moving at short range, other than a few clay targets, so take it for what it's worth.
 

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Chief RID, Your hold sounds correct. Mine is about the same. If you are hitting your targets then you are fine For off hand shooting practice I used to belong to a gun club that had pin shooting matches for long guns as well as hand guns. This was excellent practice for engaging targets quickly at close range. The shooting club that I am currently a member of has lever action silouwet(Iknow I spelled that wrong) matches that are shot off hand at distances from 50 to 200yrds. The m-94 Winchester being the most comonly used rifle. Check out a shooting club neer you and see what thay offer for the kind of shooting your interested in. Best of luck.     Eric
 

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A ghost ring rear sight will help speed and accuracy on close range shooting. You don't really have to line up the sights because your eye picks up the center of the rear sight and you just put the front sight on the target.
Stock fit also makes a difference. The pro hunters in Africa generaly have their rifles fitted like a custom shotgun so that it naturally comes up with the sights aligned.
 
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