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Hey forum,

New poster, but ive been reading on and off for a few years.

As the title suggests, I recently purchased a Colt Cobra. Its not one of the new production ones from the last few years. I think Colt's website said it was a 1972 Agent model.

The gun is in very, very good condition. It has been fired a handful of times im guessing. The bluing has worn off a little by edge of the barrel (presumably by holster wear) and there are very light wear marks on the cylinder from the catch mechanism.

I'm not looking to see how much the gun is worth, there are a million places I can do that research on my own. (I wouldnt be mad if someone posted a number, but thats not the intent of this post) I want to know if i can shoot this gun without the value going down in the tank.

Now im not much of a gun collector myself, but I know a lot of people are, which is fine, im not trashing the hobby. I just dont want to take a collector's grade firearm and wear it down. I would rather sell it for collector grade price, and then buy something shooter's grade and use the leftover money to buy ammo.

thanks in advance.
 

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I think there was the Agent, the Cobra and the Detective Special. One was an alloy frame but I disremember which. All are very good revolvers with a 100% safety record, but all are now 'collector guns' in some way because there will never again be their equal.
The alloy frame should not have +P ammo in its diet, but the others will handle +P at the cost of a shorter life span.
 

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Yes, the original Colt Cobra were alloy frame with steel barrel/cylinder/ejection rod. Fine guns, accurate. They have an extra long grip; which when combined with the light weight makes for great handling and recoil. I love mine. When the new one was announced, I got excited; was up for early purchase.

Not that the new 'version' is bad...it just ain't a Cobra. and I condemn colt for destroying a ledgend.

I shoot mine which is 98% condition. The frame is not blued, it is anodized, and can scratch so be careful. But enjoy.
 

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I was a deputy when nobody carried an auto as a duty gun. The Colt guys liked the extra round of the Det Sp. but the S&W Chief Sp was smaller and easier to hide.
 

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. I just don't want to take a collector's grade firearm and wear it down.
Collectors look at a couple aspects of use. Fired/never fired, and condition of the gun and original packaging and docs.

Once you shoot it, it makes an immediate transition in value. Without the original packing and manual, it takes another drop. Holster marks and scratches, well.

But there are quite a few collectors on a budget that will pay a reasonable sum to get below the sky high cost of a New In Box Condition.

I have guns that have seen regular use for over 40 years, and they look nearly new. Unless you are going to drag it through the mud and bushes, or maybe hammer a couple nails, it's not likely that even a thousand rounds will make much difference with careful maintenance.
 

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I shoot my mid 1950's 38 Special Trooper and it's about 99 1/2% condition. I don't beat it around or carry it in a holster, just in a pistol rug and to the range and back. I don't have the box or papers, so.....
As has been said, 'They don't make them like that anymore.' and it has one of the best single action triggers I have felt, it just 'let's go' and you don't feel it coming, what's the worn out analogy....'like breaking a glass rod'.
I have a set of Python grips that it 'wears' when it wants to 'show off'!:D
 

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