Shooters Forum banner

1 - 11 of 11 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
265 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I have an old stevens mod 77 that I bought new in 1961. It's not been used since about 1970 and was kept out in an old hen house to cull foxes.
The choke was that tight I swear you could have threaded a needle with it.
I phoned the local gun maker and he quoted a figure that was more than I gave for the gun when I bought it so I googled expanding reamers and picked up a 17 to 19 mm one for the uk equivalent of $13.
I measured and remeasured the inside diameter of the barrel at the muzzle and set the reamer to cut 0.005" which it did , I kept on at it until I'd taken 0.025" out of the muzzle which left about 0.010" of choke in the muzzle, just right for steel shot. stevens choke.JPG
There should be a picture hereabouts showing the muzzle and the reamer after the job was done. So my new choke cost me all of $13 instead of $60 and a 70 mile round trip.
I'll be out tomorrow night and see if I can harvest some mallards (greenheads?)
Oh the reason I'm doing up the old gun is my youngest boy has got the shotgun bug so he's having an early inheritance of a W&C Scott 10 gauge sbs with 3.5" chambers, a winchester mod 23 with 3" chambers and a Darne V19 game gun so I'll have the stevens and my old rem 1100 12 g and a pokey old 20 gauge to play with.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
265 Posts
Discussion Starter #2
Forgot to mention, the reamer expands enough so I can open up the choke barrel on the 10 gauge to half choke so that can use steel shot, too.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
15,094 Posts
To use an expanding reamer to best effect, make a brass bushing for the stem and use a long extension so the reamer is driven from the breech end and is advanced out the front. That keeps the choke aligned with the bore. Brake cylinder hones smooth out the radial marks.
Expandable reamers cut over their entire length and tend to catch chips that makes scratches. I held barrels vertically over a bucket and literally poured cutting oil down the barrel as the reamer was working to flush chips out the bottom.
I did a lot of that work decades ago and have a full set of expandable reamers, dent removers and other tooling.
 
  • Like
Reactions: shooter444

·
Registered
Joined
·
265 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
To use an expanding reamer to best effect, make a brass bushing for the stem and use a long extension so the reamer is driven from the breech end and is advanced out the front. That keeps the choke aligned with the bore. Brake cylinder hones smooth out the radial marks.
Expandable reamers cut over their entire length and tend to catch chips that makes scratches. I held barrels vertically over a bucket and literally poured cutting oil down the barrel as the reamer was working to flush chips out the bottom.
I did a lot of that work decades ago and have a full set of expandable reamers, dent removers and other tooling.
Sage advice, JB but the old stevens barrel is firmly attached to the receiver and I couldn't be arsed to remove it so I plugged the chamber with a trimmed wine cork and filled the barrel with old engine oil up to the foresight, damned thing still overflowed. Cleanest the barrel has been for about half a century after running some bronze brush strokes through it followed by a couple of patches.
Maybe because I took such small cuts I didn't have any radial scratches, I thought about using a hone but will try a few magazines of steel #4s to see if they polish it up.
I think the metal that formed the choke had been well work hardened as it didn't come off as curly swarf as I expected but in small chips.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
15,094 Posts
The tiny chips are the result of how a tapered reamer works. Spread some of that gray goo on a microscope slide and you see jillions of little curly chips.
Shooting a rough barrel causes 'washboard' ripples. Buy a cheap 3/4 ball hone and smooth it up before shooting. Hone with a rapid in and out motion. The little silicon carbide balls break down rapidly when used wet. It takes less than five minutes to do a good job of it.
 
  • Like
Reactions: shooter444

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
15,094 Posts
Those particular hones are called 'Flex Hones'. Several companies make them. I find them on the dollar tool table at ACE hardware but ebay is full of them.
 
  • Like
Reactions: shooter444

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
9,551 Posts
Can tell from the question...don't do a lot of opening shotgun chokes, but can see where sometimes an over-choked barrel (one made for loose shot/wads) could make use of it with modern components.

Often the cheap hone became more of a "sacrificial hone"....often ruined it on one or two jobs, but at something like $8-$12 per,could live with that.

As for putting a Jug-choke into a cut off barrel with a hone...never got a good choke better than "one step"....would turn a true cylinder into a improved cylinder, but past that it got real "iffy".

NOT that I have something against cylinder/improved cylinder for up-land game.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
15,094 Posts
When I was doing choke work, I bought Flex Hones by the dozen in three grades. They ARE sacrificial, as are the spider hones that have become more common. Silica Carbide is like that.
Choke work has evolved almost entirely to those installing screw in chokes. I'm a skeet 1 and 2 shooter and every shotgun I own is opened to about .007 and .009 constriction. (I like longer barrels to smooth out my swing and those chokes aren't factory available).

For non double guns, choke can be 'rolled' in by changing the cutter for a roller in a pipe cut-off tool.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
222 Posts
They still make brake cylinder hones?...Am all for the expanding reamer, but for smoothing.
They sure do and they work just fine for finishing after the barrel is reamed. After spending 17 years in a "prototype toolroom", with some of it doing tool & cutter grinding, the chamfer leade is what cuts on ALL reamers, not the sides. The sides hold more of a radius around 0.010 wide after O.D. grinding to size and do more to guide and the leade which has the cutting clearance on the front ends of all six flutes.
Expanding reamers are MOST used for "special reaming diameters" and when the set screw in the front end of the reamer is turned inward the front end of the reamer only expands on three (every other flute) of a six flute reamer as that's where the slits in that end will allow the reamer to expand..
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
15,094 Posts
I assumed he had the same expanding reamer I have. These expand over the whole length of the reamer because the six slots the blades ride in are tapered in relation to the body and the blades are tapered by .001 so the rear of the reamer is always .001 larger than the front.
I have a few set screw expanding chucking reamers that only cut and expand on the lead, but these are different. Either one works for choke work, of course.
 

Attachments

1 - 11 of 11 Posts
Top