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I would like to hear your opinions on these inexpensive American made and out of production guns. Are they worth their modest cost, or total junk? Mainly wondering about their .22s.
 

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Hi, Andy:
The first handgun I shot was a 922, back in the late `50s. I've got a 929 Sidekick now. They aren't bad at the right price. The 929's trigger pull is a bit rough and heavy in single action but I've seen worse in much more expensive guns. The double action pull is too heavy, period. The extractor star don't quite line up with the chambers and extracting takes a hard push on the rod with 9 loaded. The 922 did not have that problem. Accuracy is under 3" at 25 yards with ammo it likes, but 8" with one type it didn't.

Supposedly cutting a couple of coils off the mainspring fixes the double action pull, but I'm not doing that until I get a spare spring. Apparently the nylon block that's on the top end of the mainspring strut tends to break. It easy to check. Take the grips off, cock it, stick a paper clip though the hole in the bottom end of the strut, decock, and wiggle the strut and mainspring out.

Bye
Jack
 

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I have an H&R Sportsman. A 6" top break 9 shooter. I have been told that it preceeds the model 999.
The blueing is very nice, much nicer than you would expect on a gun of this type. It functions and fires just fine. And is quite accurate.
The double action trigger pull is a bit stiff but not bad. The only problem is that the trigger is groved and this tends to wear a blister after a bit.
The single action trigger pull is quite good.
I recieved the revolver as a gift several years ago and don't remember the exact price that was paid for it. But I remember thinking that it was a good price.
For the type of gun that it is, I find no fault with it.

My one problem is that I am used to 6 shot revolvers. I get to six and start to reload, then realize I still have three shots to go. Makes me feel stupid sometimes. :rolleyes:
 

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H & R Model 929 "SidekicK'

Jack Monteith said:
Hi, Andy:
The first handgun I shot was a 922, back in the late `50s. I've got a 929 Sidekick now. They aren't bad at the right price. The 929's trigger pull is a bit rough and heavy in single action but I've seen worse in much more expensive guns. The double action pull is too heavy, period. The extractor star don't quite line up with the chambers and extracting takes a hard push on the rod with 9 loaded. The 922 did not have that problem. Accuracy is under 3" at 25 yards with ammo it likes, but 8" with one type it didn't.

Supposedly cutting a couple of coils off the mainspring fixes the double action pull, but I'm not doing that until I get a spare spring. Apparently the nylon block that's on the top end of the mainspring strut tends to break. It easy to check. Take the grips off, cock it, stick a paper clip though the hole in the bottom end of the strut, decock, and wiggle the strut and mainspring out.

Bye
Jack
You mention the "nylon block" at the top of the "mainspring strut". My nylon block is cracked. Do you know of a source for a replacement ? Thank you, Ray
 

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I ran a small gunsmith shop for 27 years. After fixing a few of these I stopped taking them in for repair. If your offered one of these don't just walk away run. There are lots of good guns on the gun market these are not one of those.

You'd have to try repairing a couple to know what I'm talking about.

Certified Smith and Wesson technician
Certified Colt technician.

My 2 cents.
 

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Jack Monteith said:
Jack, Thanks for directing me to NUMRICH parts. I'm looking forward to getting the old "929 Sidekick" back on the range!
I bought the H&R 929 new back in 1965, or so, and I think it was about $29.00. (all I could afford then)
I have taught 2 sons and a grandson how to handle and shoot a revolver with it. They both have their own gun collections now but still love to shoot the old "Sidekick".
So the H&R is about 42 years old now and this is the FIRST ever problem!! That's alot of safe shooting and fun for $29.00 !! I'm ordering the parts today. Thanks again Jack
 

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The old pre-war H&R's, like the single-shot target pistols, were good guns. Other than that Nylon block, I think most of the troubles with more modern H&R's were due to sloppy manufacturing. The misalignment of Jack's extractor star is a good example. That kind of error tends to be within a normal distribution whose limits are determined by the QC standards. As a result, some will work fine and be well lined up and some won't. If you got a good one, hang on to it and keep it working.
 

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unclenick said:
Other than that Nylon block, I think most of the troubles with more modern H&R's were due to sloppy manufacturing. If you got a good one, hang on to it and keep it working.
I, too, have replaced the nylon block in my friend's H&R. Was surprised to find that material used in an area that takes so much stress.
 

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Marshal Kane said:
I, too, have replaced the nylon block in my friend's H&R. Was surprised to find that material used in an area that takes so much stress.

Been inside several of the H&R's...if yours hasn't busted that nylon block, it will. Design uses this shaped nylon block to supply the hammer rebound. Back of the hammer is shaped in a kind of a shallow, wide "V"...bolck fits into that "V"...bears on teh top while the hammer is being propelled forward, then transfers to the bottom to pull it back (rebound). Holds up pretty well, but nylon tends to get brittle with age.

The older ones have the same design, but use a metal block...they tend to break off the shaft rather than just crack. Go back farther and you'll fins som that ran without a block at all (the mainspring strut was longer, bent at the end, and shaped into a ball...the ltitle ball fit in a detent on the back of the hammer).

I have fixed them by making a new blck out of metal, drilling the block for the mainspring strut, and silver soldering it together. Have fixed others by making a new strut, ending in a ball (make it larger than the old style), and drilling the back of the ahmmer for a detent for that ball. If you make the ball end larger and with the detent placed right, will retain the rebound feature of the hammer.
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Long as I'm at it, there is one other place where the H&R's break. The hand is powered by a tiny flat spring that is attached to the hand. Diagnostic for this is that the revolver will revolve when pointed DOWN (gravity doing some of that spring's work)...occasionally revolve when pointed level...and won't revolve when pointed up.

Really is a part you should hunt up for replacement (usually the hand itself is pretty wron by the tine the spring breaks)...but if you just have to, can make a tiny spring and replace the busted one.
 

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ribbonstone said:
Been inside several of the H&R's...if yours hasn't busted that nylon block, it will. Design uses this shaped nylon block to supply the hammer rebound. Back of the hammer is shaped in a kind of a shallow, wide "V"...bolck fits into that "V"...bears on teh top while the hammer is being propelled forward, then transfers to the bottom to pull it back (rebound). Holds up pretty well, but nylon tends to get brittle with age.

The older ones have the same design, but use a metal block...they tend to break off the shaft rather than just crack. Go back farther and you'll fins som that ran without a block at all (the mainspring strut was longer, bent at the end, and shaped into a ball...the ltitle ball fit in a detent on the back of the hammer).

I have fixed them by making a new blck out of metal, drilling the block for the mainspring strut, and silver soldering it together. Have fixed others by making a new strut, ending in a ball (make it larger than the old style), and drilling the back of the ahmmer for a detent for that ball. If you make the ball end larger and with the detent placed right, will retain the rebound feature of the hammer.
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Long as I'm at it, there is one other place where the H&R's break. The hand is powered by a tiny flat spring that is attached to the hand. Diagnostic for this is that the revolver will revolve when pointed DOWN (gravity doing some of that spring's work)...occasionally revolve when pointed level...and won't revolve when pointed up.

Really is a part you should hunt up for replacement (usually the hand itself is pretty wron by the tine the spring breaks)...but if you just have to, can make a tiny spring and replace the busted one.
What an education! Thanks!!
When ordering my 929 strut part, I noticed that you can also buy the spring/strut assemblies in bags of 6 !! Thats got to tell you something. Also, they sell the strut with a "metal" end, vice the nylon. Naturally I have both on the way to compare. I wish I had your tip on the other flat spring/hand when I placed that order.... mine will probably break the first trip to the range! It sure is nice to know that parts are still available.
 

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I think they are excellent for what they were designed for and that is to carry often and shoot when needed.
They are not in my opinion designed for long-term constant shooting. They will last probably forever if you only shoot a cpl of boxes a year thru them.
Treat it like a kit gun and it should serve you well.

On the down side, a major repair will probably cost more in gunsmith services than the value of the gun.
 

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I purchased an H&R Model 903 revolver roughly 22 years ago and have fired several thousand rounds through it. Due to misfires caused primarily by light firing pin strikes, I had a local gunsmith bevel the pin and shim the hammer spring. Problem solved.

My Model 903 is still accurate and reliable.
 
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