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I have a Ruger Bisley 45 Colt. I mounted a Bausch & Lomb Elite 3000 2x pistol scope on it to aid in load development because I am fairly new to shooting open sighted handguns and wanted to first get an accurate load worked up before trying to figure out how to use open sights. Anyway I have a couple questions about this scope. First of all it sure does not seem to offer any magnification to speak of. Do any of you know what the actual magnification is? I was assuming that it would be 2x. Second question has to do with parallax. Being a long eye relief scope I find it is more difficult to ensure that the reticle is centered in the field of view. I do not know at what range this scope is supposed to be parallax free and wonder how much it would affect accuracy if the reticle is not centered in the field of view at the various ranges other than the parallax free range. I shoot at 100 yards occasionally but mostly at 25-30 yards. Also, unrelated to the scope but another question I have, is what is the best method of sandbag use or rest for accuracy testing from the bench with a revolver? Should I rest the barrel on the front sandbag or try to just rest the front of the frame/trigger guard area? Should I rest the butt of the gun on a rear bag or just my forearm? Thanks for the help, Brian.
 

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Hi Brian,
I hope I can help a little.  I have spent some time with scopes on 2 Ruger 44mag handguns.

1.  I have shot a Bushnell Trophy 2X scope for the last year.  I think it's actual magnification 1.6 or so.  Your owners manual or a sales brochure will probably tell you what yours is.  I have always read that a 1.5X scope will appear like it has no magnafication.  That is probably over generalized but the idea is right.

2.  For parrallax, I would again suggest you refer to your owners manual.  It is probably 100 yards but that is only a guess.  I found it very important (at any range) to always try to get exactly behind the center of the scope or accuracy suffered.  While that is pretty automatic with a well fitting rifle, I found it to be a very concious decision with a scoped handgun.

3.  I always sandbagged to the frame leaving the barrel untouched.  I never tried it the other way but have heard it's not a good idea.  

Have lots of fun.  You can really give rifle shooters a run for their money when you get all settled in.  

God bless..................  Bill M
 

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I'm going to jump in here since my cousin just went through this....Don't confuse parallax with the difficulty of seeing through a long relief scope. If the scope is parallax free the crosshairs will not move on the aiming point, even if the eye is not centered! The only way to check for parallax is to have the scope ( or pistol with scope) firmly bagged down with the cross hair on an aiming point. Without touching the scope or pistol, move your eye around. If the crosshair moves off the aiming point...you have parallax. Target scopes have an adjustment on the front of the tube to dial it out at various ranges. Most hunting scope are set.Sometimes, if you wear progressive lens glasses, like I do, it can be a real bear.
Best Regards from the Hammock....James
 
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