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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Is a Phosphor Bronze brush to be pushed completely thru before reversing or is it okay to reverse before while in the bore?
 

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New, or clean smooth bores should be pushed all the way through. Some nasty, pitted bores benefit by being scrubbed.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Is a Phosphor Bronze brush to be pushed completely thru before reversing or is it okay to reverse before while in the bore?
I was thinking about my 22 Revolver, Guess that I need a shorter brush then.
Existing brush would be to long for clearing the chamber.
 

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Do yourself a great favor and buy a short Bore Snake. It solves the problem quick and easy.
 

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The Troll Whisperer (Moderator)
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Don't push a bronze brush down the bore from the muzzle end. Muzzle wear means inaccuracy. Shooting lead bullets in a 22LR does not require a bronze brush anyway. That just results in excess bore wear. Try a nylon brush if you must.
 

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Not sure why we think that a softer metal like bronze will hurt a harder metal like steel. All you’re doing is wearing down the bronze bristles prematurely.
 

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"Laps" are made of soft metals that embed abrasive and cuts the harder metal.
 

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The Shadow (Moderator)
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Not sure why we think that a softer metal like bronze will hurt a harder metal like steel. All you’re doing is wearing down the bronze bristles prematurely.
Not sure what you think "steel" is a singular hard thing, it isn't.
22LR barrels in particular are "soft", when compared to center-fire animals. There simply is no need to spend the extra dough to make them tough enough to withstand what they'll never experience. Thusly if a ham handed gentleman comes along and thinks he's needs to stick a bronze brush in the bore and start sawing back and forth.....
This is so common, Brownells even talks about it in an episode of their "Smith Busters".

Cheers
 
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Smyth Busters: Will Cleaning Will Wear Out a Barrel?
"Cleaning a barrel will shorten its life." That's the "fact-or-myth" scenario a viewer submitted to our Smyth Busters, Brownells Gun Techs™ Caleb and Steve. Is it true? The barrels of .22 rimfire guns are made of softer steel, and careless cleaning with a screw-together, sectioned steel rod without a bore guide CAN lead to permanent damage to the rifling. Ammonia-based solvent, commonly used to remove copper fouling, can pit the bore if it is not thoroughly flushed from the barrel. Copper fouling on .22s isn't difficult to remove with regular bore solvent, so there's usually no need for an aggressive ammonia-based solvent. Long-range precision rifle shooters clean their barrels a LOT, and their barrels do tend to wear out - because of the high number of rounds fired, not due to the cleaning. Cleaning a barrel regularly with a good polymer-coated cleaning rod will in no way shorten its life, especially if it's a chrome-lined or Nitrided barrel. So the myth that cleaning wears out a barrel is BUSTED - as long as you're not a heavy-handed cleaner. Fouling degrades accuracy and reduces bore life, so go ahead and clean your barrel AS NEEDED.
 

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It's a myth that a softer metal can't effect change on the surface of a harder metal, if you've ever used brass or bronze brushes for metal work it's obvious. Pretty easy to round off corners or dig holes in steel with a brass brush. On a smaller scale those little brass brush wheels they make for dremel tools can damage unhardened steel as well.
I stopped using metal brushes in barrels a long time ago and they seem to shoot just as well and last longer.
 

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Cleaning is needed. Improper cleaning can be ruinous.
 
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The Hog Whisperer (Administrator)
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Nick has a post, or maybe several, detailing information from either The Accurate Rifle, or Precision Shooting (I think), detailing how reversing a bronze brush can in fact damage a steel barrel. Beyond remembering the existence of such, I'm not going to be much more help as far as details.

Anyway, with solvents that are on the market these days, I rarely use a brush at all. I let the solvent do the work. Saves a bunch of exercise for me, and uses fewer patches in the end. Takes a bit longer but generally I'm not in a hurry. Really stubborn fouling that seems to be taking forever to get out, gets an undersized brush wrapped with a patch, and some bore paste. But I don't reverse it in the barrel. Usually a few passes with that makes a lot of progress, in a hurry, and I rarely have to do it twice.

YMMV
 

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I quit using the bronze brushes when I started using the newer copper cleaners. I don't over clean barrels, but do it often enough that I don't (at least I think) get excessive buildup of crud and copper. Nylon has been working well.
 

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Damage from a reversed SS brush can be seen in a bore scope as 'stippling'. Different barrels need different treatment to keep in top notch condition. Bore Snakes do it for me quick and easy. They're no help when an extractor breaks, though. ;)
 

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Ok, maybe a dumb question (my personal area of expertise). Here goes ... if a soft metal like a lead lap or an aluminum cleaning rod can get imbedded with abrasive particals as advised everywhere, why can't nylon bristles or plastic coated rods? I mean, what is scotchbrite?

Just asking.
 

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If your obsessed with scrubbing barrels here's the brushes you need.

I just picked these up today, love that one on the left.
 

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Abrasive particles don't embed in most materials but any abrasive will act if caught between two moving objects. A hard lap, like brass, cuts very fast. Abrasives in a soft wool pad cuts slow. If the rod and patch tip don't touch the bore it's a moot point.
 

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Is a Phosphor Bronze brush to be pushed completely thru before reversing or is it okay to reverse before while in the bore?
In the case of a revolver, I would get a short brush. Overall, I'm not afraid of Phosphor bronze in any case. It has a
Rockwell hardness of about 80 on the B scale. An unhardened 4140 barrel has a Rockwell of about 93/99 B.

#17, I have read not to use aluminum cleaning rods due to the possibility of abrasive particles imbedding themselves into the rod. An old guy on y-tube. What makes him the know all/be all?? Nothing ! I ask myself if what he said made sense to me? Aluminum Rockwell 60B. It sounded reasonable to my ear.

"Laps" are made of soft metals that embed abrasive and cuts the harder metal. The laps are soft
so they can be charged with hard abrasive material.

I rarely change direction with the brush in the bore. When I know I'm going to have to I typically use Nylon.

I don't have one perfect way to clean. Some of my guns require that I go down past the crown. I simply protect it and
move on. I have measured the bronze bore brush and it's something like .010" over size or .230"

Given it's relative softness and the amount of time it actually spends wearing out the bore with the bronze, it's really not
worth my time to worry about. Be aware of... sure! If I clean my gun once a week and stroke it 50 time at each cleaning then that's a whooping 2500 strokes. Because I use bore guides and something to protect my crown , doing 50 strokes is easy.
But cleaning the bore once a month or less is much more realistic.
 
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