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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Here is a picture (finally) of my Clements .500 Redhawk. The barrel he made on a wire EDM machine (CNC) out of a 2" Pac-Nor barrel blank. It has a pin-in front site and the Bowen rear. Weight is 55 ounces, recoil is controllable and it is an absolute blast to shoot.:D
Mark
 

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Very nice. Congratulations. Now what did you say your address was? :p
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Anybody that wants to break in is free to try. They just have to keep in mind what they'll be dodging...:p
Mark
 

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On second thought, maybe I'll just admire that picture some more!! :p Looks like you've got a great sidearm. Ain't it great when a plan comes together?

By the way, I did correspond with Clements and I just may be shipping mine over to him, especially after seeing that picture of yours. The full lug looks really good.

Keep us updated on how it shoots and what it drops.
 

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"Bad Joke Friday" Dan (moderator emeritus)
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EDM????????????

Well, I waited as long as I could for someone else to ask what the significance of EDM machining is. Apparently I'm the only one that doesn't know? I looked on the web and found that a number of companies that advertise their Electical Discharge Machining capabilities, but quite frankly, knowing what EDM stands for only makes it more confusing.

Please let me in on it so I'm not the only one wandering around wondering what "electrical discharge" has to do with anything other than lighting.

Dan "always the last to know" K.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Okay, I'll try explain this. I'm not a professional machinist nor have I ever played one on TV, but EDM works like a wire welder (MIG) -- in reverse, taking away metal instead of adding it. The whole thing is computer controlled, so the operator just programs in the blueprint, sets up the material to be machined, and then the machine takes it from there while the operator is in bed asleep or wherever. The machines can hold some pretty tight tolerances and do a lot of things that would be difficult or impossible with conventional cutting tools. The process has even been used to rifle barrels, although that has fallen into some disfavor since the IPSC types discovered that they were just a hair less accurate than barrels made by older means.
The big advantage of these for a custom gunsmith is that it can make about anything you can draw up a blueprint for, without outrageous tooling costs attendant to one-off pieces, or expending days of labor at it. For example, there are several ways you can make a full-lug barrel. Smith & Wesson machines theirs from forgings. Works well on a production basis, but forget it for small quantities. Or you can do as Hamilton Bowen does, and set the barrel blank up between centers - twice - on a milling machine, spend about two days milling, and then hand finish from there. Takes several days of high-priced labor, which is why he only offers them as a 'best-grade' option, with a 'best-grade' pricetag to match. And it imparts a lot of stresses into the steel, which would affect accuracy, although perhaps not enough for a shooter like myself to notice. The ones that David made prior to getting the EDM machine he made by piecing together three seperate pieces of steel, a very painstaking and time-consuming process. Any further questions?:)
Mark
 

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"Bad Joke Friday" Dan (moderator emeritus)
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Hey, appreciate the information, easy to understand once you realize it's an subtractive process rather than an additive process that I "assumed" --- I had enlikened it to a welding type process. I can certainly appreciate the advantage on irregular (non-flat) surfaces.

Just to show my ignorance even further, I assumed that the large percentage of barrels for the custom "best grade" revolvers were Douglas, etc. and not fabricated by the gunsmith.

Final observation, was surprised by the weight of the revolver with 5.5" barrel, even with the full length lug. I'll bet it helps with the recoil.

Thanks again,

Dan
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Dan, no problem. What have you been up to this summer, anyway?
Yes, the weight seems to help quite a bit with the recoil, along with the porting. Slows it down, anyway.
On the barrel topic, Hamilton Bowen goes into great detail on that (and pretty much everything else) in his book. A lot of barrels, for single-actions in particular, are made from barrel-blank stock from one of several manufacturers. Others are made by reboring the factory barrel, a fairly ticklish process but about the only practical means for smiths (including Bowen) who don't have EDM machines.
Mark
 

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"Bad Joke Friday" Dan (moderator emeritus)
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I'm ashamed.........

Mark,

If you promise not to tell anyone, I'll admit to having sacrificed much of my shooting time this summer for the game (?) of golf. Darnest thing I ever tried. "Keep you day job" has new meaning to me.

I was watching the British Open and the announcer calmly announced that Els was 215 yards off the green and would take a "normal" five iron. I watched him swing about 1/4th as hard as I do and darned if the announcer wasn't correct. My drives don't go that far. It's a lot like comparing Jerry Miculek's double action performance to mine.

I'll get back to full time plinking this winter in Florida, a pistol range just 12 miles away, so shoot five days a week down there.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Dan,
I'll admit to having played golf exactly once in my life. Went on a date with a girl from Humeston, we went and played nine holes at the local course. I think I managed to score less that 100. Never went out with her or played golf since. You be careful about that golf addiction now. I know Limbaugh claims there's great golfing in FLA year-round. Pretty soon you'll be investing in titanium everything and have more money in your golf clubs than you do in your gun collection...;)
At the moment I'm waiting for the big lead pot to cool off; been making wheelweights into ingots again. Took a roadtrip to KC a month ago and invested in a 55-gallon drum full of them. 1532 lbs, including the drum. Should keep me in bullets for my big cannons for, oh, a year or two.:D
Mark
 

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"Bad Joke Friday" Dan (moderator emeritus)
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Well, good advice but a little late. Got Titanium everything except the putter. Irons were $1200 and woods were only $800, and that's still $1000 less than my best grade five shot .45LC!

We have a pretty good deal here in Cedar Rapids....senior season ticket for $440 for unlimited play on four good courses. At the rate I'm going, it will be less than $5 a trip ( I walk, no cart, that's for the younger players).

And yes, that amount of wheel weights should keep even the .500 up and running for quite a while. I assume you have moulds for the .500?

Dan
 
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