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Discussion Starter #1
I have a( new to me) 375 H&H Mag-Interarms Model X
stocked in a Bishop Stock.Glass bedded. I hear that 375 H&H
mags are known for splitting stocks. I have found Kits for Pillar bedding. Looks like you over bore the mounting screw holes, epoxy around the steel sleeve that surrounds the mounting screws.
Does anyone have experience in using these kits, are they necessary to protect the stock from splitting?
 

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Swifty,

Perhaps the biggest reason that the .375 H&H has the reputation for cracking stocks, is not so much the recoil of the gun, but LOOSE GUARD SCREWS! I've owned several .375 H&H's over the years, and many came through the gunshop when we owned it with cracked stocks as well. However, if you checked the guard screws on those guns, they were loose, in some cases very loose.

Many of these guns have beautiful pieces of fancy wood as stocks, but over time, the wood dries out to some degree, thus marginally shrinking, (as does any wood when moisture content decreases), and consequently the guard screws will become loose. Too, to compound things, when you tighten the screws on the gun while the wood is overly dried out, then subject the stock to a high humidity environment for a period of time the wood will once again swell to some degree, when this happens the screws don't give, and the action/trigger guard assemblies "crush into" the wood to some extint as it expands with the added moisture content. Then, when the wood once again dries out, the guard screws are loose, and the process begins all over again.

Keep the guard screws tight, checking them before a shooting or hunting session with your rifle, and I suspect that you'll never have a problem with a cracked stock, unless of course the gun has a fundamental bedding problem to begin with, however, most of these fine rifles are well bedded from the factory.

God Bless,

Marshall
 

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The Hog Whisperer (Administrator)
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It isn't just .375s that are at risk! I just got home from the range, had shot 9 or 10 rounds through the .338, and before I put it away, found that the front screw was completely loose.

Sort of explains the so-so groups I was getting ..... hope the stock isn't damaged. No cracks on the outside, I was going to glass bed it anyway, now it's a priority and will be done before taking it out again.

Haven't a clue how this happened, don't remember loosening it for any reason. When it goes back together, it will be with plenty of Loktite! Timely warning, Marshall.
 

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Mike,
The screws working loose are not unique to the heaiver calibers. I have "fixed" quite a few rifles with the same problem. Bedding and torqueing the screws should prevent it happening in the future. In wood or 'glass stocks without pillers, you should be careful making them too tight. If they have pillers, I go as much as 60 in/lbs , if not, never over 25 to prevent compressing the wood. In fact, depending on the denisity of the wood, it will compress anyway over time resulting in the screws becoming loose. Its hard to tighten the screws accuratly with a hand screwdriver. If you do decide to go the Loctite route, make sure you use the 242(blue) .
Hope some of this helps!
Bill
 

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Swifty- Screws kept tight as mentioned are important and pillar bedding would minimize the effects of wood expansion and contraction causing loosness. Pillars contribute little or nothing to actually making the stock stronger and preventing splits.

The Mark X is a Mauser 98 design and like all Mausers (IMHO)suffers from having a recoil lug that is too shallow and possibly placed too close to the magazine well. With a small surface behind the recoil lug a heavy recoiler or a rifle that is simply shot a lot eventually sets the wood back and metal starts to batter the stock in places where it won't support recoil. The rear tang area and the internal support in the stock between the trigger and the magazine are particularly prone to cracking. The wood behind the recoil lug can split or completely shear out.

Very good quality stock wood sets back less than soft wood. Most factory stocks do not have wood that qualifies as very good and some is just poor to marginal.

A good glass bedding job can add strength to the wood if done correctly and may be enough to prevent splitting. If you examine all the military 98's you will see that they have a steel cross bolt supporting the recoil lug. Properly fitted this provides optimum protection. Some rifles have a second cross bolt installed in the web behind the magazine well and that is further insurance.

Very heavy recoilers often get a second recoil lug placed on the barrel a couple or more inches in front of the receiver and there is usually another screw through the stock attaching the forend to this lug.

One critical factor that is commonly overlooked is not having the action screws relieved along their sides from the wood (the holes need to be a tiny bit oversized compared to the screws). A lot of Mauser stocks crack at the tang because of a little set back at the recoil lug and the rear screw is impacting the steel bushing that surrounds it (this is a mini-pillar intended to prevent the narrow footprints of the trigger guard and rear tang from compressing the wood under them.) This steel mini pillar is a necessity in a Mauser although there are other forms of pillars that would do the same thing.

If you don't have (or put in) the forward cross bolt and elect to see if the glass bedding will do the job follow the guys suggestions about maintaining screw tension and also check periodically for any indication that the rear screw is making hard contact on the bushing (can usually be seen as a shiny spot on the interior of the bushing and you can sometimes feel the screw dragging on the bushing when you are taking it out) .

The MarkX is considered to be a well made Mauser that can sometimes use a bit of polishing on internal surfaces to make it slick but nevertheless is good steel, properly treated.
The potential stock problems associated with all Mausers remains with the Mark X and a bit of vigilance can save some grief. best
 
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