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Discussion Starter · #1 ·



I am trying to figure out exactly what this gun is.


It has been in my family since the 1940's.


We where told it was a Charlieville but, it has the name De Culle marked on the lock. The gun is clearly patterned after the 1777 model Charlieville either Dragoon or Navy. I could only find 2 examples of a De Culle weapon on line. One was a Lock that was by it self and no info, the other was a converted 1822 pistol that had considerably more markings. The full name on those samples where Mre Rle De Culle where as this gun is Mre ump De Culle.


It is a .69 Cal. It was definitely a Flintlock when it was manufactured. it is close in size to the 1777 model. Barrel length 40.5" overall 55.5 barrel tip to top of butt plate. There is a cheek cut on the left side of the butt stock and there is the two finger grip ridges behind the trigger guard which where both constant with the 1777 Charlieville. Finally there is a casting mark on the inside of the front barrel band that appears to me to be 1790 or 1780 followed by 140, but it is quite eroded.


We where told it was converted to percussion by the confederacy for the civil war. This may be posable as there where a number if conversion armories especially in 1862. Further, there is a 62 stamped on the breach plug and bottom of the barrel. There is also what appears to be inspector stamps (IC) on the lock, outside of the trigger guard and the front barrel band. The hammer and hammer retaining screw are not original as they where not on the gun when we got it. In the 70's I adapted a Springfield type hammer to get it fire-able.


Some oddities:


1 the center barrel band seems in an incorrect position and I do not believe this would be the correct band for this gun as the stamped symbol is unlike any of the others on this gun.

2 The barrel is riffled and the original french make was a smooth bore. Rifling could have been broached in at the time of conversion especially as mini-balls replaced the round ball and patch ammo.


Any Help would be greatly appreciated. --ken


Some detail pics:




I do Have Hi rez Images if they would be of help email me [email protected]
 

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Can't help with the ID, but you mite want to contact the Museum of the Confederacy in Richmond VA, they have a large collection of period pieces and the gentlemen there have always been of great help in the past
 

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Maybe you could also take it in to one of PBS' Antique Roadshow sessions, within driving distance - the sessions are held all around the country - check for this year's tour schedule: On Tour | Antiques Roadshow | PBS

AR has at least two CSA experts on board.



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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thank you all for your responses. I will contact the museum of the confederacy to see if they have any suggestions. I like the antiques road show idea but I am in Chicago and they are having the event at McCormick place which might make it impossible to bring in the riffle, but I will see.
 

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Maybe you could also take it in to one of PBS' Antique Roadshow sessions, within driving distance - the sessions are held all around the country - check for this year's tour schedule: On Tour | Antiques Roadshow | PBS

AR has at least two CSA experts on board.



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If you try this route, be aware that tickets are distributed by lottery and it may be years before you get one, if ever. You can, however, send them a description and photos of an interesting item you have, and that can get you an invitation.
 
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