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What's your favorite powder measure? I load H110, Unique and 2400 in my .44 and H4831 and 4895 in my .338. Have always used scoops and/or a scale along with my old single stage press. Thinking I should probably invest in a powder measure. What would be a good accurate and reliable powder measure for these powders?
 

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Eric, I wish I could give you a definative answer as to which one is the best, but the truth is I cannot.  For the past 32 years I have been using the Lyman 55 powder measure with complete satisfaction with all powders.  Only when I started loading the .50 BMG did the small #55 present a problem due to it's reservoir capacity, so I bought the larger #55 BP which holds a full pound of powder.  However, I never try to throw the exact amount.  I throw the charge a few tenths light and trickle to exact weight.  While the #55 throws well over 120 grains of powder, for the .50 BMG I have to throw twice, then trickle to full amount.  If interested in throwing 240 grs. plus, the new Hornady is capable of that much powder per throw, but if you do not need that much capacity-which the .44 and .338 never will-then I would not hesitate to recommend the Lyman measure.  While I have been completely satisfied with the #55, truth of the matter is I have never tried any other measure, nor do I intend to.  The old #55 does everything I have ever asked it to do and that's good enough for me.
 

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Keep in mind, this is only my opinion! My favorite powder dispensor is the one that came with my dillon press. It is available separately. I have 3 different powder dispensors. The dillon, a Midway (which is a copy of a different dispensor of which I can't think of the name), and a &#3620 Lee. The reason I like the Dillon is that it never gives me problems. H110 is a fine powder. So fine that it locks up the cylinder of the Midway dipensor (some people have been nice enough to offer some advise on fixing the problem, but nothing seems to work) and passes right out the side of the rotating cylinder of the Lee. I had a similar problem of powder leakage with the Dillon, but they sent me a new unit and the problem is fixed. When I use my single stage press, the Dillon dispensor mounts right on the Midway powder stand.
  Bottom line: Are you ever going to buy a progressive loader soon? Buy a Dillon 550b and enjoy. For &#3620, the Lee works just fine for flake type powders. For &#36100 the Midway cuts long cylindrical type powders (rifle powders)better than the Lee and Dillon.
Hope this helps, Mark.
 

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Eric,

I spent nearly 10 years loading just like you are. I held off on the powder measure because of all the reports i got from guys that were never happy with their measures. When I load I want the best ammo I can make, no matter what kind of shooting I'm doing. I load 45 ACP on a Dillon Square Deal and that measure works just fine for the powders I use for the cartridge. A few months back I broke down and bought the Redding #3br measure.

This is the top of anybodys line in measures. It comes with two different powder chambers, one for pistol and one for rifle. It works incredibly smooth and delivers perfect charges every time. Check out wholesalehunter.com for the best price I found on the net.
 

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i have tried different powder measure's for H110 powder and found the RCBS uniflow powder measure works the best.  I tried a Lee powder measure, I was not impressed with it.
 

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Eric,

I use a Dillon 550B and love it.  Two things which seem to affect accuracy in the powder measure are 1) increased volumes  and 2) longer tubular powders.  These two seem to cause more variation.  I'm not talking catastrophic variation here just slightly more.  At least three powder bars are available.  Using a larger one seems to help, since it is not close to its capacity.

I'm told that some measures like a "follower" which amounts to a small flat weight resting on the powder to keep consistent pressure at all times.  In the Dillon, there is one available that also has a low powder sensor.    Sooner or later I will buy this device or make one of my own.  

I have had no trouble with the Dillon measure except when I started loading for my .300 Win Mag, using RL25.  I have no been getting consistent enough loads for my likeing, so I measure each one in the scale.  But that's what I like about the 550B.  Though a progressive, it can be used to load single cartridges at a time.  One can take them out, inspect, repowder, do whatever, fuss around for a long time just on one cartridge all to your hearts desire.  Or if needed, you can crank out dozens of good quality rounds in a few minutes.  I tend to do that with pistol rounds that I use for recreational shooting of swinging steel targets and the like.  With my hunting rounds, I tend to weigh more often, and lately every round.  

Straight wall cases tend to fill with less variation I think, though I've never ran tests to really varify that.  

Though I've never used any of the powders you mentioned I'm very satisfied with the Dillon.  I use Red Dot, Green Dot, Blue Dot, RL7, RL15, RL19, RL25.
 

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Eric,

I have the RCBS Uniflow which works quite well. Thinking of upgrading it someday with the micrometer stem. I've also used a Redding Measure borrowed from a friend at one time. Now that's a Cadillac.

I also have a Lyman Accumeasure that has a set of fixed rotors, got them in a whole set for a good price.

Having stated all that, I have gone back to Lee scoops and a scale because I'm doing a lot of what MT refers to as "advanced load development". I simply pick a scoop that throws a light charge and trickle up. Easiest deal right now with minimal setup time.

I've also gone back to a balance beam scale over an electronic but, that's another story. :biggrin:


FWIW,

:cool:
 

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Eric,

By far the best measure I have ever used is the Lee Perfect Powder Measure. Prior to getting one I had owned and used measures from RCBS and Hornady.
Both bridged very badly with extruded powders. The Lee does not at all.

My best friend finally learned to listen to me regarding this measures as well. His Dillon acts much the same as my RCBS and Hornady. Extruded just would not drop with any consistency. It was so bad, he gave up on using several different extrudeds in his .223 service rifle loads. (HeHeHe... guess who benefitted from free gunpowder?:wink:)

Then he stopped by one day when I was working with IMR 4064. Duly impressed, he now uses a Lee Perfect for his match loads.
 

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I agree, the Lee perfect is a great measure. I have not seen anything on this forum about the Lee Auto Disk measures. With this measure and a set of Lee dies with the powder through expander die I have loaded some of the most accurate pistol ammo in my 18 year career as a handloader. It is a lot quicker to use than some other products too.
 

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MSG K: Welcome to the board!

I would certainly agree with your assessment of the Auto Disk. It is simple and safe to use. A great measure for someone who uses a limited number of rounds and/or experimental loads. My brothers and I have used one for a very long time, upwards of 12 years. But for myself, I do perfect the greater flexibility of the Perfect.

(Edited by Bill Lester at 8:41 am on May 1, 2001)
 

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I've used a number of different powder measures over the years... currently own a passle of them.

RCBS Uniflow
Herters Micrometer Stem Measure
Redding BR3
Dillon
RCBS Little Dandy
Lee Perfect Powder Measure
Lee Auto-Disk
Lyman 55

While they all work well for the purposes intended, if I were to single out only one of these measures, it would have to be the Redding BR3.   It is by far the very best measure I've ever used, with fine ball powders or with the large grain extruded types, it functions flawlessly, and to great accuracy, due in part to the powder baffle.

While on the subject of the powder baffle, it takes little imagination to fashion one of these from the top of a vegetable can using a pair of tin-snips!   Greatly enhances the charge to charge consistency of the Uniflow, Lyman 55 and that new Midway powder measure.   Well worth the ten minute investment to fashion one of these little jewels.

Bottom line on measures, since you're going to trickle in the last few grains of powder on precision loads anyhow, whatever fits your budget.   For single stage use, I would suggest staying with a rotary type measure, and not the Dillon or Auto-Disk configurations.

Let us know what you decide!

God Bless,

Marshall
 

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Hi Marshall -

Do you load everything (pistol and rifle ammo) on a single stage press?  If you use a turret or progressive for pistol rounds, what measurer do you use?
 

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Alan,

I have a Dillon that I use (actually my daughter 12 yrs. old uses it more than me) for volume work, and the standard Dillon measure stays with that unit for handgun stuff.   It does a great job, especially with the finer ball powders.

I also have one of the Lee Load Masters (what a mistake.... anyone want it CHEAP!!!!!) the Auto-Disk powder measure does a surprisingly good job on it... although I avoid this press like the plague these days.... I have better things to do than tinker constantly with a cantankerous progressive press... the only thing progressive about it is the progression of frustration levels.

All else goes single stage, and if using a measure, one of the rotary types I listed earlier.   I usually keep one set up for favorite loads and leave it that way... saves me time.

They all have their place.

God Bless,

Marshall
 

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My favorite powder measure is the Belding and Mull,which I bought  around 1950. I replaced the guts about 18 or 20 years ago,and it still will give more consistenty accurate loads,with "stick"powder then either of my 2 RCBS measures. With anythiing smaller then IMR 3031,The drum type are just as good,and faster to use. I recommend the micrometer adjustment  for the  RCBS. I used to waste enough time,adjusting it, that  I would  use  the B&M because it had a recorded adjustment  that could be repeated very quickly.
New B&M measures are,I think,no longer available,but  used ones are worth considering,and maybe parts are still available from PA.
I'll be keeping my eyes open for more comments about the Lee;It may be the way to go,ffor long powders.
 
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