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Hi guys there is anyone tell me remington what type of powder they use for handguns like the umc bullets ? I have some boxes of umc's 9mm 115 gr fmj and i open some bullets. The powder is black and the charge is 3.9 and some 4.0 gr. Thank's agian .
 

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I don't know what powder Remington uses in those loads, and it is possible that no one does. Large companies often do not use what are called "cannister" powders, which are those typically available for people who handload; rather, they purchase bulk powders blended by powder makers specifically tailored to the performance specifications of the manufacturer. The exact powder they use this year may not be the same as the powder they use next year, although it will provide the same performance.
 

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Actually it is the canister powders that are blended with held back lots to adjust them to a fairly consistent burn rate. That is necessary for the load data in databooks to remain reasonably correct from one lot to the next. The bulk powders used by manufacturers are the non-blended ones. The factory has pressure test equipment and they can adjust the charge to match the pressure they want, regardless of what burn rate the bulk lot has. Sometime these powders are the same ones that have canister versions for handloaders and sometimes they are powders not available to hand loaders at all. It's the same situation with military powders.

The low charge weights you give suggest the powder is pretty quick and energetic. If the loads produced modest velocities then it is likely not dissimilar to Winchester 231 (same thing as Hodgdon HP38) according to old Winchester load data. More recent data requires a bit more of it. Nonetheless, that is what I would start with, as you can always increase the charge a little if it isn't satisfactory.

QuickLOAD thinks Accurate Nitro 100 could be even closer, but I can't find any published load data for it in 9 mm to confirm that. It's meant to be a shotgun powder, but lots of shotgun powders end up serving in pistol loads, so that's not a stopping point, but you would be on your own to experiment. I would start with about 3.5 grains and work up in .2 grain increments if you go this Nitro 100 route.

I think the 231 route is safer because of the amount of data available, but the computer models think either can be made to work. The UMC loads are under 350 ft-lbs from a 4" tube, so this is not hard to do with fast powder without exceeding pressure limits. If you were trying to get to military 400 ft-lb energy levels, then these powders would both be too fast and would exceed normal pressure limits before you got the velocity up there. It takes something slower, like Power Pistol to get to that load level safely.
 

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Nick, I have heard that Accurate Nitro 100 has apparently changed and that they no longer recommend it for any handgun use whatsoever. That seems odd to me, but it seems to be true. Their current load data (Version 3.3) shows no handgun loads whatever using N100 - which used to be shown in many if not most handgun cartridges. It used to be highly recommended for the 45 Colt, for example; now, no mention at all.

If you have a supply of the old Nitro 100, use old data for it. I do, and I really like the stuff. But I wouldn't buy any of the new stuff for handgun use.
 

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I forgot to add: the new cans apparently have a note on the label that says "For Shotgun Reloading Only" or some such. So at least you can tell them from a can of the older stuff if you see some on a store shelf. But that's the ONLY notice of the change I can find anywhere, unless I missed it on their website.
 

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Interesting. I wonder if they saw new mystery "spikes" like Alliant did with Blue Dot in some loads, or if it's an actual change? I gather Accurate changes suppliers from time to time. In their shoes, I would change the powder name if I knew I had a significantly different product. That would be to avoid potential liability issues stemming from old data. Curious. Thanks for the heads-up.
 

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Those were exactly my thoughts, Nick. On another website, a poster bought a jug of Nitro 100 based on recommendations on that board (including mine). Sadly, he didn't read the label until he got it home, and by law, powder cannot be returned due to tampering concerns. His reaction was an angry WIH? and I cannot but agree with him.

That was how I learned of the switch or whatever happened.
 
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