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Is it a good idea to shoot a round through a newely cleaned barrell before trying to shoot a group, and do most guys run a dry patch or wet through on the final one? Thank you

Dan
 

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I run a dry patch through after cleaning, and shoot from a clean bore.

Others will swear that fouling shots are a must, and still others will claim that cleaning a gun at all will ruin accuracy. - I have never found this to be true.
 

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Shooting a range of barrels from 17 Rem through to 375JDJ I have found that in the main over cleaning isn't really necessary unless I am out in some wet or even damp weather or come into a warm house from cold outside when condensation can settle on cold metal. I give my barrels a serious clean about once a year unless one of them starts to spread a group. Even the 17 Rem doesn't get scrubbed out that often BUT I don't shoot lots and lots of rounds, just a few dozen if that to check zero for each calibre before going out and maybe firing a couple of business shots.
My work rifle back in the 70s was always left with a fouled barrel because it always threw a round first and sometimes second on a clean barrel before settling back on zero. Of course never fire a round through a wet barrel and that is where a bore snake comes in handy, a quick pull through before venturing out ensures the barrel is dry.
I think you find a couple of hundred differing views on this subject.
 

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My work rifle back in the 70s was always left with a fouled barrel because it always threw a round first and sometimes second on a clean barrel before settling back on zero.

I think you find a couple of hundred differing views on this subject.
That's my view. I clean with Ed's Red and then dry patch. At the range, if it throws the first shot (or couple shots) it gets fouled before hunting or shooting for score.

Listen to YOUR rifle. It will tell you how it wants to be treated.
 

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The Shadow (Super Mod)
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Is it a good idea to shoot a round through a newely cleaned barrell before trying to shoot a group,
I can only tell you what I do.

I don't clean for the sake of cleaning once I have shot a rifle, I also don't live in a humid environment most of the time.
I typically run around 30-35% humidity(not counting hunting in the rain). I clean when groups begin to drop, but not until. That may or may not cause "pre-mature" barrel life fall short, but my current high-round rifle is my 308. That rifle still holds MOA at 1K, and is sitting over 4,000 rounds. So in my situation, it doesn't cause enough extra wear that causes me any concern.
 

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I think dollar bill nailed it. Listen to your rifle if you take some time your rifle will clearly show you. Some of mine like a dirty barrel some like a pristine one one of those things one has to play with.
 

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On a sub category should we break in a new rifle? I know opinions are all over the place but is there any science on barrel break in? Do any manufactures recommend or advise it.
 

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If.the barrel is clean, really really clean, then you may need to shoot 4-6 rounds before the bore becomes consistent enough to shoot groups. Experiment and record the data for reference.
 

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I'm sort of anal about bore cleaning.
I clean the bore after every use, but always fire a round before serious range work and before hunting.
Jim
 

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Another vote for letting the rifle show you what it likes. I clean my rifles after each use but fire a few rounds checking zero before a hunt. In that case they don't get cleaned until after the season. Its the first pill out of the tube that's the most important, you need to know where it will go.
 

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The Shadow (Super Mod)
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On a sub category should we break in a new rifle? I know opinions are all over the place but is there any science on barrel break in? Do any manufactures recommend or advise it.
McMillan was very vocal about it being a ploy to sell barrels. That write-up can be found various places online. I have and haven't, never noticed a difference. All comes down to what lets you sleep at night.
 
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If.the barrel is clean, really really clean, then you may need to shoot 4-6 rounds before the bore becomes consistent enough to shoot groups. Experiment and record the data for reference.
Yep, I agree. Usually 4-6 shots does it in my Marlin centerfires. My 39A takes about 20 shots before it starts to behave :D.

Dan
 

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as always, thank guys! figured i would ask after spending part of the weekend cleaning and bore pasting a few of my rifles. Same loads i worked up a month ago, and after cleaning they all went to he!!. I was expecting great things and was very disapointed but only shot 3-6 shots from each gun. Was so frustrated i quit.

Dan
 

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Whenever I buy a new rifle I usually give it a regular lube on all the moving parts and wipe off any excess.

As far as the barrels are concerned, I use JB Paste and give each new barrel around 100 full strokes with the paste and then I clean all of that up. In my experience, after that workout the barrel is broken in and you can start to shoot for groups.

Although I did shoot and clean in the early years I learned that it's not necessary to go through some kind of shoot and clean, shoot and clean procedure and I figure it to be a waste of time and ammunition to spend a day at the range on a project like that.

I always take a look at m barrels and if one is dirty I might run a patch through it but on the whole I seldom clean. I've been shooting for years and typically my rifles only require a check to see if an adjustment to my scopes are required before hunting season.
 

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have ya ever wondered why, after putting away a perfectly sighted rifle after hunting season, when you check it for "zero" it's off ? Sometimes it's an inch and sometimes more How does that happen while the rifle has sat "unmolested" in the safe or rack ? "IF" it is demons when did they do their dirty work, right after or just before ?
 

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When I am done shooting a particular firearm for any length of time (several months) I use a bore snake only in the barrel, strip them down and clean the action. Others that I shoot regularly I clean residue from the bolt face and action but that is about it. If a semi auto use a little grease on the rails. Most of mine do shoot a different point of impact when they are clean. When checking a hunting rifle for zero prior to season I leave it uncleaned afterwards. However most of my barrels are Stainless Steel.
Check out MGM's site, they tell you what they recommend for breaking in new barrels.
 

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The Hog Whisperer (Administrator)
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have ya ever wondered why, after putting away a perfectly sighted rifle after hunting season, when you check it for "zero" it's off ? Sometimes it's an inch and sometimes more How does that happen while the rifle has sat "unmolested" in the safe or rack ? "IF" it is demons when did they do their dirty work, right after or just before ?
That's exactly why I free-float the barrels on my hunting guns, and glass-bed the actions. Same zero, year after boring year :D

I know rifles will often shoot better groups with forend pressure on the barrel, but when they are free-floated they shoot to the same spot every year.

I have rifles that have not had the scopes adjusted on them in years. Literally.
 

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Always shoot a 5 shot group just prior to the hunt to assure zero, then don't clean the bore until after the hunt.

In between target sessions during the year, will scrub the bores bright clean with no trace of carbon/copper fouling left. Very lightly oil the bore and wipe the outside down with silicone cloth. Prior to range time, will run a dry patch and then shoot to see where first shot lands. Usually, right in the middle of the remaining 4 shots for that group.
 
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I have used a Steyr Model M Professional ever since I can remember. I believe I was around 10 years old when I inherited the rifle. It has a free float barrel and has never changed POI in all the years I have used it; from '84 to last weekend. When I was a kid and before the Internet cleaning the bore was an unknown procedure. I believe it received it's first bore cleaning about 10 years ago using a rod down the muzzle. Fortunately I did not hurt the crown and it is still a tack driver. I started using bore guides and solid rods along with Otis kits but primarily on range guns. In all those years the Steyr's hammer forged barrel did not suffer accuracy from not being cleaned. Something of a mystery with today's cleaning guidelines. Having stayed with Federal Premium Sierra Gameking SP loads all these years even the 30 year gap in load batches still shoot the same.

I have found myself these days thinking about a fouling shot at the start of hunting season yet never do it and have yet to regret it. I suppose if I had to guess I would attribute the long term accuracy to the free float barrel. My dad always stressed shooting our rifles before the season but that changed over time. I attribute that to the polymer stocks that were being used. He said that the traditional wooden stocks wood place pressure on the barrel in a different way every year which could be attributed to humidity changes during storage; the change in humidity during storage shifted the grain of the wood and both bedding and a non float barrel would change just enough to require checking POI each season.

I still check other rifles I hunt with as they have not had long term proof. They are synthetic free float rifles but are using newly designed QD scope mounting designs and newer optics which have to be proven with time. The fouling shot has not been necessary but these are also hammer forged free float barrels. One is using Federal Premium and the other I am trying to establish good results with Remington CoreLokt to have a more economical load to shoot outside of hunting environments.

I always figured a cold 20 degree barrel is going to shoot different than a pre season 5 shot group at 85 degrees and climbing when firing a test string at the range. I will now run a bore snake if I hunt in the rain.
 

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have ya ever wondered why, after putting away a perfectly sighted rifle after hunting season, when you check it for "zero" it's off ? Sometimes it's an inch and sometimes more How does that happen while the rifle has sat "unmolested" in the safe or rack ? "IF" it is demons when did they do their dirty work, right after or just before ?
@ Back Country; My first bolt rifle- a Ruger 77 in 7 Rem. Mag. did the same thing(new in '76) for the 1st two yrs. I couldn't figure it out for the life of me until I thought it MIGHT be the humidity affecting the stock and bedding. [Zero-in=perfect pre-season sub MOA; Put it [email protected] end of season w/perfect zero and summer check=7''low/5"left]; So I re-zero, do a little Ma Bell communicating with some of our feral fidos and put it up again 'til hunting season in Nov. Back to 6''H/ 4"R. So I start to remove the action and it was tight and squeaky.
Backyard carpenter that I was, if a little was good,, Then more was Gooder. So after an 3/16" channel all around the barrel, and 4 coats of sealer, I re-assembled the rifle, re-zeroed; Still had Under MOA grouping and haven't had a problem with POI shift since '78. The sight-in load was then and still is [140 gr. Sierra FB Spitzer, 66.4 gr. IMR 4831, Rem brass 91/2 M primers @ 3.265"OAL. It still wears the original 'cheap' Bushnell Banner w/ BDC "C" drum,($39.95) and will still literally 'bust a thumbtack' @ 100yds as it first did in '76. It repeatedly shot into the bottom of a soda can at a measured 440 yds. provided you waited a couple minutes between shots (this one has the pencil-thin barrel) and I must admit it was by a better shot than I am. BUT, the point is that you may want to check your bedding and possibly float the barrel. [ although perhaps not so wide a gap] Admittedly, not a pretty sight but it hasn't changed POI a bit in 36yrs. And even with my aging eyes, will land 5 rds. into (fully covered by) a nickel @ 100 yds. It, and my 336-.30-30 are my first go-to rigs come Bambi Callin' time.
Good luck and Good Huntin' . WILL.
 
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