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I want some feedback from reloaders who use sealer for their primer pocket. The last time I looked at factory ammo for 308, 30-06,they use it. Shelf life is longer? My brass is once fired,pockets cleaned with LEE pocket pr. reamer. Just seems like it is a good idea since lightly reaming the pocket changed the press fit slightly.What says experience?
 

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Many reports of unsealed ammunition getting wet, submerged under water etc. and no problems. For me, it makes sense to use dedicated sealer or nail polish for critical ammunition (self-defense or hunting) or for long term storage TEOTWAWKI ammunition.
 
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Thank you for your opinion. Would you use nail polish? does it cause any problems for reloads,easy to clen out after it was in place etc.?
 

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Remember what you put on you have to remove next time you reload. Unless you plan on going to war in a jungle I don't see any need for it. Non of your factory hunting ammo is sealed-I have never had a problem with moisture due to ammo getting wet.
 

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If you feel you need to seal them, get you some green loctite #290. It is a litte expensive but it's extremely thin and will get down into the seam very well. One little drop, let it work around and wipe the excess off. Do not get the idea of trying it on the bullet also. This stuff is and extremely strong adhesive when it cures, and it's designed to penetrate. Not too sure what it would do to chamber pressures trying to push the bullet out after that stuff got hold to it.

A drop of a thin Cynoacrylate (Super Glue) will do it also but the stuff is a royal pain to work with. Even if you drop and wipe fast, it still wants to stick to everything it and you touch. You can get in the model paints and glues at Hobby Lobby.
 

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When I was in college, I ran 4 or 5 rounds of .30-06 handloads in new brass through the washing machine. RP brass, WLR primers, and 180gr. Ballistic Tips. Powder was IMR-4350, for what that's worth.

Fortunately, found them before the laundry went into the dryer. They all went 'bang' next trip to the range.

I've never even given a second thought to primer sealants since that.
 

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There is a commercial primer seal made- I've seen it in catalogs but never used it. Personally, I've never felt the need for primer sealing.
 

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It might be important for a Navy SEAL - or a cop who "cleans" his gun with a long spray of penetrating oil every night. Us? Nah.
 

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I use the stuff but to the top of .45acp rat shot shells. The plug that's used in them is worthless. I've never used the stuff for it's intend use as primer seal. Works good to seal rat shot though.
 

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Board member Humpy reported some rounds going bad after sitting nose-down in an open box on a bench at a covered range with a leaky roof that was dripping rain on the case heads. I'm sure this happening depends how good the lacquer coating on the primer mix over the anvil is (cracked by seating or not), and on the condition of the primer pocket. Even a short drop would add considerable inertia to the water to help drive it in if any path is available.

I've never had a round killed by moisture, but due to scratches creating capillary-like channels, I would expect it more likely to be a problem for brass reloaded several times than for new brass. If the pockets had dirt and, obviously, if they are so loose you really shouldn't be reloading them anyway, those factors can contribute to making paths for capillary action.

As Rocky suggested, the military seals ammo so it can survive being submerged to water pressures higher than you'll get near the surface. If I were building ammo for very long term storage or for likely exposure to solvents, I think I would seal both primer and bullet, though the greater penetration path length around the bullet makes it less vulnerable. But, in for a penny, in for a pound.

In the meantime, I can't be bothered.
 
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I've used nail polish...

I've used nail polish to seal mine when I had to resize 5,000 loaded rounds. I dumped the powder, painted the bottoms, let it dry a good 30 minutes, then sprayed the cases with cooking spray and resized 'em. No problems. I wondered if several coats would make primer ignition difficult, so I painted one three times. Again, no problems. If you do use nail polish, use white. It is much easier to see than clear.
 

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I have used nail polish to color code for different loads but not for waterproofing. No need as I have stored ammo in ammo cans for up to 20 years with no moisture problems.
 

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I just loaded some rounds with components that were stored for a good 20 years and they were not stored in water proof containers. No problems with shooting them a couple days ago.
 

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Presumably, being tighter and longer, the space between the bullet and case are harder to penetrate. But to my fellow SCUBA divers, I would say you have a point.
 

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I inadvertantly ran a 44 mag. handload through the washing machine some years ago with no perceived ill effects. As long as each component fits "tightly" together, the cartridge should last in any concievable environment longer than any of US ever will.
 

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Except the conceivable one I mentioned: deep underwater. The SEALs need their guns to work when they come up from several atmospheres of water pressure, and I expect that's one reason the military likes sealed bullets. It's not something the average hunter needs to worry about.
 

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Why seal the primer and or neck of the case? No reason unless one or the other or both leak. For long term storage of loaded ammo the need for a good seal is against atmospheric changes. Before I seal the primer and or neck of the case I will load the ammo, heat up a 30 cal. 20mm ammo can then load the ammo (neatly) in the can then shut the lid with the cam over latch, label it and then wait for the atmosphere in side the can to cool, then forget the effect time takes on on everything inside the can. Same for pistols, lube, wrap, heat the can, load the can, close the lid and it is done.

Testing ammo for leaks: I have no shortage of vacuum pumps or wide mouth gallon jars, just modify the lid, fill with loaded ammo (test group), finish filling with water, place vacuum on jar then watch for bubbles, if you are busy and do not have time to watch, load ammo without powder, place a vacuum on the jar, then later pull the bullets and check for water.
It is not likely the reloader knows the total weight of the components in each round loaded, but on the outside chance the weight is known the reloader could, after removing from the vacuum test jar, weigh the ammo again to determine if the case took on any water.


It beats talking about something that may never happen, Electrolysis is the bigger problem of the two with the different metals used in ammo, still reducing the moisture in the atmosphere reduces electrolyses.

Or load the can only on dry days.

F. Guffey
 

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Have been reloading ammunition since 1963 and have yet to seal a primer in the thousands of reloads that I've turned out.

Not saying there aren't conditions under which primers should be sealed but I'm not a Navy Seal nor do I leave exposed ammunition under a leaky roof in the rain.

IME, for most of us, it's unnecessary to seal primers.
 
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