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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Ive taken my beretta to the range a few times and can never seem to get a good grouping
Im not an expert marksmen but i could always get a noticeably better grouping with the glock 20 and remington 1911 i shot there
ive been searching over the internet for similar issues and i also inspected the gun and noticed the barrel seems to have a slight downwards angle, im not really a firearms expert and i was wondering if this is normal or if this could be the source of the problem as me and my brother both noticed it seemed to shoot low
a way to fix this would also be helpful
 

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- How low is low, and at what distance?
- What size groups are you getting, and at what distance?
- What kind of ammo?
- You mentioned getting "good groupings". What is a "good group"? (I'm just trying to get a reference.)

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The "S" is an older model by quite a few years. I would do a thorough clean on the barrel assembly, inside and out including the locking block. I would also add a new recoil spring, lockup might be a little wimpy and inconsistent. The 92 series is designed as a combat firearm for military use. As such the notch in the rear sight is wide, really wide, when compared to non-military handguns. The wide notch allows the front sight to be seen easier in low light conditions, unfortunately this makes it harder to shoot nice tight groups. A new commercial rear sight might solve some of the issues.

Because the 92 is capable of double action, the trigger has room to move a longer distance after the sear is moved and the hammer is falling. Depending on how easy or how hard the hammer releases affects the overtravel of the trigger pull. Try to pay a lot of attention in keeping the trigger finger moving smoothly and not getting a tiny jerk after the hammer is released.

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I always suspect shooter error when there are accuracy problems, especially when shooting a quality gun with quality ammo. No ill will is meant, I've just spent a lot of time on the range testing guns and teaching shooters.

- Pay a lot of attention to the sight alignment when pulling the trigger.
- Have someone watch the gun while you dry fire, looking for movement of the gun and the direction of movement.
- Use smaller targets or a smaller aiming point.
- Keep the trigger held to the rear until recoil subsides.
- Do not look to see where the bullet strikes until recoil subsides.

You and your brother spend some time watching the gun operate, it is easier than it sounds but does take a little practice to see all that is happening. First with dry fire then with live ammo.

Don't worry about the barrel pointing downwards.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I guess i will keep trying to improve my technique which i would have just assumed was the cause had i not shot the other 2 handguns
i cant really recall specific detail of the difference in groupings since the last time i went shooting was several weeks ago but the berretta was shooting mostly down and to the right from where i was aiming with a spread noticeably larger than the 10mm and the .45 i rented at the range
 
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