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The Folks at NEI and others say the proper way to slug a revolver is to pass the slug through the cylinder rather than the barrel. I slugged my Ruger Red Hawk 44 magnum with a 7 1/2" barrel. The Cylinder was .432 the end of barrel next to the cylinder .432 and the muzzel end of barrel is .430.
I have an RCBS Keith style mould that cast as is .430.
Its seems I am getting a lot of stiff gray patches when I clean the gun.
Is this residue the leading that I hear about in cast bullet shooting, would switching to a .432 bullet cure the problem?
Would a .432 bullet shoot that much better?
All bullets were lubed with Paco Kelly's Blue Apache.
9.6 grains of Unique at about 1125 feet per second.
 

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The Hog Whisperer (Administrator)
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Well, ideally you would want to slug all points that the bullet has to pass through. But the cylinder throats are probably the most critical, so I can see the point of their advice.

Look at the rifling, not just the patches, if you can see a visible lead build-up, then perhaps action is warranted.

Sometimes tweaking the powder charge up or down a little does wonders as far as reducing lead fouling.

Every Ruger revolver barrel that I have looked at has been rough. Some lapping might do it a world of good. And yes I shoot 0.432" bullets in all Ruger .44s. But your loads may work with 0.430" bullets with some load changes, or lappin or both.

Personally I don't lose a lot of sleep over a little lead fouling anyway.
 

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Going to look at this in two parts.

With an optimum load, the bullet will upset in the cylinder to whatever the cylinder mouth diameter..in your cse .432". If undersize bullets are used, they are either bumped up (if pressure is high enough) or not (if pressure is lower than the yield point of the bullet alloy).

Part1: If the pressure is high enough to bump up the bullet alloy, would be better to be as close to .432" as possible so as to promote eveness. It's going to get to be .432" by the ti9me it gets to the end of the cylinder, so may as well start it out near that size.

Part 2: If the pressure is lower than the yield strength of your alloy (and your load sounds close to this), then the bullet is going to be (1) off center by the time it exits the cylinder mouth (2) eroded by the gas that squeezes past the .002" gap at the base. Both promote leading.

Can increase the pressure for that alloy or soften the alloy for that pressure level...your choice, but don't exceed presure limits if you choose the first course.
 

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I'll second Ribbonstones reccomendation. If your bullets cast at .430 and your cylinder throats are .432, you should probably soften up you alloy so it bumps up to fill the extra diameter. If that doesn't work, it's time for a new mould. Or you could just get your exercise cleaning the bore if the accuracy is good. It would try the softer alloy at current pressure levels before I tried to expand the harder undersize bullet with more pressure.
 

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All pertinent suggestions. If the above tactics don't yeild acceptable results, rather than buying a new mold, you might consider simply lapping the cavities in the mold you have so that they will throw .432"+ diameter bullets! It's simple, cheap, and beats buying another mold if not necessary.

It's always better to have bullets that snugly fit the chamber throats of a revolver rather than rely on bullet obturation.

Just a thought!

God Bless,

Marshall
 

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Just a thought, as you've gotten some good responces...if they can't be matching, would much rather shoot a revolver with a cylinder diameter slightly larger than bore diameter than the other way arround.
 

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Something to look at , multiplying the hardness of you bullet, in bhn, by 1422 will tell you what pressure, (in psi), is needed for the bullet to properly obturate. Example- a bhn of 12 X 1422 = 17064 psi. Choose your loads accordingly. Wanna see something scary? 22(bhn)X 1422 = 31284 psi!!! No wonder we see complaints of 22 bhn bullets suffering from gas cutting in 45 ACPs. This not an absoloute formula, but a very good rule of thumb. Let the flames begin... ==Bob
 
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