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G-day all,new to the forum and happy to be here.:)
I've been away from the sport for a while and I'm picking up on new things all the time thanks to reading here.

Recently purchased a new Weatherby Vanguard blue/synthetic in .243,Leupold VX-1 4-12 x 40 scope. First thing I did was go out and mount a quality Bi-pod following a mates advice who is a seasoned hunter and bl**dy good shot.
Thing is when I'm shooting paper at 100 yd's prone off sand bags I can acheive a consistent 1 1/2 group an inch above centre. ( winchester power softs in 100G / factory loads )with a cool to warm barrel.:D
Using the same bullets,distance and prone using the bipod,the best I can do is a 3 inch group and will almost always have a stray hit well away from where I'm pointing:eek:
I find when using the bipod there is noticebly more movement when firing resulting in poor groups.
Hunting is the only sport I currently undertake with the rifle and was looking for advice on improving my accuracy in the field off the bipod.
Has anybody had a similar experience using them? naturally practise and technique is the number one solution but just curious of any hints or tips out there.;)
 

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First thing is to make sure the bipod is not causing contact between the barrel and the forearm of the weapon. Some forearms are not stiff enough to work well with a bipod. I'm not familiar with your rifle so I don't know if this is your case or not. Assuming this is not your problem. Make sure you have your body behind your stock and not way off to the side. Are you using a bag at the rear of the stock? If not this will make a hug difference. You can also use your off hand by sliding it under the armpit of your shooting arm and resting the heel of the stock in the web of your hand. There are a couple of other ways too and I'm sure some others will make some suggestions but using a rear bag along with your bipod is going to be the sturdiest.
 

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Is your bi-pod spring loaded? If so you may be pushing down slightly when pulling the trigger just enough to throw your shot off vs. a rigid rest such as bags.
 

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Welcome to the forum. Rules are to join in, have fun, and play nicely with the rest of us kids.

Range Junkie called the issue I had with my first bipod. Some of the synthetic stocks can be whippy. I wound up with bluing wear on the underside of the barrel of my Savage 10FP (pre-AccuStock) to illustrate that point, so I would check for that. If it's an issue, you might want to experiment with "O'Conner bedding", as Harold Vaughn puts it. You set the gun on a bench so it is supported by a bag under the magazine housing and dangle a 15-20 lb weight off the front end (the bipod might be good for anchoring that). Wedge some paper matchsticks or some 1/4" wide card stock in between the barrel and the tip of the forestock on either side, about 90 to 120 degrees apart. Release the weight and see how it shoots? If you like what you've done, wax the barrel with Johnson's paste wax and apply epoxy to stick the wedges permanently into place. You want to let it set up with the weight dangling off the front end, so you'll need to set up your workbench at home to let you do that.

This bedding method is reported by Harold Vaughn to be the only one that consistently improves sporter weight rifle accuracy. Its critics point out it can lead to shifting POI with temperature and humidity, but that is in a wood stock, and yours shouldn't swell with moisture. If your barrel has asymmetrical stress, the method may cause it to walk as it heats up. This is why it needs to be tested before gluing. Don't be surprised if the bipod shifts POI a bit, though the idea is the preloading by the bedding will limit that. If it occurs, it should be consistent so you can find the shift in your scope and compensate.

 

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Nice pic! Thanks well put, UN!
 

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Discussion Starter #7
hmmmm .. the 'O Connor Bedding' is an interesting concept.
Also got some advice from a buddy at work,his suggestion was to add some extra "cushion" as he put it between the stock and Bi-pod mount.The theory is it will absorb some of the recoil before transferring it into the ground through the Bipod and therefore reduce the "bounce"
Some good advice all round,I'll give a few things a go and see where we end up.
 

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G'day mate,

weatherby's have upward pressure on the barrel already from the synthetic stock, which is also flexible, maybe the bipod exerting pressure on the fore end of the stock is enough to increase upward pressure on the barrel and bugger your groups up.
Just a suggestion. I've used bipods on my Ruger and Tikka with free floating barrels and can't detect a noticible increase in group size. Good luck.
 

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Ah! Didn't know that about the Weatherby synthetics. Probably tells the tale. Crusty, two opposite approaches come to mind, then: One is to increase the preloading pressure a bit by adding some business card stock between the barrel and that existing contact? You can find the location of the contact by holding a dollar bill under the barrel like a sling and sliding it back until it stops. You could also take the opposite tack and float the barrel, eliminating that contact? Somebody used to make tuning screws in place of the matchsticks I mentioned. They could be adjusted for pressure. If you floated the barrel and installed Nylon tipped adjustment screws, that would let you experiment with the effect of the bipod with and without barrel contact pressure?
 
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