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Discussion Starter #1
Last Christmas I got a loading press and since winter has passed on I am just now getting around to getting the bench set up. The only place I have to set it up is in my garage which is attached to my house. We live in an area that does have temperatures that may reach in the single digits for a few weeks but it does not get too hot in the summer. My point is my garage is not climate controlled in any way. My water service comes in the garage without problems so it doesn't get below freezing in there. My question is this: is there a temperature range at which powder should be stored? Since part of our basement is underground I do have to run dehumidifiers in the finished part and sometimes in the garage if our doors won't be opened for a few days. I have some friends that load and have a similar setup. A couple of them say they don't worry about controlling the temp in their garages because it stays between 45 and 70 or so and to just make sure the powder containers are sealed tight. I have some others that say I need to install a heater at least to keep the temp in smaller range.

Advice?
 

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Your friends are correct. As you might imagine, something the army carries around in loaded ammo in Antarctic or desert conditions doesn't go bad easily.

The main thing is to avoid condensation on the powder or the sides of a powder measuring tool. It is therefore probably best to load toward evening when the powder and tools are warmer than the outside rather than the reverse.
 

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Piney Woods Moderator
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Riflefan, I have several pounds of powder that are over 30 years old and have been stored everywhere from a barn to a garage without any type of temperature control. I am still using them for loading. Most powder will last as long as it is kept dry.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
That is what I thought I just wanted to make sure. Now I can spend that money on my bench instead of putting a heater in there. I already have my 30-06 dies so I am going to use those to start with. I couldn't think of a better cartridge to learn on.

Thanks for the input.
 

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I keep all my reloading equipment (powder, primers, & such) in my reloading room located in my basement. The temp. is always 68 degrees & low humidity year round, as the basement is underground.:)
 

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I am still using WWII surplus H4831 powder I bought (for $1.50 a pound) in 1968. The powder is now at least 65 years old, and since I got it has been stored in sealed gallon cans in unheated garages. It still looks, smells and shoots like new.
 

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Cold would almost certainly do no harm to the powders. Heat....Well within reason it should be fine. I would think if it's not too hot for you to be in, the powder would be fine as well. Like what the others said, moisture is the enemy.

You might perhaps keep the silca gel packets that come with other products and put them with your powder to absorb what little remaining moisture there is in the bottle after closing the lids. You can also "recharge" the packets by warming them up in an oven from what I have read.
 

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I keep both powder and primers (separated) in the house where it's cool and dry. Seems to keep very well this way.
I'm with Marshall Kane on this one. If it makes you nervous, grab a pair of the Mil Surplus 40mm Cannon ammo carriers. I use two for powders, and three of the 5.56 ammo carriers for primers. They are designed to keep moisture out, and minimize the effects of cooking off in case of a fire. I throw a set of silica bags in every couple of years, just for insurance. They hold about 20lbs of powder, or so.
 
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