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By Alox do you mean liquid Alox? If so, when you sized your bullets you removed the alox from the areas where it's needed. Just relube after sizing.
You can also put some of your RCBS lube into the grooves by hand before you size with the Lee die. This will let you try a different lube and lube method for a few rounds without having to set up your lubrisizer.
Is .429 the correct size for your pistol? If .429 is undersize for your bore, with the hard alloy you're using you may get leading. Try a few unsized or sized to .430, .431, etc. You could also slug your bore, forcing cone, and throats to get an idea what diameter your bullets should be.
Have you tried the wheelweight alloy without the water drop? A slightly softer alloy might work better by sealing the bore a little better. How much tin are you adding to your alloy? Only a couple of percent by weight is necessary to ease fillout.
Do you have a rough bore? Firelapping would be a last resort but you might try firing a hundred jacketed rounds to smooth things out.
Buy or borrow a chronograph so you're not guessing at the velocity. The last batch of 2400 I bought was very fast. Even using standard primers, I ended up having to back off to 18.5 grains to get a safe load in one of my pistols. Previously I had been able to use 21 grains with the same components. You might try backing off your powder charge a couple of grains.
 

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As a general rule I like a tight slip fit through the throats. With my decidedly older Smith and Wesson and Ruger revolvers that comes to .430 bullet diameter.
I use the same method of firing a cylinder full of jacketed rounds to get most of the lead out. Otherwise, some bronze wool wrapped around a worn bore brush will scrape out the most stubborn leading.
I don't like to mix bore cleaners. You can get some strange tertiary compounds that may damage your bore. You might want to pick one and stick with it (my vote is for Hoppe's :) ).
 

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Actually, your leading doesn't sound that severe- but I do like to minimize the lead, myself.
New barrels tend to be rough. It's after some use that the machine and tool marks tend to smooth out. Unless the barrel gets badly pitted (usually from corrosion), more shooting will make for a smoother barrel.
 
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