Shooters Forum banner

1 - 20 of 23 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
6 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Hey guys, Ive got a couple questions about a recently aquired remington model 11. I got this gun very cheap and havent gotten a chance to shoot it yet, but according to the seller it has problems feeding shells out of the magazine. Apparently it shoots fine and will cycle shells by hand, but wont completely cycle when shooting it. Anybody have any experience with these guns that has any suggestions would be great. Im going to tear it apart one of these days and clean it all up to see if that helps. Also, is it safe to shoot some of the heavier loads in this gun? I have heard that you have to be careful what you shoot in some of the older guns. The serial number is 13***. thanks
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
867 Posts
Could be the shell stop, but I kinda doubt it. First off, let me say that there is no such thing as "high brass" or "low brass" loads in case someone uses those terms. You have trap or low power loads and field or high power. That having been said, you need to know what power level you are shooting. What I'm leading up to is how the friction ring is set, this can affect the cycling of the gun. For low power loads you have the bronze ring, taper forward, then the spring, then the steel ring last to keep from losing it. For field loads, from the front end you will have the bronze ring, then the steel ring taper forward, then the spring. Also, and very important is lubrication. You cannot soak it down, as the friction ring won't work, neither can you leave it dry. Clean the mag tube, then wipe it down with a tiny dab of gun grease on a dry rag, or you can use a couple drops of 30wt motor oil wiped off with a dry rag. Oh, by the way, make sure the gap in the bronze ring and the gap in the steel spring around it are aligned, otherwise the bronze ring won't work. Here endeth the lesson. Goatwhiskers the Elder
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
thanks goatwhiskers. I'll have to take it apart, clean it up, and take a look at and maybe replace the friction ring. The gun is a little rough, but for $50, I dont think I did too bad, even if it does need a little fixing.
 

·
Piney Woods Moderator
Joined
·
6,254 Posts
Goatwhiskers hit the nail on the head. I have a Remington Model 11 that belonged to my dad. You defiantly have to have the recoil rings in the right order or it will not function correctly. Beware, with heavy loads, it kicks like a mule.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
846 Posts
Thanks for the lesson Goatwhiskers.I had forgotten the ring sequences and I appreciate the info.I have My Grandfathers Model 11 and it has always been one of my favorite guns.I used it alot when I was a kid.And Jodum is right about recoil with heavy loads.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,623 Posts
That's what I'll check first also. The Remington 11 is just a US licensed copy of the Browning A5.

CD
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
846 Posts
Part of the agreement was Model 11's could not use the magazine cutoff of the Browning Models ,The bolts are just a tiny bit shorter and the fireing pins will not interchange.Also Savage was licensed to make a similar shotgun but I forget the model designation.I believe Model 11 production ceased in 1949
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
7,606 Posts
j smith,
Goatwhiskers covered things quite well. I'll add - or reinforce - a few items from experience with the A-5's, and Mod 11.

1. MOST problems with cycling I've seen were due to a dirty action and recoil spring/friction ring, etc. Tear the gun down and give it a thorough cleaning, and lube as Goatwhiskers recommends. I find that a set of plastic "cleaning picks" (from Midway or elsewhere are really useful in cleaning these guns. I've never had a need to tear down the trigger mechanism.

2. I caution you to NOT remove the rearmost keeper screw and main screw on the lower tang. This holds a flat spring and it is not necessary to take this apart unless you have some bad rusting on those internal parts. It's just a pain to get back in without the right tools. Here's a pic that shows these screws, closest to the flat pistol grip. The next screw forward is the screw that secures the stock between the upper and lower tang. This one you do want to take out.

Here's another pic with the forearm removed, showing the recoil spring, brass friction ring, and forcing ring, bottom to top.


3. Pay attention to how everything comes apart, and goes back together in reverse! The side screws and main screws in the side of the receiver; these are identical on each side of the A-5, and interchangeable, but it's been awhile since I've torn down the Mod 11 so I don't know if they're identical. I've had a few trying moments without a manual, and luckily had another unassembled gun to look at to find where I was doing wrong.

4. Twist a rag (with solvent) through the inside of the recoil spring too. This gets gunk buildup.

5. Clean the inside of the forearm! This tends to get a lot of grease and powder buildup and could be hindering the whole recoil motion, even if everything else is spotless. Also, check if there are any rub spots on the inside of the forearm. The forearm could warp to where the recoil parts are rubbing on the inside of the forearm. Here's a pic of my not-so-clean forearm inside!


6. When you reassemble the action into the buttstock, make sure before you tighten everything down, the tangs are butted into the stock recesses tightly.

These are great guns, and durable. Good luck.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,623 Posts
Believe it was the Savage model 720 which was the Browning A5/Remington 11 copy.

CD
 

·
Nawth East Moderatah
Joined
·
5,463 Posts
Also;

When i had mine, the bolt cracked. The reason the bolt cracked was that at the farthest back position on a model 11 there is a fiber wad/washer of sort that keeps the bolt from slamming back into the receiver.

mine was obliterated, and as such, I had to replace it, the rivet that holds it, and the bolt.

I have extras should someone need.


It was a good shotgun, but I traded it for 1000 rounds of Lake city 5.56 AR food....

 

·
Registered
Joined
·
867 Posts
Shawn, not picking on you, but a couple of things. The rearmost screw with a locking screw is what holds the butt on. The one you spoke of that holds a flat spring is closest to the trigger guard, but I think you knew that. The other thing I wanted to mention is the assembly of the friction mechanism. For high power loads you should have first the friction ring, then the steel ring, then the recoil spring. For trap loads you put the steel ring under the spring to keep from losing it. By the way, line up the gap in the bronze friction piece and the spring wrapped around it. Your friction ring doesn't work as it shows in the picture. Have a great day. Goatwhiskers the Elder:D
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
463 Posts
Be careful with the coil springs inside the gun and be sure you get them back in in the same order, i dismantled one and swapped the position of two springs that were very similar spent over an hour trying to figure out why the darn thing wouldn't work.

P.S. I'm jealous as can be $50!!! you practically stole that gun!
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
7,606 Posts
Shawn, not picking on you, but a couple of things. The rearmost screw with a locking screw is what holds the butt on. The one you spoke of that holds a flat spring is closest to the trigger guard, but I think you knew that. The other thing I wanted to mention is the assembly of the friction mechanism. For high power loads you should have first the friction ring, then the steel ring, then the recoil spring. For trap loads you put the steel ring under the spring to keep from losing it. By the way, line up the gap in the bronze friction piece and the spring wrapped around it. Your friction ring doesn't work as it shows in the picture. Have a great day. Goatwhiskers the Elder:D
Good grief, now I'm going to have to take everything apart again to refresh my feeble memory. I don't feel picked on Goatwhiskers and am glad you and others can correct the misinformation. Might have to assemble a 'how-to' for the A-5's/Mod 11's, with member input, since there seems to be a steady stream of questions on these fine shotguns.
 

·
Nawth East Moderatah
Joined
·
5,463 Posts
Shawn et al;

I may have a copy of the disassembly/re-assembly instructions somewhere in my archives, down in the bunker.

If someone needs them, I could forward them.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
7,606 Posts
Shawn et al;

I may have a copy of the disassembly/re-assembly instructions somewhere in my archives, down in the bunker.

If someone needs them, I could forward them.
Thx Chris. I do think I have an A-5 manual stuffed away somewhere here, just have to find it. I may get one from Rem too and eventually do a writeup with pics.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1 Posts
I just bought an old mod 11. Could someone send me a picture of both sides of the receiver. There is a screw missing on the left side. The hole show the side of the bolt. Seems to shoot and cycle good. The blue is completely worn off but the furniture is solid. Who sells parts for the 11.

Thanks,
Mike n Tn
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
7,606 Posts
I just bought an old mod 11. Could someone send me a picture of both sides of the receiver. There is a screw missing on the left side. The hole show the side of the bolt. Seems to shoot and cycle good. The blue is completely worn off but the furniture is solid. Who sells parts for the 11.

Thanks,
Mike n Tn
I had a Mod 11, but it's currently at the sheriff's office due to an unplanned catastrophic disassembly. But if I remember correctly, the Mod 11 does not have the small keeper screws to hold the main screws in place; I could be wrong there, and if so, the gun would operate without the keeper screws. Regardless, the main screws (they hold the pivot point of the feed ramp) are too far back for you to be seeing the bolt I think. This I get from looking at the Browning Auto-5's I still have.

There is a very small (1/16"?) hole in the left side of all the Browning A-5's, about 2/5's the full length of the receiver, from the front of the receiver. It is just a hole; don't know if it's part of the manufacturing process?? All 3 A-5's don't have a screw in there. One of the A-5's looks like it DID have a screw there at one time. May have been part of the manufacturing process.

Can you post a pic of your action?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
867 Posts
The little hole you speak of in the left side of the frame does not have a screw in it. If you look there is a small cutout in the right side where the bolt handle slides back and forth that is in line with the little hole in question. When doing a total disassembly you put a punch thru the hole and tap out the latch pin in the bolt so that you can remove the bolt. Note that the pin has a small flat that must be correctly aligned upon reassembly. Goatwhiskers the Elder
 
1 - 20 of 23 Posts
Top