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Discussion Starter #1
Guys,

My 7 & 1/2" .44 Super Blackhawk shoots everything high - about 5-6" at 25 yds. with slower 240 and 250 gr. lead, 4" or so with the lighter/faster jacketed 200 & 210"s at near max. Even gripping it pretty firmly. Even with rear sight all the way down.

So I can either remember to hold low on everything, or I need to somehow add 1/16" or so to the front sight. The proper way I suppose would be to silver solder a piece of steel on top, but if I can come up with something easier, I'd prefer it. I wish somebody made some square fiber-optic pieces that I could JB weld on top.

I'm thinking of JB welding a thickness or two of credit card just to verify the height I need to add.

I could use a smart idea … or somebody help me avoid making a terrible mistake....
 

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It is not difficult to make a new blade for the rear sight and make it "shorter".
Can you find a new front sight that is higher? They screw on, right?
 

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JB Weld is a great way to experiment. All you need is a piece of 1/8" brazing rod to file to width and epoxy on the existing blade. Lightly file both surfaces and DON'T TOUCH them before applying epoxy by rubbing it in on both surfaces, then putting them together. A bit of clear fingernail polish (lacquer) will preserver the fresh brass color, at least for a little while after final shape and polish.

You can calculate exactly how much you need with this simple formula-

Multiply the distance you want to MOVE point of impact by the distance between front and rear sight (Sight radius) and divide the product by the range in inches.

Fer instance-- Your sight radius is 10.5 inches and you're shooting 5 inches high at 50 yards. 10.5 x 5 = 52.5/ 1800 = .029" added to the front sight will zero the gun.

I'd add about .040 to the front sight so you get some adjustments back at the rear sight.
 

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While the OP can purchase a spare rear sight blade and try filing it down, removing 1/16” may not leave enough blade to deepen the notch enough. The front sight is permanently attached on the blued model, pinned on the stainless version.


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Elk Whisperer (Super Moderator)
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JB Weld is pretty "permanent" and is FUGGLY when all done, maybe a clear epoxy to " fasten" a piece of the appropriate sized key stock the width of front sight blade, which should be more than ample to "lower" the OP's groups so that he will actually need to raise his rear sight and give him back some adjustment.

OR order a vee notch rear sight from Ruger, "grind" the original blade down so it's 1/32" wide and silver solder a piece of 1/16" brass rod to the top and PRESTO!!! Instant Ruger Express Sights, which by design, will lower the POI.

Film at 23:00

RJ
 

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What's the thickness of the front blade? Most hobby shops have a selection of 'glow worm' sight rods. The problem is finding the right size.
ebay #301889126993 is 3/16 (.187) dia and yellow but you get the idea.

Epoxy is not supposed to show. :rolleyes: Fit the parts right and nobody knows what magic holds something together. ;)
 

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You can calculate exactly how much you need with this simple formula-

Multiply the distance you want to MOVE point of impact by the distance between front and rear sight (Sight radius) and divide the product by the range in inches.

Fer instance-- Your sight radius is 10.5 inches and you're shooting 5 inches high at 50 yards. 10.5 x 5 = 52.5/ 1800 = .029" added to the front sight will zero the gun.

I'd add about .040 to the front sight so you get some adjustments back at the rear sight.
That will come in handy ;)
 

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Discussion Starter #8
There's not enough of the rear sight blade to grind down and have a usable notch. Also, the front sight is evidently silver-soldered on (not screwed)-so not easily replaced. It ramped and serrated, with only a small flat portion on top.

I'll probably put on a little more than I need, so I can raise the rear sight and have some range of adjustment.

didn't know about the "glow worm" sight rod. I'll measure the blade width and check some shops (if they're open)
 

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The Hog Whisperer (Administrator)
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You could also get a replacement insert for the rear sight, and file it down (and deepen the notch as well). That might be less trouble.
 

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Where I work we have given up on using JB Weld because of the look of the finished product. What we're using is DP125 from 3M. It's a clear epoxy. It's not cheap, but it bonds to metal, plastic, glass, and just about everything else. Killer stuff. If there's a down side to it, it's the cure time. Once applied and everything's aligned and the excess cleaned up, leave it sit for a few days.

We use it to repair parts that are handled a lot and I don't recall any repairs that have let loose.

I'm sure when the previous posts mention epoxy, they're probably referring to a similar product. I only bring it up because when someone mentions epoxy, my mind sees to the WalMart glue shelf. If I mix regular epoxy on a scrap plastic or metal I can typically remove the cured glue with a fingernail. With the DP125 that ain't happening.
 

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Elk Whisperer (Super Moderator)
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You could also get a replacement insert for the rear sight, and file it down (and deepen the notch as well). That might be less trouble.
That works to a certain extent. My Old Army had the same problem but the rear sight base got in the way so eventually I added keystock to the front ramp the carefully filed it down to get it to where I had the rear sight about halfway in its travel.

RJ
 
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J Belk you've done it again. Thanks for the formula. I should start a J Belk notes section in my "Big Book of Knowledge ".
 

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Discussion Starter #13
the front sight blade on the SBH (early new model) is 0.12".
I'm about 5" high at 25 yds., so using JBelk's formula, I need to add about .06 ".

(I'm sort of a nerd, so I made an excel spreadsheet for future calculations...)
 

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Discussion Starter #14
while I'm confessing, I've also got spreadsheets for the cost of all my reloads, the deer I've shot by county, sex, time of day, and gun and bullet used, ground or stand. Just for fun, I made one applying the Taylor Knockout formula to all the loads I shoot.

For years, I kept notes by hand on every batch of reloads and how it shot. And I still do while I'm developing a load for a particular gun. Once I settle on a load, I just write it on each box.

I'm not really OCD, just careful....
 

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Ever think of sending it back to Ruger? Let them put another front sight on it. I had to do that with a Vaquero. Of course, my sight fell off. But the turn-a-round time was pretty fast. I only mention this because you would have the original look and Ruger's customer service appears to be pretty amiable.

By the way, they checked the gun thoroughly and re-tuned it while they had it.

On Edit: Fed-Ex was supposed to deliver some bullets for me yesterday. The guy drove the truck to my driveway, then spent a good 20 minutes inside. I could hear boxes banging around. Sounded like he was having a fight in there. Eventually he came out and said my order never made it to the truck. He also said that they were somewhat short handed and it was chaos in the shipping industry right now. I know that things I once received in three days now take over a week. But, they are working and that is something good.
 

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I'll confess I've never seen a spread sheet much less made one and I've never written down any load for any rifle I've ever owned. I work up a load and it resides in my head until next time. I loaded .222 Rem yesterday with a load developed in 1960. It still works, too.

So your sight is 1/8 wide and you need a 1/16 more height. A vice, file and piece of 1/8 keystock and a dab of epoxy and cold blue would have that job done in 20 minutes, plus curing time.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
Not a bad thought, 1 Calicocat. I've sent 2 guns to Ruger over the years - a single six for the transfer bar upgrade (which I later removed because I hated the trigger, and put the original parts back in) and my Redhawk to have a scope-able barrel put on. both times the experience was satisfactory.
If this were my only .44, I might do it, but this is just a plane-jane gun. It's fairly accurate, but not a tack-driver. I got it mostly to shoot single action revolvers with my son, who has a blackhawk, and occasional carry in a nylon shoulder holder in a deer stand. I picked it up pretty cheap in a pawn shop - I think the former owner didn't like the way it shot. It hadn't been shot much, but the rear sight was screwed down all the way, to the point that the adjustment screw lightly rubbed the cylinder (!)
My big concern is the proper shape of the front sight, and that it's durable enough to withstand going in and out of the holster, or an occasional bump.
 

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The Hog Whisperer (Administrator)
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Key stock = long square bars of metal. Common in the machine shop industry. Since they are already square, all you'd need to do is cut to length.

Or with enough time and ambition, you could file your own out of a scrap of 10 gage plate....
 

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The Shadow (Super Mod)
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"key stock" - not something I'm familiar with or have access to.
If you have access to a farm store, or bearing house, you have access to them. Even most hardware stores have chunks of them.

Cheers
 
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