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I agree about the JB (really good epoxy with jagged metallic 'dust' added)
File both surfaces, DON'T TOUCH with anything.
MIX the epoxy twice as long as it takes to get bored of mixing, then use ONLY the totally mixed portion to RUB into both surfaces to break surface tension. Then, put the parts together with a little pressure. a wrap of surgical tubing or held between padded vise jaws.
Properly done epoxy joints are as strong as the soft solder used to hold shotgun barrels together, about 8.5kpsi.
 

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Discussion Starter #42
JB "Quick" is what I had. If this doesn't hold, I'll get the real stuff. I suppose even if I have to wear a mask to go into WalMart to get it....
 

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Remove the existing sight, or mill a dovetail?





The front sight on my old SBH got buggered up pretty good from falling on a rock from horseback height. Took it to a local GS had it filed flat (the big flat part that's silver soldered on the barrel) cut a dovetail and installed a taller than "normal" blade so I could file it to where it (I) need it to be. (It's actually very close as is) Mine also shot very high with the factory front sight. He did an excellent job, you have to look really close to actually see the dovetail he cut and the fit of the blade was superb. It really looks as good or better than original. Charged me 20 bucks. He had the gun for 4 months while it did it, but he did do a fine job.
 

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The front sight on my old SBH got buggered up pretty good from falling on a rock from horseback height. Took it to a local GS had it filed flat (the big flat part that's silver soldered on the barrel) cut a dovetail and installed a taller than "normal" blade so I could file it to where it (I) need it to be.
Thanks for that info, I think my "local Gunsmith" may have unlocked his door. I just couldn't glue a chunk of keystock on my trusty 'ole SBH.
 

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Discussion Starter #45
quick trip to range yesterday after work. The sight held, and it's grouping just about where I need it to be. Doesn't look too bad, either. But the dovetailed sight sounds great. $20 (!) - he must have been a good friend.
 

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I went back and checked the receipt. It was $40.00, sorry about the mistake. For the work quality he did I would have been happy if it had been twice that. I live in very rural America and this fellow is a fairly young former Marine (I'm 73 so fairly young is subjective) that does his armory work in a shop at his home. He's about 5 miles outside of our small community. Former Marine, country boy, flies a big American flag outside his home, belongs to our local American Legion (small) has good equipment in his shop, does good work and is well thought of in our community. He's third generation local. What's not to like there. I'm twelve miles away and consider him a neighbor and a good acquaintance.
 

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It's good to know you have a good 'smith locally. Dovetails are one of those aggravating jobs that's hard to get right. Cutting light tight dovetails was part of the 'precision fitting' part of gunsmithing school, but it caused so many wash-outs the requirement was dropped many years ago.
 

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JBelk,
That really surprises me. I have cut dovetails on a few of my own projects using nothing more than a triangular file. (we called them tri-square) It is a tedious job but I never thought it hard enough that a novice couldn't do it.
 

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Elk Whisperer (Super Moderator)
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I did one on the barrel of my muzzleloader some 45 years ago with a triangle file. When I got close Dad ground the teeth off one side.

Used the rear buckhorn off a '94 Winchester. Elevation adjustment was made with the pull tab pop top out of a can of Shasta grape soda. Both are still there :D

RJ
 
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ShooterPaul--

The metal fitting projects took about 100 hours for most students to complete.
The first was the Knock-out Block. Two pieces of 1/8" thick x 2 x 2 inches was issued. The first piece was filed to exactly one inch square. That square had to be set in the middle of the second piece so that when pushed in flush, no light could be seen through any seam but the inside block could be pushed through by finger pressure. "Light tight, finger tight".

The second was the dovetail which started with the same two pieces of 1/8x 2 x 2 steel but a male and female dovetail was cut in the ends so the two mated together light tight and finger tight.

The third was a six inch section of octagon 'barrel' stock. The task was to cut two dovetails, four inches apart that were level with the top, square with the sides and parallel and level with each other using blank dovetail fillers. Again, light tight and finger tight.

Those three projects represented about 90% of the drop-out rate. No power tools were used.

A guy sat in the next row over from me and closer to a big plate glass window. He submitted his 18th knockout block to the instructor who pointed to a gap in one side. I saw him shake his head. The student took back the project and flung it perfectly centered through the plate glass window and walked out. Tool box still open and all. We never saw him again.
 

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Discussion Starter #51
from JBelk's post: "A guy sat in the next row over from me and closer to a big plate glass window. He submitted his 18th knockout block to the instructor who pointed to a gap in one side. I saw him shake his head. The student took back the project and flung it perfectly centered through the plate glass window and walked out. Tool box still open and all. We never saw him again. "

perhaps he went on to a career in baseball (?)
 

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As a life long gunsmithing "Bubba" I've cut lots of sight dovetails with hacksaw, and three corner file. They worked well enough but were far from "light tight" things of beauty. The milling machine is a wonderful tool.
 

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JBelk,
I think that guy was the one who fixed the loose front sight on my 03A3. When I picked up the rifle the "smith" had drilled a hole between the sight blade and mount and drove a pin between them. I should have done the job myself. ;)
 

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Discussion Starter #54
Evidently roughing both surfaces slightly and applying the JB Weld directly to both did the trick - the front sight addition has held through a couple trips to the range. At the same time, I've been working on a Unique Load with a 240 gr. LSWC. I know that's sort of like re-inventing the wheel, but it's fun. I started mild, with 6.7 and 7, then 7.3. Accuracy was ho-hum, but at 7.5, the groups tightened noticeably and in both guns (SBH & Redhawk) from about 2.5" to about 1.25" at 25). I'll bump it up a little more to 8 or 8.5 , and see if it tightens up more. . I think I'm on the bottom edge of a sort of "sweet spot" - I see a lot of guys recommend 8-10 gr. of Unique with a 240 LSWC.
 
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