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Discussion Starter #1
Indoor range.
Rule is you are expected to clean up your brass behind the firing line.
To give you an idea how they are set up for brass collection:
There are 3-4 small brooms with dust catchers all long enough to collect brass standing up. (Personally, I think the brooms don't work well on carpet, so I pick all mine up by hand).
There is a row of buckets in the back, one for each caliber.

My question is, if a shooter in the next lane is lobbing his brass behind my lane and doesn't clean up after himself, Is it my responsibility?

This happened to me the other day. I was shooting 9mm and he was shooting 45 so it was pretty obvious which was mine and which was his.

I picked up every one of mine and left his. The range master didn't say anything but I believe he gave me a bit of a look.


People's thoughts?
 

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I would have picked up the lazy guy's brass and (1.) cleaned, inspected, and used it; (2.) used it for trade bait; or (3.) sold it for scrap...

I know that in some ranges, if brass hits the floor and is left behind, it becomes the assumed property of the range.
 

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Seems to me if the rule is, police your area, then police your area. If your picking up some of your neighbors brass he's picking up some of his neighbors and the next guy is picking up some of yours and so on. What's the big deal? Going a little bit beyond what you're expected to do is a great way to make points with the RO and management.
When I go fishing I always bring home a sack of garbage left by slobs, same thing at my range. It's just the right thing to do.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
You are correct, it's not a big deal.
Under normal circumstances, sure I pick up other's here and there, but this dude was pretty bad. He left a proper mess. Undoubtedly there were much more of his behind me than mine.
And no, he definitely did not pick up mine on his side.

Upon further thought, I probably should have cleaned them up. I just have very little patience for those who are either completely oblivious to those around them and their surroundings (I'm going to give him the benefit of the doubt and assume that he didn't realize the mess he left because if he did, then he would just be an A**hole).
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Seems to me if the rule is, police your area, then police your area. If your picking up some of your neighbors brass he's picking up some of his neighbors and the next guy is picking up some of yours and so on. What's the big deal? Going a little bit beyond what you're expected to do is a great way to make points with the RO and management.
When I go fishing I always bring home a sack of garbage left by slobs, same thing at my range. It's just the right thing to do.
They have their rules posted and it doesn't say, "police your area", it says, "pick up your own brass". The operative words being, "your own."
 

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Upon further thought, I probably should have cleaned them up. I just have very little patience for those who are either completely oblivious to those around them and their surroundings (I'm going to give him the benefit of the doubt and assume that he didn't realize the mess he left because if he did, then he would just be an A**hole).
Hey joker, Don't let guys like that get under your skin, there's too many of them out there.
Life's too short. Enjoy your range time and don't sweat the small stuff.
 

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Some ranges don't want you to pick up brass. Selling scrap brass is a revenue source for them. Make sure you don't run afoul of their rules .....

But if they tell you to police your own area, yeah, it is the lazy slob who won't bother. Figure those people are a good source of free brass, if nothing else ;)
 

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At the public, outdoor rage I attend one also has to pick up all kinds of stuff!! Clay birds, paint and insecticide cans, that spray foam insulation hat shooters seem to love to shoot and leave to name a few.

Of course the range is posted -paper targets only!! What is there about that is hard to understand. We also use wooden posts w/ chicken wire for target posting.

So many dum-dums put target right on the post and shoot it all to hexx..
Last summer when I arrived a shooter was shooting a post. I called a cease fire and pointed that out to him.. He said "Oh, I never thought of that."
Perhaps I should have said "Maybe you shouldn't have a gun?"

Does that come under the rule "Know your target and what is beyond(behind) it??

Brass at this range has become very rare, 22 and some steel junk.
 

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Crazy situation here in the UK. Our scrap metal dealers will no longer accept empty, de primed brass. I could not find out why but may be someone has left a live one in there or just a live primer in one. I used to get a good price for scrap brass along with my scrap iron/steel visits it purchased a lot of powder and bullets :)

Whatever I do or visit I try my best to tidy up and leave in better condition than when I arrived. We are asked to pick up all shotgun shells on our bird shoot, but some get lazy about it, but I or my wife tidy up anyway. She likes to count the empties at the days end and remind me how much the shells cost :-( and how many birds I actually hit
:-( :-( :-(
 

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My Range is great, if You want it, Pick it up or sweep it up. I'm like a human vacuum cleaner. It's also amazing how many people drop live rounds and never pick them up. Money, Money, Money. LOL
 

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Talking about inappropriate behavior... At a nearby public shooting area, it's always a hoot to watch the brass monkeys that decide to wander around downrange on what may be a hot or cold range without regard to who is shooting, what they're shooting, or which direction someone may be shooting.

So long as they have a chance to scrounge brass, some of the brass monkeys don't give two shakes of #### about their own safety, whom they are interrupting, or what brass they are picking up. I've even seen one of the idiots attempt to pick up someone else's brass, while the shooter was actively shooting and policing his own brass. That earned one particular brass monkey a pretty solid beat-down when he refused to cease and desist.

Picking up brass is one thing, and picking up your own brass is another... But, being an idiot brass monkey is a whole different kind of malarkey.
 

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I'd not tolerate it...

Picking up brass is one thing, and picking up your own brass is another... But, being an idiot brass monkey is a whole different kind of malarkey.
I agree. I've read in these pages that pesky kids will scarf-up your brass... while it's still hot... then try to sell it back to you! What kind of bullsquish is that?? What about those guys who have wildcat cartridges, and forming is a tedious and time-consuming chore? You think they want to have buy their own brass back from these punks? Hardly!! And that's keeping it polite. I think kids who ain't shooting under the active tutelage of an adult should not be on shootin' ranges. A range is not a place for a kid to try to pick up a few bucks on my back...
 
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I realize a lot of you forum gun whizzes don't want or need to hear from another so called old time shooter with stagnant advice but here it is anyway

Been shooting Bullseye and other comp events since the early 70's which means truck loads of brass at ranges wherever I was living. Loaded anything I shot that had a primer pocket and still do from two Stars, two Hollywoods and two Lyman All-Americans. All those years on the range I never heard such bitching and sniveling about cleaning up brass, stealing another mans brass or range etiquette. Real shooters always made sure the range was left in as good as or better shape when they left. And I might add hunters always cleaned up and never left a landowner with fence damage, trash or damage to their property. But that is what I see and hear about more and more. Something has gone wrong and it's going to give us all a big black eye if we can't act decently. Everybody who shoots at a club or public range should always respect the rules. I mean the spirit of the rules which any bonehead can understand and not some legal dissection or weaseling way out. Just do the right thing.
 

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I agree. I've read in these pages that pesky kids will scarf-up your brass... while it's still hot... then try to sell it back to you... before it cools! What kind of bullsquish is that?? ..............
Outstanding! This activity is prohibited at the range I frequent! ((:)D)))
 

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There are 2 public indoor ranges nearby. One requires you to purchase your ammo from them, no handloads, and all brass is to be left on the floor. Too restrictive for my taste so I don't shoot there. The other indoor range allows you to bring your own ammo, but no handloads allowed. You can pick up your brass there if you are faster then their hired hands that sweep the floor clean every 10 minutes or so.

The public outdoor range is better in this regard (you can collect all the brass you care to and use handloads), but no retrieving targets until an R.O. calls a cold range. The best bet for me is a private range. I miss the days when I could shoot from my back porch, or the front porch for that matter.
 

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There are 2 public indoor ranges nearby. One requires you to purchase your ammo from them, no handloads, and all brass is to be left on the floor. Too restrictive for my taste so I don't shoot there. The other indoor range allows you to bring your own ammo, but no handloads allowed. You can pick up your brass there if you are faster then their hired hands that sweep the floor clean every 10 minutes or so.

The public outdoor range is better in this regard (you can collect all the brass you care to and use handloads), but no retrieving targets until an R.O. calls a cold range. The best bet for me is a private range. I miss the days when I could shoot from my back porch, or the front porch for that matter.
I still can,----But it's only a matter of time...............!
 

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Real shooters always made sure the range was left in as good as or better shape when they left. And I might add hunters always cleaned up and never left a landowner with fence damage, trash or damage to their property. But that is what I see and hear about more and more. Something has gone wrong and it's going to give us all a big black eye if we can't act decently. Everybody who shoots at a club or public range should always respect the rules.
What "went wrong" is that the children of the 1960s and 1970s had kids. These never taught their kids manners, to be polite, to police after themselves, et cetera. I see it everywhere: A young family will be in Walmart or Costco. The very young child will start screaming at a frequency high enough to shatter glass. It's beyond extremely annoying, at least to me. The young parents never tell Johnny to shut up. Same with rambunctious and disruptive behavior-- the kid just carries on and the parents say nothing. This translates itself over the years into the behavior of the kid as he matures into an adult. When I was a kid and if I acted like these punks do today, my dad would lay the back of his hand across my face with great force and considerable speed. Lessons are learned well if pain is associated with them. I ain't never been arrested and I ain't never smoked dope. The backhands and whippin's I got as a kid taught me that to get into legal trouble while I was still in my dad's house would be the minimal part of my problems...
 
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