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A few days ago I started http://www.shootersforum.com/handloading-procedures-practices/93138-load-development-45-colt-aliant-2400-a.html. I was after a velocity of about 1,000 fps and wanted to keep it under 1200 or so. Here are my results with the average velocity about 15 feet from the muzzle:

Gun: Ruger New Model Black Hawk 5 5/8 barrel
WLPP
Bullet: 255 gr LSWC

15.0 gr 866fps
15.5 gr 891fps
16.0 gr 928fps
16.5 gr 974fps
17.0 gr 1003fps
17.5 gr 1039fps
18.0 gr 1077 fps

My best group is with 17.0 grains: see attached image. Shot at 25 yards, I think I found the sweet spot.

Someone mentioned that I may see unburned powder; I found that to be true, but not sure which load it was specific to if any. There were powder kernels deposited in the body of my chronograph. Not much, but noticeable none the less.

At 18 grains the recoil was getting pretty snappy. Not quite uncomfortable for me, but a lot more felt recoil than the lighter loads. The 17.0 gr load is quite comfortable for me to shoot.

Thanks to all that responded to the original post.
 

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With the cost of powder these days, I don't see the point of using twice as much at $30/lb.
to get about the same velocity you would get using half as much of a more suitable powder, like Unique, PB, SR7625, W231, WST, etc.
 

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I hear what your saying; I was ble to score this off a guy cleaning off his bench for 15 bucks though. Figured I use it and if anyone else found themselves in th same boat, I'd make the info available.
 

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With the cost of powder these days, I don't see the point of using twice as much at $30/lb.
to get about the same velocity you would get using half as much of a more suitable powder, like Unique, PB, SR7625, W231, WST, etc.

Because the same powder can be used for milder loads, or T-REX killing loads in numerous handguns.
 

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A few days ago I started http://www.shootersforum.com/handloading-procedures-practices/93138-load-development-45-colt-aliant-2400-a.html. I was after a velocity of about 1,000 fps and wanted to keep it under 1200 or so. Here are my results with the average velocity about 15 feet from the muzzle:

Gun: Ruger New Model Black Hawk 5 5/8 barrel
WLPP
Bullet: 255 gr LSWC

15.0 gr 866fps
15.5 gr 891fps
16.0 gr 928fps
16.5 gr 974fps
17.0 gr 1003fps
17.5 gr 1039fps
18.0 gr 1077 fps

My best group is with 17.0 grains: see attached image. Shot at 25 yards, I think I found the sweet spot.

Someone mentioned that I may see unburned powder; I found that to be true, but not sure which load it was specific to if any. There were powder kernels deposited in the body of my chronograph. Not much, but noticeable none the less.

At 18 grains the recoil was getting pretty snappy. Not quite uncomfortable for me, but a lot more felt recoil than the lighter loads. The 17.0 gr load is quite comfortable for me to shoot.

Thanks to all that responded to the original post.
I do believe I made mention of my 45colt load being 17grs of 2400 under a 250gr XTP or Rainer plated FP. I also believe I mentioned getting about 1000fps out of my vaquero, and 1200fps out of my model 92.

Glad things are working out for you too.
 

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With the cost of powder these days, I don't see the point of using twice as much at $30/lb.
to get about the same velocity you would get using half as much of a more suitable powder, like Unique, PB, SR7625, W231, WST, etc.

The .45 Colt was originally a black powder cartridge. Its big and roomy as a result. Modern smokeless powders have ignition problems in those big old black powder cases. So, you have to use a powder that is very bulky and fills the case as much as possible to avoid ignition issues. Otherwise you get velocities that can vary as much as 400 fps from shot to shot. The .45 Colt is probably the king of powder position sensitive cartridges.

In order for accuracy to be good, you need consistent velocity from shot to shot. A 400 fps ES don't get the job done. That's why it makes a difference and why it requires 17 gr. of 2400. I'm using 19 gr. of 5744 for essentially the same results. 34 gr. of FFg black powder gives perfect results as far as ballistics goes, but its a pain in the butt to clean up and corrosive as ****.

See the point now?
 

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The .45 Colt is probably the king of powder position sensitive cartridges.
Not heard that before, but I have found some of the faster powders to be mediocre in my .44M loads. Perhaps the reason why. :confused: My own experience with the .45 Colt is limited to Unique and Herco and Speer swaged SWC's, which seems to be a pretty good mix.

2400 is a pretty versatile powder, if a bit on the expensive side. Much better than not shooting by a lot.
 

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Not heard that before, but I have found some of the faster powders to be mediocre in my .44M loads. Perhaps the reason why. :confused: My own experience with the .45 Colt is limited to Unique and Herco and Speer swaged SWC's, which seems to be a pretty good mix.

2400 is a pretty versatile powder, if a bit on the expensive side. Much better than not shooting by a lot.
Yeah. My original load was for hunting, so I had it jacked up to 1100 fps with a 265 WFN. I didn't notice any powder position issues. In fact, that load of 13 gr. of Blue Dot had an extremely low ES and SD. It'll cut clovers at 25 yds.

It wasn't till I decided to try to duplicate the original 1873 load in terms of bullet weight and fps that the position thing reared up and bit me. Its been a bug hunt since then trying to find a powder that will give me that. So far, 5744 has come the closest. Its become even more relevant now since I picked up a 4.2" Redhawk in .45 Colt. Losing 3" of barrel makes a huge difference in how the powder burns. Ain't this a fun game?
 
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