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Since the great .22 shortage of a few years back, I have amassed a goodly number of a variety of .22 long rifle cartridges. Today being a sunny but cold day, I decided to take some to the range. I ended up with 2 Federal, 3 Remington, 3 Aguila, and 4 CCI brands of ammo. Nothing against Winchester or any other brand, these are just the ones I could get back when .22 ammo was scarce.

I used my CZ 452 bolt gun (left handed) with 3-9 scope set at 9x. Knowing that .22 ammo is sometimes sensitive to whatever was shot prior to it, I preceded each 5 shot 50 yard group with 5 shots of the ammo to be shot in the groups as foulers. I did not clean the bore between groups. Maybe I am just lazy, but fastidious cleaning has never seemed to make a difference in .22 accuracy to me, and I loathe doing it anyway.

I shot multiple groups with each ammo type. I won’t bore you with all the numbers, but will give you a summary. My best groups were with CCI Mini-Mag 36 grain hollow points with the smallest being 0.6 inch. I had two target types: Remington Target 40 grain (green box) and Federal Target 40 grain (325 round loose pack box). The Remington was significantly better with every group and had the smallest group of 0.75 inches. The Aguila Supermaximum 30 grain also did pretty well, with its best group being 1.05 inches. Everything else but the other two Aguila loads was pretty good, with groups ranging from 1 inch (CCI Stinger 32 grain) to 2 inches (CCI Velociter 40 grain) with the Federal 36 grain value pack and Remington Golden Bullet hanging right in there.

The Aguila Sniper Sub Sonic 60 grain were another matter. At 50 yards half of them missed the entire target board, up, down, left, and right. At 25 yards, I could get a 2 inch group, but all were keyholed. They were just too long and slow for my rifle to stabilize them. And finally, the Aguila Colibri 20 grain super slow, super silent load was a washout. At 25 yards, I couldn’t get them to consistently hit the target board. At 10 yards, I still couldn’t guarantee a target board hit. Quiet, yes. Slow, definitely. Accurate, no way.

Bottom line, my CZ 452 likes the CCI 36 mini-mags the best.
 

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Congratulations on finding an ammo your rifle likes. You did just what I repeatedly recommend for 22s. Try enough brands and your rifle will really like something. Sometimes you get a surprising winner! I have a Mossberg 144LSB, a heavy long barreled Mil contract training rifle that just loves Remington JellowJackets and shoots them too well for you to believe. I can pick a Squirrel eye at 50 yards and hit it.

Gary
 

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Wowl most CZs seem to prefer SV ammo. So cool that yours like the Hi Vel ammo. Congrats. I bet that was a fun test.
 

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The wind blew so bad here today you couldn't stand to be outside, it made 45 feel like 25.
I had planned to shoot today but maybe not for a couple more weeks.
 

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Interesting Byrl.
as you know each rifle it different. I test fire 22s with a special gi ammo box, have 12-15 different types of ammo. Comment cost doesn't seem to effect the accuracy. 10-22 liked CCI Blaser best out of 14 brands.

My CZ 452 likes (of all things) Remington golden Bullet, shoots .7 at 100 yards.

I do notice that CZ rifles recommends to NOT shoot Aguila Colibri out of their rifles. I doesn't have enought power to exit on many of their rifles. CZ rifles have a smaller bore that most.
 

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Lot to lot variations make as much difference as mfg and line in inexpensive sporters. Putting racing gas in your Toyota corolla won't make it into a formula 1 car.
Also when a high velocity 22lr bullet goes down range it transitions from sonic to sub-sonic, the bullet becomes unstable momentarily and accuracy suffers. This is the reason all 22 target ammunition is loaded with a muzzle velocity lower than the speed of sound.
For small game hunting accuracy should be the goal not velocity or ft lbs of energy, the difference in wind drift and trajectory is minimal between standard velocity and high velocity. Bullet performance for varmint hunting would be another to choose the light high velocity 22 ammunition.
Recreational shooting where large quantities of bulk ammunition is put down range at cans and other non descript targets probably accounts for most of the 22lr consumption in the country, most of this occurs inside 25 yards, accuracy is secondary to price and availability because nearly all ammunition is capable of 1" at 25 yards.

With any bulk ammunition you will get a much better idea of the true accuracy by shooting a large sample of the ammunition, a full 50 rounds on one target in as short a time frame as possible, adjust the scope so the bullets impact 1.5" low of the aiming point.
 

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Knowing that .22 ammo is sometimes sensitive to whatever was shot prior to it, I preceded each 5 shot 50 yard group with 5 shots of the ammo to be shot in the groups as foulers. I did not clean the bore between groups. Maybe I am just lazy, but fastidious cleaning has never seemed to make a difference in .22 accuracy to me, and I loathe doing it anyway.
A lot of us have been indoctrinated along the lines that switching between brands/manufacturers, or even 'labels' within a brand, of 22 ammo can have an 'effect' on subsequent group size immediately following the switch. I was never told whether the 'effect' would be positive or negative, but it was always assumed to be a negative, meaning larger group size. Otherwise, why wouldn't we switch between every group fired if the group size shrank?
I, like you, decided I 'needed' to prove it to myself. Somehow, I thought by knowing, and not just hearing, it would make me a more 'self assured' competitor (no real conclusion on how that worked out for me, thought:confused:).
My 'test' was also based on a dirty bore as I had also 'heard' cleaning could/would do more harm than good, besides avoiding the chore altogether out of laziness! Unlike your test, I fired no 'fouler shots' between switching ammo, but went directly from one label to another to see what would happen. Also, rather than fire one five shot group after the switch, I fired five five shots groups in succession to get a better feel for average group size rather than rely on one group as my 'evidence' of proof.
In total, I fired five sets (brands/labels) of five shot groups at 50 yards for a total of 125 shots. I didn't particularly try to work withing any particular 'wind pattern' during the test as I didn't want to extend and drag out the shooting time to do so. I think the average group size and consistency of group size suffered as a result of rushing through the test.
My, admittedly brief and non-scientifically conducted, test indicated to me that the premise that a negative effect on group size would result from switching ammo was not a 'given'....maybe yes, but certainly not always. Here is the 'photographic proof', at least that satisfied my curiosity!;)
 

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Lot to lot variations make as much difference as mfg and line in inexpensive sporters. Putting racing gas in your Toyota corolla won't make it into a formula 1 car.
Also when a high velocity 22lr bullet goes down range it transitions from sonic to sub-sonic, the bullet becomes unstable momentarily and accuracy suffers. This is the reason all 22 target ammunition is loaded with a muzzle velocity lower than the speed of sound.
For small game hunting accuracy should be the goal not velocity or ft lbs of energy, the difference in wind drift and trajectory is minimal between standard velocity and high velocity. Bullet performance for varmint hunting would be another to choose the light high velocity 22 ammunition.
Recreational shooting where large quantities of bulk ammunition is put down range at cans and other non descript targets probably accounts for most of the 22lr consumption in the country, most of this occurs inside 25 yards, accuracy is secondary to price and availability because nearly all ammunition is capable of 1" at 25 yards.

With any bulk ammunition you will get a much better idea of the true accuracy by shooting a large sample of the ammunition, a full 50 rounds on one target in as short a time frame as possible, adjust the scope so the bullets impact 1.5" low of the aiming point.
Doesn't look like CCI got your memo. The speed of sound being 1,125 FPS, and CCI now loads these Mini-Mag "Target" rounds to 1,235 FPS.
Even with small game , the "kinetic energy" involved with any .22 caliber bullet is still important. The goal is to kill the critter and NOT just wound it so that it goes off somewhere to die. So, with kinetic energy being just as important as "shot placement", that's a very important goal. Also, at the ranges most all small game is killed, it doesn't make any sense to worry about "wind drift", right?

 

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It's much fun to blast "internet myths" completely out of the water, every once in a while. How often do we read somebody "parrot" the stories about .22 rimfire ammunition printing differently on target from lot to lot? Check this test of Norma TAC-22 out, as fired from the same CZ 455 FS rifle, with no scope adjustments involved in the testing:







Notice the 3 different Lot #'s. Three bricks of ammunition, and no scope adjustments made during this ammunition test.
My bad, I inadvertently deleted the picture of the third groups, but there will indeed be more shot this summer, with a **NEW** target rifle included.
 

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Interesting and fun besides!

Back some years now, before the obamanation, a friend and I had a "shoot out" with our respective .22 rifles and a bunch of target and match ammo, including a couple of high end Lapua, Eley tenx, some of the old Federal ammo like used in the Olympics years back, some of the higher end Wolf and a number of other target match ammos.

This shoot out was done the same day, same bench, same bags, AND ALL FIRED FROM THE SAME BOXES OF AMMO.

Jack's rifle was a Savage semi tatget single shot with a 4X scope and all groups were fired at 50yds.

I was shooting my Clark Custom 77/22 with it's Walther barrel.

Short story on the result, I was left wondering at the value of buying my outfit when the cost was compared to the cost of Jack's rifle and scope. The result was lots of nice little groups fired from both rifles, with the Savage even out doing the Clark Custom a time or two.

Move forward a year or two and we are at the same location, same rifles, but this time shooting typical "off the shelf" .22LR ammo.

That shoot out told the story and put a whole different light on the cost factor.

While the Clark Custom kept shooting nice little groups with few exceptions, the nice little groups were the exception with the Savage!

By the way, that Clark Custom passed on to my oldest son and I now have a slightly tricked out RUGER 10/22 with a Feddersen barrel that out shot the Clark.

Then, I read many times how a person must clean a barrel after an ammo change when shooting groups with a .22LR, then shoot it repeatedly to "season" the barrel with the new ammo. In a word, "Bull"!

I have seen only one time when switching ammos opened up the groups and even then within 2 - 3 shots the ammo was right back to the normal sized groups and continued to shoot the nice little groups.

Well, what did I take away from the friendly shoot outs? Barrel quality!!!!!!!!!

While almost all .22LR rifles will shoot good groups with an ammo the rifle/barrel likes, the better the barrel, the more and greater number of different ammos it will shoot well!

Crusty Deary Ol'Coot
 

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Byrl, thanks for sharing.
I was pleased that your results with CCI stingers were similar to mine. Stingers are the only non-premium ammo that my 10-22 will group under 2 1/2 inches. They group 3/4 inch in my Anschutz.
 

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Just in case anyone has never seen how a real target rifle will group at 100meters here you go. I buy standard plus for just under 500. a case so it's not expensive target ammunition, this lot was exceptional for that price point.

 

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It's much fun to blast "internet myths" completely out of the water, every once in a while. How often do we read somebody "parrot" the stories about .22 rimfire ammunition printing differently on target from lot to lot? Check this test of Norma TAC-22 out, as fired from the same CZ 455 FS rifle, with no scope adjustments involved in the testing:







Notice the 3 different Lot #'s. Three bricks of ammunition, and no scope adjustments made during this ammunition test.
It's hardly an internet myth that there are lot to lot variations in 22 ammunition velocities resulting in the bullets impacting either higher or lower on the target, your unlikely to notice it at 35meters especially from a sporter because of the group size however. There are two standard distances normally used when checking accuracy of 22 rimfires, 50 yards because that's where all the benchrest games are shot at {ARA} and 100meters the distance of the farthest target for silhouette. If anything distances are growing longer with some of the precision rifle games going to 200 yards now.
I test my pellet rifles at 25meters.
 

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Just in case anyone has never seen how a real target rifle will group at 100meters here you go. I buy standard plus for just under 500. a case so it's not expensive target ammunition, this lot was exceptional for that price point.

Did you only shoot just one group? Or, is that only the best of many? If a "real" target rifle can't repeat the group size and produce consistency, it's not worth the cost.
 

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Did you only shoot just one group? Or, is that only the best of many? If a "real" target rifle can't repeat the group size and produce consistency, it's not worth the cost.
I shot 5 five shot groups{25rds} from 4 different cases of ammunition I have, that lot/case is exceptional in that gun. That was the best group of the 5 groups from that case, if you think people including myself don't post their best groups on the forum then I'm not sure what to say to you.
The Anschutz is made for smallbore silhouette an offhand competition, the only time I shoot it off the bench is when testing different lots of ammunition to see what will be used in matches and what is for practice. I don't shoot groups until I get a good one to post on the forum, I don't recall what the other groups looked like but if you really want to see them I'll try and find it. I can tell you that case of ammunition was moved to the back of the shelf and only comes out for state matches and the nationals.
I guess a year ago when you posted the targets and made the claim that lot to lot variations in ammunition velocities didn't result in point of impact changes is what made me post the groups from my rifle. Bad lots of SK ammunition of the same type generally chronograph 20-30fps faster than good ammunition, they also group at least an inch and half higher on a 100m target. You wouldn't see that at 35yds btw.
I still believe 35yds is a little to close to test 22 ammunition for group sizes, nearly any ammunition and rifle will shoot one hole groups at that distance.
I was recently asked why I shot my pellet gun at 20yds by a person that believes even a pellet gun should be tested at 50yds.

But hey it's a free country you can shoot groups with your guns at any distance you feel is appropriate.
 

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I shot 5 five shot groups{25rds} from 4 different cases of ammunition I have, that lot/case is exceptional in that gun. That was the best group of the 5 groups from that case, if you think people including myself don't post their best groups on the forum then I'm not sure what to say to you.
The Anschutz is made for smallbore silhouette an offhand competition, the only time I shoot it off the bench is when testing different lots of ammunition to see what will be used in matches and what is for practice. I don't shoot groups until I get a good one to post on the forum, I don't recall what the other groups looked like but if you really want to see them I'll try and find it. I can tell you that case of ammunition was moved to the back of the shelf and only comes out for state matches and the nationals.
I guess a year ago when you posted the targets and made the claim that lot to lot variations in ammunition velocities didn't result in point of impact changes is what made me post the groups from my rifle. Bad lots of SK ammunition of the same type generally chronograph 20-30fps faster than good ammunition, they also group at least an inch and half higher on a 100m target. You wouldn't see that at 35yds btw.
I still believe 35yds is a little to close to test 22 ammunition for group sizes, nearly any ammunition and rifle will shoot one hole groups at that distance.
I was recently asked why I shot my pellet gun at 20yds by a person that believes even a pellet gun should be tested at 50yds.

But hey it's a free country you can shoot groups with your guns at any distance you feel is appropriate.
Well, what I have seen many other folks show on several other forums post, are the best group and then the worst, so the viewer(s) can get somewhat an idea of what the average of the groups consisted of, from any sort of rifle they were shooting. I can understand that when showing the worst group in five for a target rifle can be embarrassing for some, but it does show actuals from the testing endeavor.
I wouldn't have questioned the posting of just a single group, had you mentioned initially, what you now mention later, especially with the brand of rifle you were using.
Just as your process works for you, mine, and many others process works for us, and provides the information WE are looking for without permission from any others as to what is done. So, providing just one group does [email protected]@K somewhat suspicious.
I haven't shot a BB or pellet gun since I was 10, only because at that age I progressed into the realm of .22 rimfire and now shoot those almost exclusively, and test quite a bit of various .22 rimfire ammunition, my way. ;):



Cased .22 rimfire doesn't fit in my cupboard.
 

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It's hardly an internet myth that there are lot to lot variations in 22 ammunition velocities resulting in the bullets impacting either higher or lower on the target, your unlikely to notice it at 35meters especially from a sporter because of the group size however. There are two standard distances normally used when checking accuracy of 22 rimfires, 50 yards because that's where all the benchrest games are shot at {ARA} and 100meters the distance of the farthest target for silhouette. If anything distances are growing longer with some of the precision rifle games going to 200 yards now.
I test my pellet rifles at 25meters.
But you see, I don't give a rip as to what distances "benchrest shooters" use to test .22 rimfire ammunition. What they, or others do, doesn't govern what I choose to do.
Now that may be hard for some to swallow, but it's their problem, not mine. Comprehension seems to be difficult for some, when I mention that I START out testing testing at 35 meters (not yards which was originally posted), then if I like what I see there, then I go out further.
My, personally owned range, on MY property goes out to 200 yards. I have customers that use that distance before going out west to hunt, but I rarely shoot that far, or even .22 rimfire at 100 yards. The .22 rimfire bullet is definitely NOT designed for those distances, so I stick to what's really practical for that cartridge, which provides enjoyment for me, and if not for others.............no sweat off my boys. ;)
 

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which provides enjoyment for me, and if not for others.............no sweat off my boys. ;)
And that's really it in a "nutshell":D

I rarely hunt with a 22lr preferring either a pellet rifle or a 17hmr but when I did I thought it was a solid 60yd cartridge for that purpose.
It is far and away from anything else my favorite target handgun and rifle target cartridge because it's accurate, quiet especially with a suppressor, easy on barrels and relatively inexpensive to shoot.
As a target cartridge it's a solid 50yd from a pistol and 100m rifle cartridge maybe a little farther in a rifle, good ammunition shot from an accurate rifle will group less than moa at that distance the same standard used for centerfire rifles. To me that's evidence it's a legitimate round for that distance against steel and paper targets.
There's lots of 22 ammunition and guns out there that just aren't up to that standard and lets face the facts, the guns and ammunition that are capable of sub moa accuracy are not inexpensive and therefore not for everyone.
As an analogy I don't own a Baja 1000 truck and definitely don't have any fantasies about my Ranger being up to finishing one of those races nor do I cast aspersions on the trucks that can finish.
 
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