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Yes, it takes a while to explain, I started with the RCBS Piggy Back 1 and 11 with a 5 position tool head that loads nothing longer than 223, not easy to run out of a place to add a die and designed for the lock out die for progressive presses, I will not load on a progressive press with out a lock out die for straight wall cases or a powder checker die for bottle neck cases. When I purchased the Dillon 550B I talked to Dillon about their press and my dies, I was not going to use their dies nor was I going to load on their press without the lock out and or powder checker die. This leaves me with seating and crimping on one position or crimping after the cases are run through the press, I load more 45s than than any other cartridges and crimp most with a full length carbide sizer die separately because I have two 45s that like new commercial ammo or reloads that look like commercial ammo, cases that look like they swallowed a bullet will not feed, to that issue I am not willing to change anything because of accuracy.

Getting used to the lock out die can cause the reloader to talk to them self as in "what the ????" because without enough powder OR too much powder reloading comes to a hard stop.

F. Guffey
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I have been using this tool for the last several weeks, and will highly recomend it for use with the Dillon 550. ONce I got used to setting it up, I have had no problems, and it has saved me from a few under/over charges. Dillon is missing a marketing opportunity here!
 

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RCBS makes too kinds of powder monitoring dies. One is like the Hornady powder cop. The other one is the lockout die, and it is different. It will lock up your press if it detects an over or under charged case, so there's no way to ignore it.

Andy
 

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I forgot to mention that, when seating and crimping at once in the last station to allow the use of a powder cop or lockout die, the bullet has to be placed with the right hand instead of the left on the 550. So the right hand is feeding a case, adding a bullet, and pulling the handle. The left hand only advances the shell plate.

Not the most ergonomic of setups.

Andy
 

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I was asking if you could use the lock out die at station 3, then before advancing the shell plate, place the bullet on top of the case, then rotate the shell plate. That way you could use the left hand to place the bullet, but you'd have to be careful advancing the shell plate not to knock the bullet off.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
o.k. I get it. I have not done it that way, but I can't see why that would not work. Went to the "man cave"and had a look and there is plenty of vertical clearance to set the bullet. I have been setting the bullet at #4 with left hand. I am seated right in front of the press so I don't have a problem reaching around a little.
 

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Die Stations

On the Hornady L-N-L, all bullet and case operations are left hand and are more ergonomic and less cramped up then on the 550 and 650 (which I have used).
I have two set-ups:
St 1: insert and size case
St 2: Expand and charge case
St 3: RCBS Lock-Out Die
St 4: Visually look at powder and seat bullet
St 5: Crimp
For some cartridges, like the .38 Special 148gn wadcutter, I found that additional case mouth expansion was necessary to minimize swaging the bullet diameter during seating, so my set up is:
St 1: same
St 2: Expand case using 9mm Mak expander
St 3: "Expand" (bell mouth) and charge case
St 4: Inspect powder and seat bullet
St 5: Crimp
Then there is the Dillon 1050 that effectively has 6 die stations...
 
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