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Hello,

I'm gathering the equipment and supplies I need to begin reloading. A neighbor gave me two powder measuring devices, an RCBS Uniflow Powder Measure and an RCBS DU-O-MEASURE powder measure.

Can somebody tell me a little bit about them? Which one should I keep?

He also gave me a couple of containers with various powders. Since they have been opened I'm tempted to throw them away. Even though he assures me he's never mixed powders, I just don't think it's a good idea to use something I'm not 100%; sure of. Am I being paranoid?

I also have one RCBS Powder Measure/Piggyback Stand. Will that work with both? The box is the same color as the DU-O-Measure box.
 

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The Uniflow Powder Measure is still in production and that's a positive indicator of its usefulness, accuracy and popularity. Never heard of the Du-O-Measure by RCBS but then it could be one of there first made shortly after WWII. If that's the case it might be more of a collectors item than useful measure. I've seen some of the first presses made by them sell in the $500 range for pristine examples.

Probably smart not using the powder especially if the maker and number is unknown. Storage conditions could also be a problem.
 

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Keep 'em both, especially as it was given you by a neighbor - he's made you gifts and might feel offended if you sell it and don't pass the price back to him! If you get into loading much you'll have reason for both.

Sounds like the powder may be okay. Shake the containers well to insure it's well mixed, then pour a few tablespoons out onto a sheet of white paper. Examine the kernels to see if they appear indenticle, if you find balls mixed with flakes or tubes, etc, toss it. If it's the same, and in the original containers, use it.

The DuoMeasures sorta priced themselves out of the market in the 70s, IIRC, the other types were less costly to make. As far as can you use the same stand for both, you have it all, why not try it?
 

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du-o-measure

I have the du-o-measure bought mine new in about 1980 it was before the uniflow
i've loaded thousands of rifle and pistol with no problems. However, if you need parts they were discontinued several years ago. if you are interested in selling let me know I may need a part in a few more thousand reloads.
 

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The Uniflow Powder Measure is still in production and that's a positive indicator of its usefulness, accuracy and popularity. Never heard of the Du-O-Measure by RCBS but then it could be one of there first made shortly after WWII. If that's the case it might be more of a collectors item than useful measure. I've seen some of the first presses made by them sell in the $500 range for pristine examples.

Probably smart not using the powder especially if the maker and number is unknown. Storage conditions could also be a problem.
The duo measure powder measure is not a very old powder measure. Certainly not as old as the Uniflow, I own both. The Duo Measure contains more powder than a Uniflow, has a graduated adjustable measuring spout and is installed directly via a connecting piece of steel under a die in the press, so that after measuring the powder, you can also seat a bullet without having to change stations. It's an extremely practical measure, more accurate with some powders than others as they ALL are. I measure every charge to the tenth of a grain anyway and there's hardly ever a shot charge that doesn't need some adjustment. I also use a Dillon and measure every three or four charges for some cases more so than others. I shot competitively for years and although measuring every charge is time consuming it has paid off for me. The Duo Measure Powder Measure from RCBS has given me great service for nearly 40 years. I have a uniflow and one of the later bells and whistles that auto dispenses. I still like the duo measure as much as any newer one.
 

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Hope OP got his questioned answered!

Looks like this tread is from 2010. Hope OP has found what he needed.

This Duo-Measure was made by Ohaus. I have one complete Duo-Measure and another for parts. The measure has three ways to measure charges based on volume. I'm thinking that this measure was discontinued in the 1970's. The Uni-Flo is still with us. There are several Uniflows in use here. The following is not scientific. Often, there is a bias in favor of the brand and equipment used to start reloading. For better or worse.
 

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Old Threads-thanks

Thanks: This appearance of old threads has been a mystery. No more. This crashes another conspiracy theory.:)
 

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The duo measure powder measure is not a very old powder measure. Certainly not as old as the Uniflow, I own both. The Duo Measure contains more powder than a Uniflow, has a graduated adjustable measuring spout and is installed directly via a connecting piece of steel under a die in the press, so that after measuring the powder, you can also seat a bullet without having to change stations. It's an extremely practical measure, more accurate with some powders than others as they ALL are. I measure every charge to the tenth of a grain anyway and there's hardly ever a shot charge that doesn't need some adjustment. I also use a Dillon and measure every three or four charges for some cases more so than others. I shot competitively for years and although measuring every charge is time consuming it has paid off for me. The Duo Measure Powder Measure from RCBS has given me great service for nearly 40 years. I have a uniflow and one of the later bells and whistles that auto dispenses. I still like the duo measure as much as any newer one.
I know this thread is old and brought back, I also have both Duo-measure and the Uniflows along with Lyman, Redding etc., but still use the Duo-measure, one problem was the plastic hopper broke and some of us used soda bottles, pipe inventions to make it work and when you find them for sale that's what is mainly wrong with them But there is a company that makes a new glass hopper for them, not too expensive either. DramWorx, great company and stand up guy.

As mentioned everyone has what works for them or brand loyalty.

-Rock
 

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The versus part of this

The versus part of this: The real problem to me is tiny parts found on the Duo-Measure. The multiple adjustments are all fine and well. It works like the Lyman 55 in principle except the 55 is more compact. That is three levels of adjustment. Now the Uniflow is simple however it does need two drums to get the full range of charges. It don't think in my worst moment I could break a power reservoir on a Uniflow. Should it happen help would only be a phone call away. The Duo-Measure is a neat idea from a bygone era. Sorta like me:eek:
 

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The versus part of this: The real problem to me is tiny parts found on the Duo-Measure. The multiple adjustments are all fine and well. It works like the Lyman 55 in principle except the 55 is more compact. That is three levels of adjustment. Now the Uniflow is simple however it does need two drums to get the full range of charges. It don't think in my worst moment I could break a power reservoir on a Uniflow. Should it happen help would only be a phone call away. The Duo-Measure is a neat idea from a bygone era. Sorta like me:eek:
Decades ago I used to use a Uniflow with the micrometer. Problem is, they throw by volume and not weight
This means you ought to add a scale to check it. I moved up to Culvers which are top end, but it's still best to spot check them. Then comes the issue of extruded powders like 4064. Roughly every 10 to 12 throws, I get a bad one. I just gave up and went to an electronic thrower/scale (Gen6) and I love it. Haven't touched my Culvers in a couple of years.
 

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Uniflow and Duo-Measure Around here.

I started off with basic RCBS gear at first. A Uniflow gives good service to this day. There was no problem here using a scale and a dribbler. Rifle rounds are loaded in relatively small batches so scales and Uniflow work very will. The Uniflow is not necessarily the best. It's the measure that has been used here the longest. The Duo-Measure specimens here are painted Ohaus brown. When the first used Duo-measure appeared many years ago it was seen as a curiosity. Now my handgun cartridges are loaded on a 550B. I do remember the days when boxes of mysterious exotic loading tools came into the store from estates and the like. That's then this is now.



The new glass reservoirs are a wonderment.
 

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I know this thread is old and brought back, I also have both Duo-measure and the Uniflows along with Lyman, Redding etc., but still use the Duo-measure, one problem was the plastic hopper broke and some of us used soda bottles, pipe inventions to make it work and when you find them for sale that's what is mainly wrong with them But there is a company that makes a new glass hopper for them, not too expensive either. DramWorx, great company and stand up guy.

As mentioned everyone has what works for them or brand loyalty.

-Rock[/QUOTE

I just found out that with very thin powders, i.e; Enforcer, which is almost as fine as talcum powder, that particular hopper makes an absolute mess. There are three vents to adjust the flow in the lower receptacle, these vents are adjustable but although their slots are very fine and don't allow most rifle powders to fall through, Enforcer which I reloaded this morning for the first time was an eye opener. A real mess. This is probably why the Duo Measure has been discontinued. I bought it in 1981 and always appreciated having it in addition to more modern equipment. I'm now looking for something that does not have side vents and if I can't find it, I'll buy something else.

ps: One way to fix the problem is to adjust the secondary vents to a mid range and tape the outside so that they do not allow any powder granules to seep through. I'll try DramWorx which you mention. I realize this thread is ancient but the reason why I am reading it is because of the problem I encountered.
 

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Uniflow v. Duo Measure

The Duo-Measure seemed like a good idea at the time. I found it to be a workable measure. One the down side it would shed small part easily. The Uniflow has remained the same for many years. I suspect that many Uniflow haters have never used one. The Ohaus based Duo-Measure has not been made in many years. It may be time to update.
 

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I made a replacement for my duo-measure from clear polycarbonate tubing and an aluminum adapter ring. Works great. Most powder measures use a standard size polycarbonate tubing. Others must be brought up to size with an adapter.
 

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Keep 'em both, especially as it was given you by a neighbor - he's made you gifts and might feel offended if you sell it and don't pass the price back to him! If you get into loading much you'll have reason for both.

Sounds like the powder may be okay. Shake the containers well to insure it's well mixed, then pour a few tablespoons out onto a sheet of white paper. Examine the kernels to see if they appear indenticle, if you find balls mixed with flakes or tubes, etc, toss it. If it's the same, and in the original containers, use it.

The DuoMeasures sorta priced themselves out of the market in the 70s, IIRC, the other types were less costly to make. As far as can you use the same stand for both, you have it all, why not try it?



Id have to know the neighbor regarding using an open can of powder.



If you know his techniques you should know if hes safe or not.
 
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