Shooters Forum banner

1 - 18 of 18 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
145 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I've been reloading for a little over a year now and have been using a lee perfect powder measure with little to no trouble. I always wondered if a more exspensive measure would be more accurate so I had been keeping my eyes open for a good deal on a used one rather than buying a new one and risking it being no better than the lee. I use all stick powders and the lee is usually +/- .1 grain on the shorter powders but never more than +/-.2 grain even on the longer sticks. I picked up a very lightly used rcbs uniflo for a good price and I really don't like it, but I'm trying to. It cuts powder like crazy. I disassembled it and inspected it, wiped it out good and it cuts powder about 50% of the time. All parts looked great, no wear or burrs. Am I doing something wrong or is this typical of this measure? If this is how they work I will just use the lee and get rid of the rcbs, I can't see how this could be considered acceptable. Honestly, I would feel a bit guilty selling it to someone though. I have ran Varget, H4831SC, IMR4831, and RL15 through it and all are about the same. It cuts grains 5 or 6 times out of ten and it takes considerable force to cut them, it really shakes the shelf I have it mounted to. Any Ideas? Thanks
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
145 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
Too much if this is as good as they work.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
13,444 Posts
Brad,

That's normal. Both my Uniflow and Redding 30 BR do that. Where the Uniflow will be superior to the Perfect is with spherical propellants, and sometimes with flakes.

The Perfect has a patented wiper that avoids grain cutting. It isn't actually perfect, but your's may work better than the two I have? Of those two, one cuts grains about half the time, while the other does it more like one in ten. So the manufacturing process apparently isn't perfect at forming that wiper, but it does better with stick powder than any metal drum measure will do. With fine sphericals it can sometimes leak and jam up the plastic drum, where the metal drum measures don't.

Some of the flakes have a hard time with the small baffle in the Perfect and will do better in the Uniflow. For example, I can meter Unique in my Uniflow, but not in the Perfect (the instructions for which warn specifically not to use it with Unique). The Uniflow doesn't do a fabulous job with Unique (I don't know any measure that does), occasionally getting grain jamming and cutting even with that powder, but at least you can measure it out.

The best measure for stick powders is the JDS Quick Measure, which is designed to absolutely never cut grains at all. Rocky Raab put me onto it. It is a little more work to set up than most measures, but works as advertised, and can be adapted to Dillon progressive loaders if you are into volume rifle loading?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
858 Posts
I have both and find that the Lee is best if you are using extruded powder. If you are using ball or flake powder it is pretty much a toss up.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
145 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
Ok, Thanks.

I don't use any ball or flake powders but I think I'll keep the uniflow around in case I do some day. I don't do alot of volume so the equipment I have is plenty adequate, I don't do any pistol ammo. Ya, the lee is far from perfect and isn't much to look at but they seem to be well worth the 20$ they cost, and I believe I did get one of the better ones.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
657 Posts
I used a Uniflow for years. About three years back, I bought a Lee Perfect measure. Tested it against the Uniflow with stick, ball, and flake powders. The Lee was slightly more consistent with flake and ball, but considerably more consistent with stick powders. The Uniflow is now retired.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
263 Posts
In my limited experience: For stick powders Lee perfect, ball powders RCBS, for flake powders Lyman 55.

Keep a spare lee in stock. They do get loose after a few thousand rounds. Has anyone ever suggested to Lee selling them in a 3 pack or even a six pack.

As a single all around measure the Lyman comes closest for me. I have never tried any of the high end measures or the redding.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,740 Posts
I've used a Uniflow for over 45 years with stick, ball, and flake powders. In fact, other than my Star measure which came mounted on the tool, the Uniflow is the only powder measure I have. What everyone says about the Uniflow and stick powder is true. My way around it is to throw a slightly lighter charge onto an electronic scale, then finish off the charge with a powder trickler. If I were to buy another measure, I'd like to try one of the electronic ones e.g. RCBS, Lyman, or Pact but that Uniflow just keeps on working. Just my dos centavos, YMMV.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
291 Posts
I see a general consensus from the previous posters and agree with them concerning the performance of powder measures with various powders. I currently have four powder measures on hand now.

Lee Auto Disk Powder Measure
Lee Perfect Powder Measure
RCBS Quick Change-Very close to the Uniflow Powder Measure
Redding Model 3 Powder Measure

I load as many pistol cartridges as rifle and like H110 powder. Both of my Lee measures do not operate well with H110. The Auto Disk gives consistent enough charges but it leaks H110 as you use it. The Perfect Powder measure will leak H110 and operates with a rough movement when using that particular powder.
I then went with the RCBS Quick Change Measure and it operates with H110 like a dream. Very consistent and no leakage.
A friend of mine gave me a used Redding Model 3 Measure and it also operates just fine with H110.
At this time I am well covered for powder measures and use them all with the various powders I load with.
Keep that Uniflow Measure in case you move into pistol loading with H110 someday. If your Lee Perfect Powder Measure operates with H110 as mine does you will want the Uniflow Measure.:)
Cary
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
25 Posts
On the subject of a Uniflow. I got one a few years ago in a bunch of stuff I got at an auction and have using it but am needing the lid for it. Anyone know where I can get a lid?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
291 Posts
If you contact RCBS they should be able to help you with one. They have great customer service. My father-in law gave me an RCBS scale that needed some repair several years ago. I contacted RCBS and they repaired it free of charge no questions asked.
Cary
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,580 Posts
I do not have a lee, I have 3 different Herters, 2 Lyman with hammers, the ole and new one, I have two Ohaus with very fine adjustments, one B&N, three presses that used the Uniflow plus Uniflows that do not have a home and the Little Dandy, and uniflow adapter for the Dillion 550, I do not allow a powder measure get the best of me, and one more is not the answer, and 2 old Redding powder measures and 5 Dillons mounted on tool heads with dies.

An expensive commitment, the Little Dandy, today, complete cost $300.00 plus, when loading pistols I will take the time to set up the correct rotor.

F. Guffey
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
13,444 Posts
They are supposed to cut powders. All of the name brands do. Read the ads for them.......
Cutting jostles the measure and causes the powder in the hopper to settle, so the next charge thrown is usually off on the high side. The Lee Perfect instructions boast of the patented wiper specifically to reduce cutting (read the first paragraph of page 2). The Quick Measure I mentioned is guaranteed not to cut grains at all and is the single most accurate stick powder measure I've owned because it avoids the jostling altogether. Mine is usually close to 0.1 grains maximum deviation and never off by more than 0.2 grains, even with very coarse stick powders.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,740 Posts
Cutting jostles the measure and causes the powder in the hopper to settle, so the next charge thrown is usually off on the high side. . .
IME, cutting compresses the powder right in the area of the drum cavity resulting in the next charge being off "on the high side" as nick put it. With e.g. Unique, continued cutting of the flakes can result in charge variations as much as .3 gr. or more. Not very comforting when you're working near max loads.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
742 Posts
The Uniflow and some of the other "high end" dispensers are advertized as to being able to cut powder for acurate dispenses. These arguments against cutting are just excuses for limp wristed motion. If you use a "strong" motion the "jostling" is prevented.

Besides, if you're using max loads you should be weighing the charges anyway. There is no excuse to not do that.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
13,444 Posts
It's not a point worth debating. It's just a matter of fact. It's either so or it isn't. Just take a Uniflow or other steel drum measure and weigh 30 drops (a statistician's minimum for reasonably symmetrical bell curve distribution) of IMR 4064. Subtract the highest weight from the lowest. What's the extreme spread you get?

I get 0.2 grains without cutting using the Quick Measure. If someone can do better in a Uniflow or other steel drum measure, that would be instructive to hear about as would their dispensing technique.
 
1 - 18 of 18 Posts
Top