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Discussion Starter #1
Gentlemen,
I just purchased a used Ruger Blackhawk which I would
like to have re-blued. I have heard that you may get
better results if you remove the old blueing yourself
rather than have the "smith" do that for you.
Any suggestions or comments would be appreciated.
 

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Have you though about just sending it back to Ruger for rebluing.  It would be a "factory" finish and their price is more than reasonable.  In fact, I would not be a bit surprised to see them do it for no charge if you call them first and do some "brown nosing."  About two years ago they put a new barrel on a Ruger No. 1 that I had shot out over the last 20+ years.  I kept expecting a billing invoice to arrive when the rifle showed up one day, complete with new barrel and an invoice marked NO CHARGE.  Just a thought.  
 

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John
What kind of shape is your revolver in? Also, is it a Blackhawk or Super Blackhawk? Some of the Blackhawks have aluminum grip frames and most Ruger single actions have aluminum ejector rod housings. These cannot be blued. The best finish I have found for them is one of the bake-on enamels. As for the steel, the appearance of the finished gun is determined by the surface prep. In most cases, blueing does not hide flaws it accentuates them. I would not recommend removing the old blueing yourself unless you have experience. I'ts very easy to wash out a screw hole or round an edge if you're not careful. The key to making a firearm look good is even surface prep. For instance, if you polish the barrel with 400 grit wet-dry then the rest of the parts should be treated accordingly. Remember there is a difference between a reblued gun and a restored gun.
                                      Hope this helps
                                             Dave
 

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I would advise against doing part of anything yourself.  If someone is capable of doing a good rebluing/refinishing job, they don't want to have to clean up any mess ups first, or have to do further work to get the surface to their desired state.
As a point of reference, I once sent a Blackhawk to Ruger to have a Super Blackhawk frame fitted, and they completly refinished the whole gun very nicely fo no extra charge.  I sent them another Blackhawk for refinishing and it came back looking very nice.  In fact, both guns looked better than new.  And, Ruger can refinish the aluminum parts, too.  I would be very careful who you get to do rebluing/refinishing for you.  I have seen some very poor jobs done by people that others had recommended.  Best to get references and call them.  The good people don't mind this at all; they are proud of their work.  I used to have a gunshop, and I would trust Ruger, Marlin, Winchester (USRA), Browning, and Remington to do just about whatever they agree to.  For some reason, a lot of people seem reluctant to contact the manufacturers, but I always found them very helpful, more knowlegeable about the subject than ANYONE ELSE, and very easy to deal with.  I mean they have people whose job is customer relations.
 

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Virginian,

I agree with you about the manufacturers. I almost think they are glad to get some of their guns back to check them out anyway. Liability wise that is.


Regards


:cool:
 

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I'll second those comments about manufacturers being excellent service resources!   I've never sent a gun to a manufacturer that it wasn't repaired properly, and if sent for refinishing that it wasn't better than their new guns!   Those folks do take pride in their work, and they do it all day, every day, with their own guns, so they know how to get the job done... right, the first time!

Give the manufacturer the first shot!   They are usually overly generous as well!

God Bless,

Marshall
 

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I'm having my Blackhawk refinished by a local smith for three reasons:

1. The price he quoted me was equal to what Ruger charged plus shipping expenses (remember, that's where most of the cost will be).
2. I don't have to worry about how many hands my sixgun will pass through both ways (I take it to the smith & pick it up when done.)
3. I've seen his work, and I like it better than the typical Ruger reblue.

If you have a competent gunsmith in your area, go see some of his/her work. A good smith will be eager to show you or refer you to a satisfied customer. If you like what you see, go for it. Besides, it keeps the local businesses open.

Just my thoughts...
 

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Yes, I agree with you Seeker in principle. Unfortunately, in many areas, a good smith is getting harder to come by. After the forced thinning by the last administration of FFL Holders, I've seen many good smiths say the heck with it and go out of business.

This leads us back to the manufacturers and big outfits.

Then as you say, shipping restrictions and charges come into play.

Regards,

:cool:
 
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