Shooters Forum banner

1 - 9 of 9 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
268 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Hello from Scotland

At present my on going project is to re-oil and finish the stock on my Theoben Rapid 200 precharged air rifle. At £650 it wasnt cheap and not even custom ! At present the stock is back to bare wood and has been reshaped (very comfy now) i have sanded it with various grades of paper and it smoother than when new, i have done this in the past with another walnut stock with excellant results. But my methodology was some what hap-hazard.

Once smooth as i required i simply wiped over with white spirt (to remove dust) when dry i simply applied a small amount of "cold" boiled linseed oil rubbing it into the wood with my fingers and thumb.

I left it to dry for a few days and repeated the process about five times over a month, as i have already said the results were excellant,yet trial and error was the method, probably with i a bit of luck thrown in !

Can any one point out how i may improve my method or any extra steps i should take and improve this still further ?

regards Englander
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
628 Posts
Englander,

There's an article in the March issue of "Rifle" magazine that covers ten steps to a hand rubbed oil finish on your stock.  See "Refurbishing Classic Rifles" by Sam Fadala.

Lobo in NM
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
268 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
El Lobo

Thank's for trying to help, except i can not get Rifle Magazine, in Scotland , GUNS & AMMO is about the only U.S shooting magazine we get. And im impatient to get this gun up and running again.

My last attempt at Re-oiling with plain boiled linseed oil did produce an excellant finish on the stock,i did feel how ever that pure boiled linseed oil is rather thick and therefore takes a long time to penetrate the wood and even longer to dry and allow recoating.
I have been considering thinning the boiled linseed with whitespirt to allow it to penetrate deeper,quicker and dry fasrer as the spirt will evaporate ! After several "thinned coats" then perhaps back to puire boiled linseed? Well if it works i will let you know,this time im glad i have been taking photos "before & after"

Regards ENGLANDER
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
628 Posts
Englander,

If you'll post your email address, I'll digitalize the article and email it to you.  It might take four or five email posts, but I have the "toys'' available to me through the school where I teach.  These would be jpeg files and you should be able to open them.

Don 'Lobo' Lohr
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
108 Posts
I have used boiled linseed oil, too. I thinned it with mineral spirits made by Grumbacker, designed to thin oil paints for artists. Smells like lemon. I' sure you have an equivalent available.
Use no more than enough to wet your fingers and rub it in, and let it dry. You should not get the feeling it's on the surface, but soaked into the wood. Many people use way too much.
The old muzzle loaders recipie was to apply every hour for a day, every day for a week every week for a month and monthly for a year.  Never had the patience.
Prepared oil finishes have driers in them, which makes the process go faster. If you get too much on, wipe it off with spirits, or let it dry and use 0000 steel wool.
I cannot over emphasize, only enough to get your fingers wet.
Another thing you can do is sand it wet with oil, using the dust as a filler -- works well on walnut and cherry, probably is not necessary on maple.
Have fun. <!--emo&:)--><img src="http://beartoothbullets.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/smile.gif" border="0" valign="absmiddle" alt=':)'><!--endemo-->
Dan
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
268 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
Thanks El Lobo, humpty i learnt from my first attempt about very small amounts of oil, slowly, slowly you cant hurry or rush this can you! But the results are well worth all the effort and time.

Regards ENGLANDER
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,645 Posts
Englander

I think you are using the correct method for BLO (boiled linseed oil).
If your library can request books like our system does ask for Gunstock Finishing and Care by Donald Newwell - 1949. This is a classic work on stock finishing.

Also go to Parallax.com this is a Mauser rifle site with considerable discussion on stock stains and finnishing tips.

Thats a pretty expensive air rifle, I noticed on your clubs web site that they have dedicated air rifle ranges. Do you have air rifle silhouette there?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
268 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
Hello William

Thanks for the web page i will have a look.
Airguns are very popular in Britain,there are No restictions on then IF they do not exceed 12ft/lbs at the muzzle, doesnt sound much but they will kill Rabbits at 40-50 yards no problem. Britain has a booming and inventive airgun industry with many of the best costing over £1000 !
I recent years the pre-charged rifle has really taken off.They are extremely accurate, almost silent and can be safely used in and around buildings. Nothing better than skulking around the farm yard, knocking over crows, magpies, pigeon, rabbit,  rats, squirrels.
Have a look at www.theoben.co.uk they are excellant.
I only "hunt" with air rifles ( cheap dinner) but there are big "field target" clubs where they shoot silhouette and other targets.
My best days hunting with an air rifle was 56 Rabbit taken from a hide in about 4 hours ! good thing i like eating Rabbit, all were head shot at 5-55 yards with a German HW77 under lever in .177.
Often more Rabbit can be culled with an air rifle than a .22 LR  due to lack of noise also sky line shots can be taken safely.

Regards ENGLANDER
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,645 Posts
Englander

I'm messing up your thread by replying here but I am interested in the air gun hunting.

My wife and I have experimented with the .22 Hornet and the "Convert A Pell". this is a primer driven .22 caliber pellet. the cases have drilled flash holes to provide enough gas to push the pellet. This is quiet and accurate to about 75 feet.

Join the Cast bullet List on Yahoo groups and look in the archives. They have some stuff on quiet loads for many cartridges. I think some of the work was done by Frank Kelly. He writes on the Sixgunner board.

The folks in the urban areas like Phoenix and Tucson Ariz. are having problems with coyotes and domestic dogs. The large bullet quite loads have become quite popular.

Around domestic livestock we are loooking for quiet loads to take out raccons etc. which prey on the young. We have used the .22 Magnum a lot. We are looking at the .17 Rimfire.

Precharged rimfires look pretty good from a noise standpoint. We have so many health problems in our rabbits that we dont eat them. The Hawks, Ravens and Buzzards are grateful for that!
 
1 - 9 of 9 Posts
Top