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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Is it OK to push jacketed bullets thru a lee resizer die?
I have heard from one that it s jut to be used for cast bullets.
Seems that if your press is tough enough and the bullet is properly lubed it would pass thru given it was not an extreme difference in size?
Any on hand experiance?
Ron
 

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I've done .338 to .329, for the 8x56R. Jacket springback is a worry, but didn't seem to happen to mine, at least when sizing that amount. Lube the bullets well before running them thru the die.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
jacketed bullets.

Thank you Charlie,
I was worried about trying to use a jacketed bullet thru it.
I have another worry about trying to open up one from .329 ( Lees nearest off the shelf size to .358.
I dont know if it is do able.
I gues I could get most of it with the lathe then polish it?
I understand that there is only about a .100(long) of it that actually rizes the bullet?
I measure spring back with the micrometers after sizing?
Ron
 

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I don't bother with my lathe, just use the mandrel as I described in the .351/.401 thread. The section that does the sizing is fairly narrow, and laps out easily.
Jacket springback would be tough to measure, and it is why you are sorta limited to jusy how much you can size down, depending on bullet construction. The lead core sizes down, and stays that size. The bulet jacket can spring back a small amount after sizing, and actually seperate from the core. Affects balance, accuracy, terminal proformance, and all sorts of things. I haven't had a problem using the Hornady 200 grain .338 SP sized to .329. I've heard of others having some problems with some other jacketed bullets and sizing down a greater amount.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks charlie

I just about have it ironed out , collecting the stuff to do it.
Tried of being robbed by the Collector Ammo Association.
I cant imagine what they want to look at antique ammo for?
Could you advise on a Shell holder for a 401SL?
I have one for the 351 and the 7.62X39 but would like to have a "real" one for the "real Brass".
Cant find the number anywhere, RCBS/Huntingtons says you order by 401sl and they are expensive. So I guess the Collectors ***'s are running that show too.

Ron
 

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The .401 is one I don't have (but want, of course!) CH4D says to use their shellholder number 1, same as the .30/06 family of cartridges. Seems odd, but I've always had good service from their products.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Redding number lists it as thier #2.
Some data I found lists it as the 22-250 .243 etc. type shells but I cany confirm it,
RCBS said only "Order as per caliber" and they are expensive.
SO I will find another brand.
Ron
 

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The different brands of shell holders don't use the same numbering system. There are some that have no cross. This chart shows the equivalent numbers for the five major brands of shell holder. If in doubt, just call the manufacturers to check? Most have 800 numbers if you don't have unlimited phone service.

Lee Custom Services will make you any sizer size you want for $29. They hone them so you get guaranteed roundness.

Do not try to bore a Lee sizer on a lathe because the steel is hardened. You need a toolpost grinder with internal extension for that. If you know how to lap round without a hone, that is fine. Mostly you just have to realize that your hands will unconsciously apply biased lateral pressure, so you need to rotate the work during the process to spread that bias evenly around the clock. If your lathe has slow enough speed or a granny gear, you can turn the work in there while using an electric drill and split dowel with wet-dry paper and oil to open it up. Just be sure to clear the chuck of abrasive grit afterward. Flowing it off with your cutting lube pump is your best bet, as compressed air can send it into oil seals and other nooks and crannies.

A good trick I've learned that Veral Smith recommended is to buy some Dico stainless steel grade buffing compound. It comes the usual stick form, and both Harbor Freight and Ace Hardware stores had it cataloged the last time I looked. Smith points out that for putting a mirror finish on hardened carbon steel, it is perfect. I chuck the Lee die in the lathe at about 60 RPM and use a felt bob on a die grinder or a Dremel tool with that Dico compound to slick up the inside of the Lee sizer. Lead bullets come out looking like glass. You can also treat the steel with Sprinco Plate+ Silver or with Shooters Solutions Moly Fusion to permanently lube the surface to prevent sticking.

P.S. I just looked at RCBS's shell holders. They make a special one for the .401 Win. SL. Scroll about half way down the web page here and look under special shell holders.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Thanks Nick for the ideas,
The Shell chart does not list the 351sl or the 401 sl, and I did call Huntington's, that is when they just advised that to order by "caliber and be advised they are expensive", So no need to pursue that. Redding advises that the # 2 fits the 401? I have yet to check the hand load books comparative brass rim sizes to be 100% sure. But is if it then its just a matter of cross-referencing.
Lee did tell me that they would make a custom size die for 25.99 each plus shipping.
I guess its a matter of just doing it yourself when you have a lot of time and you enjoy it.
I have a large lathe , but also a small 4" craftsman that is perfect for this kind of work.
The size dies I need are .352 and .407-.08 so would have to be made by me or Lee.
I appreciate the lead on the polishing compound.
I will try it.
Thank you
Ron
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
The shell holder list for the 401 are redding and hornady are #1, rcbs is #3 lee and lyman are #2.
Same as the 22-25 243 and 30-06 family of brass.

So Huntingtons wanted me to "order by caliber , and they are expensive!"
I guess it would be hard to make one with out the number 3 on it?
These numbers are for the "real" 401 brass and not the formed by other brass cases.
Ron
 
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