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I have this old 8mm Mauser that shoots ok, but has a really hard mess in the groves. I have tried everything I can think of to get the stuff out. I can't seem to get it out. I have gone from hot soapy water to JB and everything in between.I'm not having any luck. Can anyone suggest a method to get this mess out, or should I just shoot it and hope for the best. Any help would be appreciated.
Dog
 

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The Hog Whisperer (Administrator)
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Steam. Try boiling some distilled water, pour through then scrub the heck out of it. A little "pocket" steamer with a tube rigged up may help also.

FYI, for really bad 8mm bores, I use a stainless .40 cal pistol brush. Good luck.
 

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Probably never maintained properly with corrosive ammunition usage. Seen many 8mm's this way in surplus military rifles. Some will slowly clean up by shooting and cleaning. Others never do but still seem accurate when shot. I've also done what MikeG suggests and it works some times. Each case is unique unto itself. Experiment and you may find a solution but if you don't then just shoot it. I have one Mosin Nagant that when shot has a nice bright shinny bore. Clean and leave in storage for some time and the bore will look rusty. Clean it before shooting and still looks rusty. Fire some rounds and its bright shinny again. Thats using non-corrosive ammunition. Suspect that sometime during its life it wasn't cleaned after usage with corrosive ammunition.
 

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Soak the bore with Kroil a couple of days in a row and then get the bronze brush after it.
 

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These folks have given good advice

Some military bores will clean up while others never will. So it depends. All the best...
Gil
 

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Finest polishing grade of steel wool you can find and a closely fitted jag.
 

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The suggestion to soak with Kroil is good, but I think you'll find plugging the bore with a stopper and filling it with something that is really capable of softening hard carbon will work best. I like Gunzilla for this. It is vegetable-based and not essentially non-toxic and in about 24 hours will turn the carbon to soft sludge or tar that brushes out very easily. It has the advantage that it also does a really excellent job of loosening rust so any trapped in the bore will brush out with it.

My second choice for this same job is Ed's Red. It sure costs a lot less, and since it is home made, is cheap to do. You can download a PDF file of the recipe from my file collection, here. Unlike penetrating oil, it has both polar and non-polar solvents, so it tends to get all forms of fouling except metal fouling. I would recommend plugging the bore and letting Ed's Red sit for several days to a week. You'll probably find the carbon all sitting in a sludge puddle on the stopper when you pull it.

The second thing that can clog a bore is metal fouling layers alternating with carbon layers. I suggest, after the carbon removing step, you want to squirt a little brake cleaner or Gun Scrubber down the bore to rid yourself of the cleaner from the first step (it's not a good idea to mix cleaners; Gun Scrubber is just solvent that evaporates off) and re-plug and fill the bore with a copper removing cleaner. I like Boretech Eliminator and their Cu++ products because the are very fast and essentially odorless, but they're not cheap. And if you are going to let it sit, any brand copper remover will work eventually. An Outer's Foul Out is good for this kind of work as long as no rust of any kind was present. They warn you that it can etch a barrel if it started with rust in it.

When you pull the stopper on the copper remover, you will see blue from the copper reaction if it was present. The only exception is with KG-12, which only turns tan.
 
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