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I cut off the end of the barrel on one of my rifles, leveled it, and recrowned it. I highly polished the end of the barrel, and the new crown. I'm looking for a good finish to apply to the end of the barrel, but the "easy" blueing products don't seem to be very durable, and many of the reviews seem to indicate that they often wear off, even when sitting in the safe, unfired.

I've checked out things like Perma Blue, Super Perma Blue, OXPHO-Blue, Formula 44-40, and while they're easy, I worry about their durability, since this will be protecting the end of the barrel, and the abuse sustained there from firing the rifle is likely to deteriorate whatever of the "easy" reblueing products I might put on there. Plus this is on a black rifle, and these reblueing products are blue rather than black. Color doesn't really matter much I guess, as I'm going to be threading the end of the barrel for a muzzle break. So, the end of the barrel, and crown won't be visible unless you're looking into the bore.

I've also looked into Express Blue, and while there are a few more steps to follow, it's still pretty easy to use, and it has the best series of reviews. But, I'm not sure it would protect the end the barrel/crown, versus being adequate for just reblueing the parts of a firearm that aren't subjected to high temperatures, carbon, pressures, etc...

Any alternarive suggestions for finishes that will protect the end of the barrel/crown? I do like "easy," but not sure which other "easy" types of finishes to consider, if there are any.
 

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The Shadow (Super Mod)
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Pretty sure the one I used was a Birchwood Casey product, used it on a "black" matte barrel. Was pretty close to a match, and has been incredibly durable.
If someone "reviewed" a product and claimed it magicallyy jumped off the barrel in a suicidal effort, while simply during in the safe; you can file those reviews under the bogus category.
Most of the time folks I've seen not happy with them, were sloppy with the cleaning aspect. Clean and degreased is critical, not a suggestion.

Cheers
 
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Any cold blue will last just fine until you sit the rifle muzzle down on a dirt pick-up floorboards....or you could leave the muzzle bright like Browning/FN did.
 
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I've used Birchwood Casey's products and Brownell's Oxpho blue. The latter was used on the end of a Ruger #1 that I damaged. I'm very happy with that repair. As Darkker said, preparation is the key to any success.
 

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I have used various "cold" blues over time. The best effect that I have found is to heat the muzzle until it is just too hot to hold. The blue works quicker and is darker per application. Only a couple of goes does a good job. I believe Perma Blue was best. (I think) old age here, :( it is the blue pasty stuff??
 

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Welcome to the Forum

Glad to see you here. There are many cold blue products on the market and most work at least for a temporary period and then may wear off. I have been using G96 brand cold blue for a number of years and it has worked well. As others have said, the preparation of the metal is important and results may vary. If the cold blue wears off, it is easy to reapply. All the best...
Gil
 

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Blueing

A trick I have had great luck with over the years is to blue small items with heat.
Small steel items like screws can be blued by simply holding the item in the flame of a butane torch
and removing the flame from the part periodically to check for color. When the part reaches a certain
level of heat it will naturally turn a beautiful dark blue or black. I then dunk the part in oil to quench
and set the color.
I have found this to work beautifully on small parts and all though I have never tried it, it might also
work on the end of a barrel muzzle.
I have never had much luck with cold blue products. I did restore the barrel of revolver once and sent it off to a guy that did small chemical hot blue jobs. I think he charged me $25.00 to do it. Do a little research and you might find someone locally who does that kind of work.
 

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Some cold blues leave some corrosion or rust

Some cold blues, unless they are applied exactly and then the residue polished off with steel wool or carded with a brush, will leave residue that turns into rust.

if you have a really sharp edge perfect muzzle crown, i would leave the end of the barrel in the white, and not risk some of the cold blue getting into the end of the muzzle and corroding the lands and grooves or the critical sharp edge of the crown. Browning and others do this.

A little oil or even paste wax will protect the bare metal barrel end from rush.

I know this is nitpicking to the extreme, but, in one case, I had to lop off about three inches of the end of a high quality steel barrel because dampness had rusted the lands and grooves near the barrel end, and destroyed accuracy.

Since the crown is a critical part of accuracy, you want it to remain as perfect and as polished as you can possibly get it, and any chemical that might unintentionally alter it should be avoided...my opinion.
 

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I've had good results with a product called BLUEWonder Gun Blue. They also have a gun black. It comes in a kit that includes a special cleaner, bluing agent, developer, and oil. It requires lightly heating the metal (only hot to the touch) for the process. I bought mine online from MidwayUSA, but you can probably find it on Amazon or local gun stores.
 

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A little heat really helps Oxpho-Blue and Plumb Brown work also, IME. Just enough heat so the wet swab barely sizzles when you touch it to the barrel. Then I scrub the area with steel wool and more "product" while it's cooling.

Cheers,
Rex
 

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Cold blue is what it is. Heat and a good surface preparation help. Polishing with a brown paper towel and then liberal applications of Kroil protect it. I like Brownell Oxypho-Blue best. And ditto on the heat and oil quench for small parts.
 
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