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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am about to install a recoil pad on a Remington Modle 700 BDL in .270 Win with a wood stock. I am just swamped with all the options out there and am curious as to what yall think. Is the grind to fit better as the quality of fit is up to the installer and his patience to get it as perfect as he cares to, or are the pre-fit ones out there so close that its not worth the trouble? Ive never put one on before, so am open to any info anyone wishes to share. Im so far thinking that a pad of 1" thick.

Thanks for reading and anything you may share that will help.

S_B
 

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The Troll Whisperer (Moderator)
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Haven't found a pre-fit that was actually what I would call a nice fit.

Grinding isn't all that tough for someone who will take the time necessary and pay attention to detail. You can purchase a pad vice to work the pad down off the stock, or you can shape it on the stock. MikeG suggests a wrap of muffler tape on the stock adjacent to the pad when grinding as this type of tape is more durable than masking tape.

Do an Archives search on this subject and you'll find lots of suggestions. Matter of fact, just scroll down to the bottom of this page to the "Similar Threads" and click on the two previous threads.
 

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[Haven't found a pre-fit that was actually what I would call a nice fit] - +2

FWIW, Two things for those who fit their own:

Get a pad long enough so that the stock's bottom line will stay straight all the way to the rear face of the pad AFTER fitting.

Apply TWO layers of masking tape to the stock adjacent to the pad, prior to grinding/fitting, so that any "oops" will only chuff the top layer of tape. (baby steps)

.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Alright, I kinda had a feeling that the pre-sized ones would be too rough to satisfy (yeah, im one of those picky-rifle crank-everything in its place-no bunged up screw heads kind of guys)

Thanks much for the "simular threads" suggestion, I didnt know bout it, but I did do a search for pad fitting threads and have read some over a few days back.

I also meant to ask, what tools do You all prefer? What type of sander/grinder and sand paper? A friend of mine recently bought a rifle with an aftermarket recoil pad on that some gorilla had installed, looked like he used a chainsaw file to sand it down! :confused: Who would do such a thing?

Good evening friends, S_B
 

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Tools
-Sand paper 200-600 grit 4-6 3"x8" sections of each
-Recoil pad fixture
-Vice large enough to hold the fore end of your gun
-padding for vise
-Bench top sander, rotary or belt (I prefer belt)
-Wide masking tape
-Sanding block

optional
-adjustable stand about the same hight as your table to rest the stock on while polishing pad.
-lemon oil, the kind you use to clean furniture

for pads without holes
-exacto knife
-Johnson's paste wax or dish soap (I prefer paste wax)

Grind to fit is the way to go, some recoil pads come with holes for the screw heads some do not (the ones without holes look better but are easier to mess up), if you pick one that does not have holes take a punch and push it up from the underside (this shows you where the hole is and makes cutting easier) and use an exacto knife to make a slit in the rubber to fit your screw (make the slit as small and straight as you can if done right the hole will close and be invisible) be sure to lubricate the hole with paste wax or dish soap to prevent tears, take wide masking tape and cover the bottom of your recoil pad with it (the part that contacts the stock), screw it into the stock and use your exacto knife to cut the tape on the pad around the stock be VERY careful not to mar the stock. Brownels sells a recoil pad fixture, BUY ONE it makes life 100 times easier for the next phase and I would not even attempt it without one, basically you use the fixture and a carpenters square to get the correct angles to grind at, you will have to get a different angle for the toe and heel, grind one and then reset for the other only grind the pad to the thickest point from either angle, remember that the piece of tape is the size of the stock and you have to polish up the recoil pad so don't quite touch the tape when you grind.


For grinding a bench top belt sander is general the best, rougher paper leaves more to clean up on the stock by hand, finer paper takes longer and gum's up/wears out faster. 80 grit leaves marks that are a serious pain to polish up to respectable levels I prefer to work with 180

For polishing the pad I take one pass with masking tape around the stock where it meets the recoil pad and then polish, remember to make your polish marks all in one direction generally on the same axis as the barrel of the gun , nothing screams amateur hour quite like polish marks going every witch way. this can be a lot easier if you refinish the stock at the same time, then you don't have to rap the stock with masking tape, just do the final fit and polish while you sand the stock(doing a refinish at the same time gives the best results by far). Also remember that sand paper is removing a little of the pad every time and you do not want to change the angle of the pad, a small amount of lemon oil applied to the pad can make polishing easier, if done perfectly you should not be able to feel where the stock ends and the pad begins.

I had 2 gunsmiths who had forgotten more about stock making than I know teaching me how to do it and I still had to do it 3 times before I was satisfied with the quality, now that was on a hand built custom rifle I was making for myself, but I would still advise against doing it for the first time on a gun with intact original finish worth more than $150, one second of inattention, one pound to much pressure and you can mar the finish. Also this is not something a gunsmith will generally charge you an arm and leg for, once you factor in the supplies needed to do it you might just save money, headaches and time taking it to a professional, $35-$75 dollars is the labor only rate listed in brownells and when you think about it with the recoil pad grinding fixture costing $65 dollars that's not bad at all. Then again finding a competent gunsmith is not always as easy as it should be.

Just a side note while you are changing out your pad you might make sure that the gun matches your length of pull exactly, until you have used a gun that is truly fitted for you you cannot appreciate the difference 1/4 of an inch can make. This also might take a lot of the mind boggling options in recoil pads of the table if you know you need one that is say exactly 1.25 thick.

As for products DO NOT get a limbsaver grind to fit JUST DON'T!!!! By far the easiest to tear and hardest to polish, defiantly not something to try your first time out of the gate. If you do have it professionally done and want to see a gunsmith cry by all means buy a limbsaver, personally I wouldn't have one on my gun, they seem to wear and breakdown in heat kind of like an old set of grips for a dirt bike, tacky and disgusting.

My personal favorite is packmyer, easy to work, easy to polish, good looking and soft on the shoulder.

Installing a recoil pad may seem easy, people who know how to do it and have done it regularly don't even really think about it while they are doing it, we just do and it works but the first time can be a real nightmare and you might not be so hard on the gorilla after you have tried one for yourself, I'm not defending him or saying you cannot do this project, but it is not as easy as it looks.

If I come across a bit hard I apologize that was not my intention.

That's the best advice I can give you. I'll add anything else as I think of it.
 

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You said it all in a nutshell tjrahl. My local gunsmith charges $35 for labor and I furnish the recoil pad. Its not worth my time or potential troubles for that amount. So far he's done six for me and a couple more are in the planning stages.
 

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To grind the pad to fit, I put a layer of masking tape around the stock, to tell me when I am down to the last .005".

I mount the belt sander in the vise.
I get my eye in the same plane as the belt.

I was doing that for a decade, but for the past couple years I have been leaving Limbsaver large pads un trimmed.
I have built 5 or 10 rifles that way.

The purpose of the recoil pad is to spread the energy out over area and time so that the maximum pressure on any point of skin never reaches the threshold of pain.

Grinding the pad reduces the area, and thus reduced effectiveness.



A good way to cover up the reveal is with an Eagle industries ammo pack rifle stock
 

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I've done that in a trial type setting but the down side is it catches on everything. Although some like hanging things on there rifles I just slip them into my pockets. Nothing to bump, catch or otherwise interfer with smooth shouldering of the firearm.
 

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The trouble from recoil pads hanging up depends on the application.
For shotguns, I would not think of it.

But for antelope, deer, and elk, all my shots have been prone with a bi-pod and between 329 and 625 yards.

With the full pad area, the 338 Win Mag shooting 250 gr bullets at 2600 fps with a 10 pound rifle - scope combination, has no recoil pain. No pain, even from the bench.
 

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I put a prefit limbsaver pad on my t3 Tikka . Other than to mike the pad and the stock, I would say the fit is indeed very good.You could first go to the web sit and get a template for the model that fits and compare it to your gun.
Since your gun is a Remington with what I think is a factory stock, you could also get one from the factory.
 

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Piece of Cake

I put 1 layer of masking tape around the butt overhanging about 1/4 inch . Then cut the tape even with the butt a sharp single edge or exacto works well , cut must be clean . attach new pad and draw around against the tape with a silver Sharpie . Remove pad and grind till the silver is just barely gone . I use a 12" disc starting with 100 Grit and finishing with 150 . DO NOT BUILD HEAT ! I prefer KICK-EEZ Pads . Pachmayers are okay and Limbsavers are junk . B-Square has a nice jig for grinding pads , available from Mid-Way or Brownells .
 

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The Hog Whisperer (Administrator)
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I like the bottom layer of tape to be the aluminum stuff. It's thin, and amazingly tough. Will stand a rub or two from the sander if you slip. Couple of layers of any other tape on top of that to let you know when you are getting close.

Some good tips here.
 

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You don't have to match the flare of the stock. On a couple of rifles for recoil-sensitive people I flared the pad considerably so that it fit the stock but still had a much larger surface area against the shoulder.
 

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You can flare with the B-Square jig , the tighter you screw the pad on the wider the rubber gets . I finish by rubbing Butchers Wax into the rubber , makes it nice and flat .
 

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I'm reading up on installing a grind to fit pad on my Remmy M700 mostly to lengthen the stock but also for the cush factor. This thread has offered several good tips. Just thought I'd suggest it be made a sticky.

...I know this thread is 3-years old
 

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Here are some additional thoughts.

1. What ever is on the butt of a factory gun I can almost guarantee that the wood on the butt is not sealed if the attachment is screwed on. I always sealed the butt with Acraglas Glass before attaching the recoil pad with the two screws. If you hunt in the rain and don't seal the butt it will swell.

2. Brownells sells long Allen Bits that fit their Magna-Tip handles. Buy two of the bits. Before you are ready to glue on the pad put the screws in the pad with the bits in the screw head. Leave them in until you have fasten the pad to the stock and the screws are tight. This saves from inserting and removing and re-inserting and removing the bits to get everything tight. This will save you from beating up the slot in the pad. Remember you have to put a screw head into the slit you cut in the pad so make it long enough. If it is too short you will tear up the pad inserting the screws. Use small headed screws. Brownells use to have a kit of screws that you could buy that had different sizes of screws used just for mounting recoil pads.

3. I never installed a pad with out re-finishing the stock. It is the only way to get a perfect fit and not mess up the finish on the stock. I found that a long belt sander with a platen was the best way to shape the pad and stock together. I also used a straight line pneumatic sander that is used in body shops. This straight line sander was also useful for sanding the forearm and keeping everything straight. Works great on sanding the pad with the grain of the stock.

4. Leather covered pads are the worse as you can't sand them. I like to make a template out of steel or aluminum and get the fit as good as I can making it fit the leather covered pad. Then I fasten the template to the butt stock and fit the stock to match the template. Remove the template and apply the pad. You can get a good fit this way but a lot of work.

5, If the rubber on a pad is a little proud to the plastic piece you can file the rubber using a fine tooth mill file that is sharp. A sharp mill file cuts the rubber surprising well.

Frank
 
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