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Discussion Starter #1
Howdy all,

After pondering the recoil problem I am having with Hornady Leverevolution rounds and several other handloads with large bullet weights, I came to the conclusion that perhaps a recoil reducer might solve the recoil problem for me. I already use a shoulder unit that straps on that is supposed to help with recoil, but with an existing neck problem it just isn't enough. And I do NOT want to get rid of my .45-70 rifles! I also shoot several military rifles but the shoulder pad also handles them well enough.

Other than a .243 that I use for hunting groundhogs and deer this past year, the balance of my rifles produce just a tad too much recoil as well but the shoulder pad seems to handle those AOK. But if I can find a good gunsmith to bore my butt stock and install a recoil reducer I can once again enjoy shooting them. At least that is my expectation! So if any of you have any experience with the various recoil reducing units I would appreciate your help with this problem.

Thanks,

longrangehunter
 

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They are reasonably heavy, so if you place one in the butt, make sure the balance of the firearm doesn't go out of whack. I've used a 13lb Ruger No1 in 577NE with 2 fitted and a 750gr at 2100fps ... and got a big long stout push! Nicer to shoot than a 10lb 45cal wildcat with a 500gr at 2230fps and no recoil reduction devices!!

Before going to the recoil reducer, I'd try the basic list of tricks ... a 1" LimbSaver and lengthen the stock a touch, add weight using lead shot in the butt and forearm so you can balance it, maybe even port if the noise isnt an issue. In all cases, the addition of weight is what slows recoil the most ... 2 reducers are about 1 lb in total weight, I'd add that in lead and see what happens before trying the reducers.
Cheers...
Con
 

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I have a 16.5" barreled Marlin 444, and that thing kicks like a mule off the bench. Shooting from off hand, sitting positions, etc, it is a joy to shoot. I bought the thickest anti-recoil shoulder pad that I could find for the bench work and that seemed to help a lot...............Have you considered reduced loads? A 300 grain bullet at 1850 is a real popular load around here for deer hunting, and I am sure it would do the trick for black bear and hogs as well. A buddy of mine shoots that load in his 45-70, and he loves it. If you need to move up to a load that is anymore powerful than that maybe a recoil reducer would be the ticket. Many years ago, a fella at my club installed a tube in the buttstock of his 375 H&H, and I think that he used a pin ball machine ball and a spring...anyway, made his own recoil reducer, and seemed to like the way it worked. Also, I have a Kevlar/Graphite composite stock on my Marlin, and even though it made the gun lighter, it did reduce the amount of felt recoil. Wood transfers recoil, and composites/foam absorb recoil.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Howdy Con,

I have to keep the weight to under 10 pounds. That is a must that can't be changed. I think I will try what flat top suggested and go to a lighter loading for most shooting. The factory Hornady Leverevolution will require the 1" Limbsaver at the least so I will give that a try first. I use a thinner Linsaver when I shoot my .308's and my sniper rifle can use a tad more weight since I never carry it in the field. I always drive out to where I hunt groundhogs and use the hood of my camo'd Bronco II for a "bench". All of my hunting rifles that I have to carry are well under 10 pounds though.

Thanks!

longrangehunter
 

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longrangehunter,
I once owned a Marlin 45/70 and felt that I needed to run it hot to be effective. How wrong I was! Drop off a few hundred feet per second and drop to a lighter projectile as suggested by Flat Top and it still remains effective. Off the bench is where most suffer from recoil ... using a sissy bag filled with lead is effective, as are the LimbSaver strap-on 'man-bras', using a lower chair to get your upper body more upright will also help off the bench.

Stock design on the Marlin is not conducive to absorbing recoil in my opinion, adding a raised cheek-piece might help, restocking with a laminate will add some weight ... which is to say there are numerous ways to get where you need to be.

My project for the next few months is to build a proper standing rest. I shoot a 458AccRel (500gr at 2230fps), am building a 458B&M (300gr at 2700fps from a 7lb rifle), looking at buying a 444Marlin and a H&R single shot 45/70, and a friend is building a 600 OverKill plus has another 458AccRel and 500AccRel. All can generate serious recoil, so the standing rest will come in handy. An easier more portable version may be to use 3 dowel rods and use them as 'shooting sticks' so you can shoot standing and still be supported.
Cheers...
Con
PS: Just to add ... recoil reducers now come in mercury (arguably the most effective), sintered metal and mechanical. To get the most advantage from them there are tricks to how they're set up in the stock. The mercury ones for example are best placed facing slightly 'up hill' in the stock, the mercury must sit at the rear when the rifle begins recoiling for their full 'slosh' effect, shouldn't make a difference for the mechanical types.
 

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Howdy all,

After pondering the recoil problem I am having with Hornady Leverevolution rounds and several other handloads with large bullet weights, I came to the conclusion that perhaps a recoil reducer might solve the recoil problem for me. I already use a shoulder unit that straps on that is supposed to help with recoil, but with an existing neck problem it just isn't enough. And I do NOT want to get rid of my .45-70 rifles! I also shoot several military rifles but the shoulder pad also handles them well enough.

Other than a .243 that I use for hunting groundhogs and deer this past year, the balance of my rifles produce just a tad too much recoil as well but the shoulder pad seems to handle those AOK. But if I can find a good gunsmith to bore my butt stock and install a recoil reducer I can once again enjoy shooting them. At least that is my expectation! So if any of you have any experience with the various recoil reducing units I would appreciate your help with this problem.

Thanks,

longrangehunter
I'm with staying off the bench if the recoil is nasty like Flat Top said, just keep the shooting from the standing or seated position. These big bores can shoot pretty decent groups but that doesnt mean they are for benchrest competition...they are purebred hunters (but you knew that). My only suggestion (other than added weight....that's no fun) is to practice with squibber (lite loads) and hunt with 300's. There is a great selection of bullet types in that weight.

I hope you can find a way to get along with the recoil.....it sure is a great cartridge isnt it?
 

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Lighter loading is the quickest, easiest, and probably best solution to recoil. Various buttshock-installed recoil reducers can help, and there are at least a couple of different types. But regardless of what mechanism they may use (hydraulic, spring-loaded, etc.) I have always suspected that the key ingredient to their effectiveness is added weight. Were I in your predicament, I believe I would look in to recoil reducers paying particular attention to what buttstock hole size and location each requires. After choosing the most likely one, but before buying it, I'd go ahead and bore the hole. But then, prior to spending the bucks on some device, I'd fill the hole with lead shot to add weight, and see if that would do the trick. It'd be easy to experiment and see how much lead you needed to add, and what effect on balance you could expect, and if it were less than a hole-full it would be easy to use something like hot glue to seal in place however much shot you needed.
 

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When I shoot my big bore levers off the bench (.444, 45-70, .450) checking for scope alignment/accuracy, etc., I simply use a rest such as a lead sled. I actually use one with no weight attached, making it easier to cart around. Simply the rest itself and it helps a good bit.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
recoil reducers

Cheers...
Con
PS: Just to add ... recoil reducers now come in mercury (arguably the most effective), sintered metal and mechanical. To get the most advantage from them there are tricks to how they're set up in the stock. The mercury ones for example are best placed facing slightly 'up hill' in the stock, the mercury must sit at the rear when the rifle begins recoiling for their full 'slosh' effect, shouldn't make a difference for the mechanical types.[/QUOTE]

Thanks to all who answered me with the great ideas. Of them all, I like the ones that said to lighten the load. I am not overjoyed at the idea of adding any more weight in any form, plus I dislike the idea of mercury and I have heard that they work the best. I ordered a bunch of cast lead bullets in 300 grain weight for practice and I will load them much lighter. I like the idea of pratice with "squib" loads and then using the hot stuff (if needed) for hunting. After looking at my reloading books ( after reading your ideas) I decided that white tailed deer and black bear don't need so much power anyway. So I am loading some 300 grain JHP's at a lower velocity and suspect that they will do the work just fine. And to Perferator, YES it is a great cartridge! Since I hunt in mostly heavy cover, Southwest VA, range will be short so I changed to a WGRS peep sight and ordered a new front sight as well, which will be set for 100 yards. Also bought the extra aperatures for theWGRS that have the brass rims to aid in picking up the target in low light. No extra weight and the recoil is much better! Thanks again.

longrangehunter
 

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Magna-Port has been around since 1970's and still offering affordable pricing. They cut 4 trapazoid shaped slots into the barrel near the muzzle. Yet bluing is not damaged at all. Result is elimination of muzzle jump and felt recoil. For example, my .308 rifle now shoots like a 22-250.

No increased noise factors like those ugly muzzle brakes. Visit their website. Nope, I don't get paid to endorse any business.

Price is about $140. plus shipping. It's worth it!!

www.magnaport.com

TR
 

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I just ordered the Pachmayr F990 from MidwayUsa.com it's supposed to be the most recoil absorbent pad available on the market. I'm still waiting for it to come in, gonna put it on my 1895 cause the stock pad is like a **** brick. Its Used by .50 cal shooters.

It costs $60 bucks from Midway plust shipping, it came out $75 bucks

It doesn't come pre-fit so your gonna have to do all the work yourself or unless you have a friend who's a gunsmith who can hook you up with a deal

http://www.pachmayr.com/F990.php
 
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