Shooters Forum banner

1 - 15 of 15 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
No apologies...but I'm a diehard archery guy...thing is..New York allows me to take another buck with a shotgun or muzzleloader and after shooting the 3" mag sabot slugs yesterday my shoulder is asking if it's really worth it ?? Also, accuracy is not the greatest with the slug gun as I'm told muzzleloaders can do.

Here's my question and a couple guns I am considering. Can you help me out with some advice as to the pros and cons of any of these guns? Maybe advice on powder and ammo that works best for you, etc.

http://www.cabelas.com/product/Traditions-Vortek-Muzzleloader-with-Scope/755658.uts?Ntk=AllProducts&searchPath=%2Fcatalog%2Fsearch%2F%3FN%3D%26Ntk%3DAllProducts%26Ntt%3Dmuzzleloader%26Ntx%3Dmode%252Bmatchall%26WTz_stype%3DSP%26form_state%3DsearchForm%26recordsPerPage%3D80%26search%3Dmuzzleloader&Ntt=muzzleloader


http://www.cabelas.com/catalog/product.jsp?productId=706583&type=product&WT.tsrc=CSE&WT.mc_id=nextag&WT.z_mc_id1=706583&RID=40&mr:referralID=262482ed-e839-11df-b21a-001b2166c2c0
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
21 Posts
Hi dartonman
I have a traditions pursuit pro break action muzzleloader, it's the most accurate gun I own. It is very well balanced at 8lbs. I shoot 250 gr. hornady sst bullets with low drag sabots. I use pyrodex rs and triple seven powder with great results. You won't be sorry with either one of these guns. The one advantage of the Vortex would be the easy removal of the breech plug. hope this helps.:D
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,962 Posts
I have nothing against Traditions Rifles but I think for less money you can get a CVA with a stainless steel barrel. The barrels are top quality. Or a T/C Impact for $249.00 again, less money better rifle. Now I like Traditions Rifles but would not get one of their inline rifles.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,683 Posts
Pros- cheap, but you get what you pay for

Cons- plastic, ugly inlines, not traditional at all
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
199 Posts
No apologies...but I'm a diehard archery guy...thing is..New York allows me to take another buck with a shotgun or muzzleloader and after shooting the 3" mag sabot slugs yesterday my shoulder is asking if it's really worth it ?? Also, accuracy is not the greatest with the slug gun as I'm told muzzleloaders can do.

Here's my question and a couple guns I am considering. Can you help me out with some advice as to the pros and cons of any of these guns? Maybe advice on powder and ammo that works best for you, etc.

http://www.cabelas.com/product/Traditions-Vortek-Muzzleloader-with-Scope/755658.uts?Ntk=AllProducts&searchPath=%2Fcatalog%2Fsearch%2F%3FN%3D%26Ntk%3DAllProducts%26Ntt%3Dmuzzleloader%26Ntx%3Dmode%252Bmatchall%26WTz_stype%3DSP%26form_state%3DsearchForm%26recordsPerPage%3D80%26search%3Dmuzzleloader&Ntt=muzzleloader


http://www.cabelas.com/catalog/product.jsp?productId=706583&type=product&WT.tsrc=CSE&WT.mc_id=nextag&WT.z_mc_id1=706583&RID=40&mr:referralID=262482ed-e839-11df-b21a-001b2166c2c0
Hey there Dartonman!

I'd go with the Traditions pursuit package in .50 caliber. Plus you get the stainless steel barrel with the Camo stock! + U GET A Scope! Buy it and don't look back!!!:D


PS.

However, I do agree with Cayugad, that TC makes better ML's all-round!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
521 Posts
My shotgun likes 1 oz slugs at 1,600 fps (Winchester). They kick a little bit!!!

If my memory is correct, 437 grains to the oz of lead. Therefore, a 400 grain ML bullet is about the same weight at about the same speed (same kick). You need a good butt-pad.

Also, a round-ball, to 50 yards will kill elk dead (I've heard it said that a RB is actually better on flesh than a bullet, and of course much worse when flying through the air). So, to 100, or maybe 125, it is plenty medicine for deer. And, at 180 grains, or so, it is much easier on the shoulder.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,249 Posts
I shoot both .50 & 54's at shoots & in the field. The .54 is better at both places. Use 60-80gr of 2F with a .535 ball tightly patched on the range (smoother/softer recoil) and the same ball with 120gr of 3F for deer, going to maxi's or conicals for larger game.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
143 Posts
Beginner ML Gun

I started with a Traditions Buckstalker .50 then when I became more involved I bought a TC Omega Z5 .50. The Traditions Buckstalker is about the easiest ML gun to begin with. It's a break open action, accurate, light, and most importantly simple for someone new to the sport. I'd also recommend Traditions Muzzleloader scope kit. The Buckstalker is around $170 and the scope kit is around $60 at Dick's Sporting Goods. Good Luck!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
931 Posts
Hey there Dartonman!

I'd go with the Traditions pursuit package in .50 caliber. Plus you get the stainless steel barrel with the Camo stock! + U GET A Scope! Buy it and don't look back!!!:D


PS.

However, I do agree with Cayugad, that TC makes better ML's all-round!
Check the specs. It says "Nickel", not Stainless. My old CVA Optima was not stainless steel, but had a nickel finish and it still rusted quite easily. The Traditions might be like that. I know the new CVA Optimas are truely stainless.

Also, if you can get just the rifle, I'd do that. The scopes they put in these packages are usually cheap things you could buy for $25-50, but I wouldn't use them on anything that kicks harder than a 22LR. Plan to buy the ML and then spend another $125 minimum on a decent scope.

My son put a bad shot on a decent buck, using the cheap BSA scope that came with the rifle. We got the deer, but he needed a second shot at close range. Later at the range, the gun would group tight for two to four shots, then the group would move three inches. The adjustment knobs also sometimes moved POI 1/4" per click, sometimes 1/2" per click. The rifle had shot great when it was new, but the scope developed these problems after about 50 shots or so.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,683 Posts
Pros- cheap, but you get what you pay for

Cons- plastic, ugly inlines, not traditional at all
Buy cheap plastic, get cheap plastic; get a real muzzle loader and learn to hunt or use an inline to just shoot whatever gets in your way-:rolleyes:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
52 Posts
inline vs traditional

Buy cheap plastic, get cheap plastic; get a real muzzle loader and learn to hunt or use an inline to just shoot whatever gets in your way-:rolleyes:

I've often considered buying a Lyman Great Plains Hunter (guess I'd consider that my next rifle if I ever get one) to replace my CVA Optima Pro.

However, I'm reminded every year of the benefits of the in-line, (albiet--not the true "traditional" muzzleloader id like)

I hunted in 7" of fresh powder this season, and had a considerable hike back to my stand, and on opening morning I fell 3 times getting to my stand in the dark. (OUCH) and I can tell you I appreciated the closed breach design and its ability to keep the snow out.

Call me clumsy, but I didnt have my snow shoes & the and frozen chissel-plowed corn stubble was kicking my #[email protected]#[email protected]#.

I'll still get my new Great Plains Hunter some day, but I'm going to enjoy the all-weather benefits of my inline until then.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
You will find some good deals from Cabelas and Sportsmans guide on BP packages now in CVAs,Traditions ,and TC .As far as the Trad pursuit package that was my first muzzie and it shot very accurate right out of the box Ive only shot it maybe 25-30 shots and scope is fine and it groups great, I dont think you could go wrong for a first Muzzle loader with it. But watch out soon will come 2 and 3 etc. for no other reason then they are fun shooting..
 
1 - 15 of 15 Posts
Top