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I am currently reloading with Hornady dies for my 300 win mag. I came into a set of Redding match grade dies with neck bushings. I am thinking of giving those a try with new Nosler brass. Do people full length size with new brass and then start neck sizing after the second firing of the brass?

I'm thinking full length size, trim if needed, load and fire. Then on subsequent reloads use the match dies and bushing to set neck tension.

Some advice/input here would be appreciated.

THanks
 

Elk Whisperer (Super Moderator)
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Worth a shot.

I don't have any experience with bushing dies but if I were "gifted" some I'd sure try them out.

Most brass 馃檮 just needs the necks made round again, but some may be "too big" so all my new brass gets ran through the FLR dies, checked for length, trimmed if needed *(1) then "fire formed" with the load I've already worked up in fired brass and have deemed accurate to minute of gopher.

Subsequent loads are neck sized only until the brass has grown and needs trimmed *(1) then the whole lot gets done.

*(1) Once brass has grown to need trimming it gets annealled, FLS and then trimmed. I've found that sizing first then annealling the brass gets dinged and you hafta size the neck again anyway.

Let us know how those bushing dies work.

RJ
 
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If the cases chamber, there is no need to FL size them. Just size enough neck to make it round and fire-form.
Your neck bushing should be .002 smaller than the diameter of a loaded neck. So, you'll need to neck size a fireformed case, and seat a bullet to get that accurate measurement.
The good news is there is no need for an expander plug.
It's best to use bushing dies on consistent lots of brass instead of assorted range brass due to variations in neck thicknesses.
 

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An alternate opinion .
Bushing dies work best with neck turned cases either just a skim turn or a full to chamber spec turn whichever is applicable . Some brass might size real nice in a bushing and other brass may be hard to size or even size crooked due to uneven neck wall thickness . So for the hunter reloader not a competition shooter I reckon it's easier to use a Lee collet die to neck size as it will handle cases with varying neck wall thickness better than a bushing . You can extend the bushings ability by having several size bushings but the collet die is easier as long as you find out how to use it properly which most don't .
Also full lenght sizing just upsets the case fit every time you reload unless you do it very percisely . I don't use FL dies anymore I use a body dies to size the body and do any shoulder bump that may become necessary at some point and the Lee collet does the neck sizing or a bushing neck die only , all seprate functions and much more easily controllable . That way you can only neck size when you reload and only body size when actually needed . cases last longer , stay softer and fit better .
Redding Body die 75153
Redding Comp Seater 55153 , you probably already have one .
dump the other Lee die .
Another possible problem that can occur sometimes with belted cases is a slight bulge just above the belt that hinders chambering . Some dies can't get right down to the belt .
So if you experience that then buy the collet die from Larry Willis . Innovative Technologies - Reloading Equipment
 

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Sizing technique has been argued and discussed since people started reloading them. Some say full length is best, others that partial sizing is best, some say neck sizing is best. I have known target shooters that never resize a case because the case fits the chamber and the spring back allows a minimal yet effective hold on the bullet.

What you need will depend on your gun, your use, your load and your whim. For me I have learned that my 03A3 in 3006 has a chamber that is very large in diameter but has a decent headspace. If I full length size those cases the case body ruptures after about 3 reloads If I just neck size for it the cases will last well over 20 reloads and I have never had to push a shoulder back on any of them. I have an AR that requires small base dies to provide reliable feeding so I use a small base die and use it bumping the shoulder each reload. The rest of my rifles are happy with partial sizing in a full length sizing die. I have to full length size for my pistols and crimp them while none of my rifles are crimped at all.
You will need to measure the case lengths before and after firing from base to shoulder to make an informed decision as to what you need to do for your loads in your gun for your application. Then stick to it until your needs change.
 

Elk Whisperer (Super Moderator)
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but the collet die is easier as long as you find out how to use it properly which most don't .
More than one way to skin a wallaby mate so don't arc up eh? 馃槈
 

Elk Whisperer (Super Moderator)
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I think we were talking about the same thing, just you were with the 'roos in the upper paddock and couldn't hear me.

RJ
 

The Shadow (Super Mod)
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Calm down Country.
You are looking for insults that don't exist, and seeking the worst in people.

Take a breath and find your center.
 
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I don鈥檛 care for Redding鈥檚 bushing dies. I have a set, and don鈥檛 care for the outcome, especially when changing brass brand or sometimes even lots within a brand. I like neck sizing, or rather I severely DISlike full-length sizing, so a Lee collet die plus a Redding body die is the ideal combo for me. If I have my choice, I鈥檒l then take a Forster seater, but I鈥檓 not unhappy with the seater from Lee most of the time.

Lee鈥檚 collet dies can be a bit rough and need some polishing sometimes. That鈥檚 irritating but for me, not as irritating as bushing dies.

YMMV
 

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I think the makers/sellers of bushing dies are doing a disservice by omission. They're making a tool that works perfectly IF you have other tools and some knowledge about your rifle most don't know first.
MZ5 is right--- Bushing dies are nothing but a PITA with irregular brass.

My process is to buy a BIG batch of brass for one gun and measure enough of those new cases to know what diameter the necks are. I have an indicating micrometer that makes it as fast as cleaning primer pockets...two seconds per case, max and accurate to ridiculously small (.00002). In the last 35 years, its rare to find cases more than +.002. I've never seen a small case in a lot.
WHAT is that diameter?
What is the outside diameter of the neck portion of the chamber?
We can extrapolate chamber dimensions by measuring a 'fired in that chamber' (fireformed) case.
What is the inside diameter of that fire-formed case? We don't have those tools, but it can be extrapolated by resizing the neck and seating a bullet and then measuring the OD again. OD of the neck, minus Bullet dia= double the neck thickness. Measure OD in three directions to detect out of concentric cases and by how much.

The goal is to resize the neck to ONLY .002 smaller than bullet diameter plus neck wall thickness.

Obviously you need a micrometer capable of 'tenths' (.0001") That's tenths of thousandth of an inch.
To develop the 'feel' and skill to quickly measure and read, measure bullets. Jacketed bullets from major makers are all within .0002 in diameter and copper is slightly 'gummy' in feel so the proper torque is quickly learned. (Some gunsmithing students thought they were just a fancy C clamp. "Hey teach, my bullets are .221 diameter!")

One example--
6mm Remington formed from W-W 257 Roberts brass (new in '88).
Fireformed neck OD is .2812.
Neck OD after re-sizing in RCBS die and a bullet seated is .2740.
Neck thickness is .2740 minus .2435 is .0305 or .0152 per side.
I want the hole to be .2415 to give proper neck tension (for my rifles) so the bushing for my (Wilson) neck bushing die in this particular case is .272.
No need to drag an expander through an under/over-sized neck ever again. :)

If you turn necks, the math gets easier, but true dimension of the chamber neck is needed by casting.
The spring-back of brass confuses the issue of really accurate measurements unless its just ignored. In realty, different brass has different spring-back properties. I like large lots of brass and scrap it when the barrel is gone. 250 rounds of brass for a custom-barreled varmint rifle will usually last the life of the rifle.
 
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I like and use nothing but Redding Dies anymore. I like the way they are made. When they cut the sizing dies it's done with a "step-reamer", to guarantee that the neck is concentric to the case body.
I bought a set of Lyman dies............once, for my Remington 700 in 6mm Remington caliber. After resizing, using those dies the case neck had 0.0060 R/O to the case body using a tenth dial indicator and "V" block. Sent that die set back to Remington for a refund of what I actually paid for 'em, and a note stating what I thought about their methodology, and received a check. Put that "refund" on a set of Redding dies and was happy ever after.
The indicator nib was set on the case necks O.D., the body checked just fine with almost "0" R/O.
 
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