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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a bunch of 5.56 and was wondering if I can use my 223 dies? Can't find any 5.56 dies. Also do I reload same as 2.23? Tyvm
 

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The same cartridge, only the guns (chambers) are slightly different.
 
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The Shadow (Moderator)
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You can't find 5.56 dies, because they are the same thing as 223.
Yes, you load them the same.

If you want some actual detail:
Read Post #35 in this sticky, by UncleNick. And I've got a thread where I called and spoke with all the domestic manufacturers, who specifically told me there is no spec'd difference in the brass.
 
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5.56x45 and 223 Remington cases are for all intents and purposes interchangeable. The difference between the 2 can be found in the chamber of the rifle, which if you follow proper reloading procedures, does not create any issues.

You can use 223 Rem data and dies with 5.56x45 cases. As you should always do with any different lot of cases, start at the start load and work up.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
You can't find 5.56 dies, because they are the same thing as 223.
Yes, you load them the same.

If you want some actual detail:
Read Post #35 in this sticky, by UncleNick. And I've got a thread where I called and spoke with all the domestic manufacturers, who specifically told me there is no spec'd difference in the brass.
Ty, that's why couldn't find anything.
 

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The Shadow (Moderator)
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Mine say 5.56 but shoots both ty
Both shoot both, and is shown in the pressure tested reference in Nick's post. 😉

If you spend a little time looking over various companies reamer specs, you'll quickly discover there isn't "A" single reamer for either chamber.


Cheers
 

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Elk Whisperer (Super Moderator)
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5 5 6 sounds more tactikool than .223 Remington. It's not.

I would never demoralize any of my .223 Remingtons by shooting 5 5 6 in them or calling them 5 5 6.

It's like calling a 351M a 5 7.

RJ
 
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If you develop a good load for your .223 cases and then find yourself some 5.56 cases to reload. Re-develop that load for the 5.56 cases. The 5.56 cases do (or DID when i used to do a lot of shooting) have a tendency to have thicker walls, hence slightly less capacity. Safety first.
 

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I have checked my cases several times and seen numerous reviews on difference in cases for 223 and 556 and the data shows that there is little difference in case capacity and the slight difference shows the military brass to have a slightly higher capacity than several commercial 223 brass.
 

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Yep. The military being thicker and heavier applies to 7.62 NATO vs. 308 W. I have 308 cases as light as 153 grains and a foreign 7.62 case that is 185 grains and am pretty sure I once had one that was 190 grains. A total brass weight difference of over 30 grains. If the heads all had identical dimensions and if the brass alloys were all the same, it would represent a difference of almost 4 grains of water capacity, though, in reality, none of those other things are all the same, so you actually have to measure case water capacity to see what you have. But for 30-06, the difference is more like 10 grains of brass. For 5.56 vs 223, the common commercial brass is often about 4 grains heavier than Lake City. I don't know what the newer Starline 5.56 brass with the harder heads has by way of capacity.
 
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5.56x45 and 223 Remington cases are for all intents and purposes interchangeable. The difference between the 2 can be found in the chamber of the rifle, which if you follow proper reloading procedures, does not create any issues.

You can use 223 Rem data and dies with 5.56x45 cases. As you should always do with any different lot of cases, start at the start load and work up.
Somehow it seem's this suggestion escapes a lot of people and I'm not sure why. Specifically "start at the start load and work up"! That has got to be one of the most basic rules of handloading!
 

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Short cuts are part of human nature, otherwise progressive reloaders, magic bore cleaners and keep off the grass signs wouldn't be so popular.
 
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Yep. You see lots of folks look at a load recipe range and just start in the middle. Mostly, you get away with that, so they assume it is universally fine. But you run into situations where it isn't and where, due to powder tolerance and formulation changes over time, the starting load turns out to be all the individual gun can tolerate. With the gradual universalizing of piezo transducer testing over the old copper crushers, I think you are seeing fewer of those in print, but it still isn't zero. But the powder companies also use those measurements defensively. On fellow with a Handi-Rifle in 243 Win on another board was getting halfway up through a Speer load and having it pop the action open, despite his carefully checking the latch for debris, plus it gave him a couple of hundred fps more than the data suggested he should be getting. He called Speer about it, and they just said "we have the pressure testing results on file, so we know it's safe". So, "start at the bottom and work up" still applies if you value your eyes and fingers. Your gun isn't the one they developed the load in.
 

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I stand corrected on my faulty memory. Very possible I mixed my memories of .308 with .223. That's what happens when I'm away from the sport for too long.

I have checked my cases several times and seen numerous reviews on difference in cases for 223 and 556 and the data shows that there is little difference in case capacity and the slight difference shows the military brass to have a slightly higher capacity than several commercial 223 brass.
Yep. The military being thicker and heavier applies to 7.62 NATO vs. 308 W. I have 308 cases as light as 153 grains and a foreign 7.62 case that is 185 grains and am pretty sure I once had one that was 190 grains. A total brass weight difference of over 30 grains. If the heads all had identical dimensions and if the brass alloys were all the same, it would represent a difference of almost 4 grains of water capacity, though, in reality, none of those other things are all the same, so you actually have to measure case water capacity to see what you have. But for 30-06, the difference is more like 10 grains of brass. For 5.56 vs 223, the common commercial brass is often about 4 grains heavier than Lake City. I don't know what the newer Starline 5.56 brass with the harder heads has by way of capacity.
 

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I have a bunch of 5.56 and was wondering if I can use my 223 dies? Can't find any 5.56 dies. Also do I reload same as 2.23? Tyvm
First what are you shooting these rounds out of? Second 5.56 dies you can get from RCBS. If you are putting these through an AR then some ARs require you to use the 5.56 dies even if you are shooting .223. Reason being that the ARs are requiring the .223 bras to be squeezed to tighter tolerances. My Colt will not accept reliably .223 brass reloaded using .223 dies. But always accepts .223 brass from the RCBS 5.56 dies.
 

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The Shadow (Moderator)
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Those are called Small Base dies, because RCBS has some wide tolerances.
I had to buy RCBS SB dies for a rifle once(non AR), then I started buying Lee dies and that "need" went away.
 
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Elk Whisperer (Super Moderator)
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Yes, RCBS has had problems with oversized equipment going back many years. My Lee dies also work better and not because they are less expensive.

RJ
 

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Lee has said in the past they are the only die maker who hones their sizing dies to final dimensions. That not only tends to keep the size precise, it also tends to keep them perfectly circular in cross-section. Lee sizing dies would, therefore, be a bargain even at a higher price point. (Lee, if you are listening, please don't let that last sentence give you any ideas.)
 
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