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I love to hunt and shoot whenever I can. I own a browning a bolt in .270 cal. And recently purchased a Winchester 1885 high wall in 22-250. They both shoot great but I hear I can gain accuracy by loading my own ammo. I'm also interested in learning a out all the different combinations and recipes to get different results. How much is it to get started and is it worth it. I'm going to basspro shops this weekend are there starter kits and are they any good or should I stay away from those. Any advice would be appreciated.
 

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GCHNTR,

You can usually get better accuracy with handloads and you will get plenty of encouragement from the guys on this forum about learning the hobby of reloading. The starter kits from Lee or RCBS are great and really do contain almost everything you need to get up and running. As you learn different aspects of reloading, or how it applies to your needs, you may add and subtract a few things, but the basics are always the same. The best advice I can give you is to read through several of the threads at the bottom of this page, as just about everything has been covered in the last year or so.

If you want a simple and inexpensive way to decide if reloading is for you, buy the 49th edition of the Lyman reloading manual or the 9th edition of ABC's of Reloading. In either book, read the chapters that explain the basic reloading process and from there it should be clear to you if this hobby would be something you will enjoy. In a nutshell, if you are a detail-oriented person who enjoys the process of doing a job correctly, then you'll love it. If you're a little on the impatient side and just wants to go shoot or hunt, you'd probably get bored with reloading pretty quickly
 

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Buy several manuals. Read them cover to cover several times. Then go buy some equipment if you still want to load.

You will not be able to load ammo that is better in your gun than at least one of the factory loads unless you do it carefully, scientifically, and safely, and you won't load better ammo than the factories unless you test all your ammo carefully, scientifically, and safely. Keep records. Record keeping is a vital part of the scientific aspect of reloading and will teach you a lot as your records grow.

Get a chronograph.

Reloading is a science - shooting is an art. Unless you are truly interested in the science of internal, external, and terminal ballistics, your reloading will likely not produce superior ammunition. Because it takes so much shooting to do the testing and experimenting necessary to scientifically draw conclusions about the effectiveness of particular loads, reloading good ammo is not cheaper than buying factory made. You can make cheap ammo, but it will only be cheap, not good; so do not expect to save money.

If you work at it, it is very likely you will be able to make very good ammo that does exactly what you want in your guns. It's also fascinating.
 

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Get Lymans manual as recommended and Modern Reloading by Richard Lee especially if you end up using Lee Precision equipment and if you need a third book the ABCs would work. Go to Midway USA and Cabelas web sites and read owner reviews for any equipment you may want to buy. You will learn much from the owner reviews and it is easier to make decision if a kit or piece of equipment is worth buying. All the brands will work and a kit is a good way to start.
 

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Do it! If you can afford it, I would get the RCBS starter kit with the rockchucker. you'll never have to upgrade the press. There will be a few more tools you'll need, and as stated above, get several manuals. The Lee manual has the best written "instructions" that I have seen to date. There is a pretty high startup cost if you like quality equipment, but you'll be shooting so much more you will soon forget about the cost.
 

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Lee Challenger Breech Lock Single Stage Press Anniversary Kit is available from Midway at under $100!! Although you'll here many different opinions on name brands such as RCBS, Dillon, Lyman and others, I don't think they can ever beat Lee on pricing. I've been reloading for right at 30 years with a Lee brand without a problem. In my opinion, buy the Lee and have money left over for your reloading book, and components needed to get started. Good luck and feel free to re-visit this forum for advice.
 

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I would suggest you get your wife involved and convince her how much more accurate she could shoot if you reloaded the bullets yourself.

That or be married as long as me and not have to ask or explain anything about what you buy. We do not question each others spending. I'm just glad her toys are no where near as expsensive as mine.

You need to understand that reloading does not magicaly make your rifle more accurate. Many people starting out have a hard time just getting their reloads as accurate as the average factory load. There is a lot to learn and be willing to pay attention to detail.

I think we both agree though, Radio Control Helicopters is by far the most expensive, even more that the bass boats, hot rod motors, and shooting.
 

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Thank you all for the support and insight. I really appreciate it. Now I just have to sell my wife.
Fixed!!

Seriously, if you enjoy shooting, reloading can spur your desire to shoot more. You will be coming home from the range wanting to go back again to improve your shooting technique or load up a load that you just selected as your next hunting load.
 

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One other hint: when you do start to reload keep notes so you will be able to remember works and what doesn't. It's pretty disheartening to fire off some really tight groups and then realize that you can't remember what load it was.
 

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Good points here. I have a question to add as I have been looking to get started in rifle loading for quite a while. Although, I'm not doing it for accuracy but in the hopes that I will shoot more.

I started loading in college with a used Lee Progressive 1000. I later gave it to a friend and bought a Dillon Square Deal B, a progressive as well.

Being verse on progressives, I keep getting tempted to buy a progressive for rifle calibers too. I then talk myself out of it due to cost. I guess I really do not know how the process works when you use a single stage. Would you set the press up to de-prime/size, then run all your brass through that. Hand prime each case. Then, set up the powder measure and run all the cases under the powder measure for a charge. Then, change dies and run all the cases through to seat bullet...etc., etc.?

Hope this helps the original post too. I hope I didn't distract from the original post.
 
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