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3 cleanings???? I have seen fair pigs get 3 cleanings before going into the ring, but I have never had to do 3 cleanings on brass.

I am with Mecanik. I lube (very little applied using the RCBS pad and RCBS lube. A dab will do), size and deprime and wipe off the lube. I use the time wiping off the lube to inspect the case for defects, clean the primer pocket and take a light run of the inside-outside neck deburr tool. That is when I find the little guys that have given up the ghost.

I will vibrate/clean the cases with the spent primer in prior to lubing if they need it. They normally don't. I have not found that the tarnished layer on the outside of the brass creates any issues in the reloading process.
 

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They normally don't. I have not found that the tarnished layer on the outside of the brass creates any issues in the reloading process.
I noticed that too. After polishing brass in a vibrating tumbler for few years I finally gave it up. Now I'm more concerned about dirt and physical contaminants on the outside rather than the polished surface. And the wiping process does just as you said. It gives me a chance to "scrutinize" the brass and toss anything that doesn't appear to be usable.
 

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My first 50 years of reloading was done with no case cleaner but paper towels and I still haven't worn out a plain steel die. It's not rocket surgery.
 

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I clean all my brass after resizing. If you choose not to, I will be the first to say more power to you. I sold once fired brass in the late 70's into the late 80's and I ALWAYS had better luck at gunshows versus other vendors. I probably got and extra 2-3 cents per round for simply making it shiny. I know my Dad reloaded a ton without all the fancy cleaning gadgets that we have now...but I guarantee if they would have been available back then...he would have used them. :cool:
 

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Discussion Starter #185
While I'm still figuring out the steps or process I want to use, which is like what some use and is even in books, I wanted to make sure I didn't do something that would result in bad powder or primer. I think I got a way to do that. I've seen videos where people talk about even the oil on a persons skin can affect primers. They wash their hands or wear gloves before or during the priming process. While I'm not a shiny brass nut, I do want them to be reasonably clean to protect the dies and not be oily and ruin powder or primer. I also didn't want to add steps that aren't needed. I plan to get a tumbler at some point but already have a ultrasonic cleaner, quite large I might add. Tumblers have their advantages as do ultrasonic cleaners.

My Modern Reloading book started moving again. Should be here Saturday. Press ship date hasn't changed.

I found a channel on youtube that I decided I don't want to follow. I think I could do better even now. I just didn't like the way he thinks things through. If I were to guess, I'd suspect he would be one to blow up a gun or do something else silly. I've seen some pros do reloading, he isn't one of them even by a country mile, in my opinion anyway.
 

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The Hog Whisperer (Administrator)
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I've never had a primer misfire and I've handled plenty of them. Suppose it could depend on the body chemistry of the individual..... dunno.

Lots of stuff gets repeated as 'fact' when there may be no basis for it at all.
 

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+1 on what MikeG said. I used to touch every one of them as I put them into the priming arm on my RCBS press. I use my Lee Autoprime now, so the primer never gets touched. I pretty much have the same number of miss fires. Virtually none.
 

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Discussion Starter #188
I've mentioned I'm disabled. Due to my health issues, I apply baby oil to my skin a lot, along with a few other oily things. Otherwise, I dry out and it's downhill from there. One reason I was paying close attention, it may be a issue for me where it wouldn't be for others just because my situation is different than most. I've seen it said a few times that it doesn't take much oil to kill a primer. I don't know how much but I figure even a little will at least have some effect on it. I don't want a bad primer because as we all likely know, it will happen at the worst possible time. Usually does anyway.

I may have to take some precautions others may not but I still plan to make some really good ammo. It may take time to get there but I'll work on it until I do.
 

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Discussion Starter #190
True. I just want to minimize the risk as much as I can, within reason of course. I have a few things that I have to do different depending on my health issues, even cooking at times as to be done a little different than most. I just want to do it the right way. So far, I've found a few who seem to be really good at it that has helped me figure out the process. Of course, I found one that I'm not going to either. I really enjoyed watching the sdkweber channel and his videos. Knowledgeable, lots of experience and he explains things in detail for those who need the detail. Still, if one just takes the basics of his videos, they can get really good ammo. If one wants to try to shoot the same hole at 100 yards, get into the details. Odds are one can't accomplish that but one could try. Me, for most calibers, I just want really good. Pistol ammo for example doesn't require a lot of fuss. Rifle ammo for hunting, I'd like to be more accurate. I don't plan to squeeze a lot out of it but but do want enough to kill a deer at a reasonable distance.

I still think this will be fun tho. It should take some boredom out of things in the winter too. Heck, if I just reload during the winter, it will help me a lot. I just hope supplies get back to normal sometime soon.

While I'm at it, could some of you share links to sites you frequent? I've searched ebay and find very little there for guns. I find some tools but not much else. I know about Midway USA, Midsouth Shooters and Opticsplanet but that is about it. Oh, I also use ammoseek at times to but it doesn't list everything. I also use gun.deals at times too. There has to be more sites than that.
 

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I never handle primers and never have. Plenty of ways to prime that takes no handling. I WOULD advise against dropping a box in shag carpet! The motel maid claimed I blew up her vacuum cleaner! Those things are expensive!
The only gun site I haunt and buy from frequently is gunsinternational.com Most of the guns on the internet show up there. New loading gear and supplies come from MidwayUSA.
 

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Discussion Starter #192
I never handle primers and never have. Plenty of ways to prime that takes no handling. I WOULD advise against dropping a box in shag carpet! The motel maid claimed I blew up her vacuum cleaner! Those things are expensive!
The only gun site I haunt and buy from frequently is gunsinternational.com Most of the guns on the internet show up there. New loading gear and supplies come from MidwayUSA.
I've seen people with those handheld primers do that. It's something I'm giving thought to myself. They empty the primers into the tray straight out of the box, shake to get them all upright and then prime. They never touch the primers at all. I may not do that at first but I suspect I will pretty soon. That would solve some problems for sure.

I was looking for videos about brass and comparing brands. I don't think I have the right search terms just yet but did run up on one that was neat for its own reasons. I think she is from Norway, maybe??? I went to her channel and it seems she does quite a bit of travel and shooting. Her videos don't show much detail but it shows that about anyone can do some interesting things.


Now to go search for some brass brand comparison videos.
 

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There is NO WAY to accurately assess brass unless you have it in your hand. You'll get plenty of opinion, but there is no way to judge because it changes so often, even from the same maker. Right now, if I wanted to shoot and reload, I'd buy a thousand of whatever you can find....and ten thousand primers.

With all priming with tubes--Get a primer flipper, get em all face down then simply stab the top end of the tube on each primer. It'll pop into the tube and then fall out one by one with the priming arm. Several makes work about the same way. There is no reason to handle primers or powder.
 

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Discussion Starter #194
There is NO WAY to accurately assess brass unless you have it in your hand. You'll get plenty of opinion, but there is no way to judge because it changes so often, even from the same maker. Right now, if I wanted to shoot and reload, I'd buy a thousand of whatever you can find....and ten thousand primers.

With all priming with tubes--Get a primer flipper, get em all face down then simply stab the top end of the tube on each primer. It'll pop into the tube and then fall out one by one with the priming arm. Several makes work about the same way. There is no reason to handle primers or powder.
This reminds me of the hard drive brand debate. A lot of techy folks always swear by some brand as being the best. Some it is WD, some Seagate, some some other brand. Thing is, eventually they all have a bad batch. I'm not aware of a hard drive brand that has been around a while not having at least one bad batch of drives. I notice the same thing with brass. If I search by brand, there's always someone that has had problems with that brand, swears they are awful and should be avoided no matter what. Then there are others who have never had problems or just the exceptionally rare problem with the same brand. Another thing I've noticed, some like one brand for one caliber but some other brand for another caliber. Same goes for bullets too.

I guess using any brand name of brass will be about as good as others. One will likely run into a few bad ones during inspection that has something wrong with it, to thin or some ding or something, likely from shipping more than anything else, no matter what brand one buys. I watched one video where a guy bought a box of Hornady brass that was supposed to be the cream of the crop. While inspecting it, he found one that the mouth had a really bad squished in spot. I'm talking enough that I'd try to get it a bit more round before I'd even put it into a die. I seriously doubt that brass left Hornady that way. I suspect it was done in shipping somehow but it goes to show, no matter the brand, a bad one gets through.

I looked into buying brass that was collected from ranges. Who knows what brand one will get but in some cases, they are about the only ones available at the moment. Given the reduced price, even if 10% are bad out of the box, it could still result in a lot of savings plus there may even be a few that is in awesome condition.

While I was hoping for someone to say, I've used XX for years without a single problem, I'm not surprised to get the response Jack gave. It's one of those, 'it depends', type things. Given the availability of things right now, it just makes it worse.
 

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As JBelk said, brass seems to be an ever changing sea, and if you ask for opinions, you will get many, many answers. Also, as He pointed out, One brand of brass that seems to be great today could be terrible tomorrow. As of right now, I have been finding that for a reasonable price Starline brand is about the best. Many will say Lupua, Hornady or Nosler is (Which I think may be correct) but it's a lot more expensive. Anyway right now ANY brand brass is awful hard to come by................................. and so we wait................................
 

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Since 99% of my reloading today is 5.56 I've been using mostly Lake City military brass I scrounged from the ranges. It's very "consistent" in quality. But wouldn't call anything I've used over the years "bad" brass. Anything can fail after enough reloads and it's usually because someone is loading right at the top of the pressure limits. Moderate loads make the brass last longer. I remember loading two boxes of .38 spec with 148 Wad cutters over and over and over till I finally got nervous and threw them away. I was shooting twice a week at an indoor range doing informal competitive shooting in a gun club. 100 rounds total every session. I did that for about a year and a half so I must have loaded those same cases over a hundred times. 2.5 to 3 grains of bulls eye doesn't make a lot of pressure. In contrast I've seen many high pressure rifle loads fail in less than a half a dozen reloads .Some in just 3 or 4.
 

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Discussion Starter #197
Since you mentioned pressure and powder load. Let's say I want to duplicate a store bought ammo. I'm not wanting to make it go as fast as possible or anything, just duplicate. If I shoot say 5 rounds through a chronograph and get a average of 1200 FPS from store bought ammo. If I start my load at the minimum and work up until I measure 1200FPS, would it be fair to say that the pressure should be the same as store bought ammo? In other words, my reloads will not wear anything any faster than store bought ammo? The pressures should be OK as well?

I've also seen where some say you should start at the low number, increase in small increments until you reach what they call the "sill". I think I'm getting that right. From my understanding, that can vary from one rifle to another but it should be a safe load that is also accurate. Am I understanding that correctly? I've only seen that mentioned for rifle rounds so not worried about pistol fired rounds.

As I mentioned before, most things I want to reload just needs to go bang and throw lead out at least close to store bought stuff. Hunting rounds tho, I might try to squeak out a little more accuracy as long as it is safe of course. From what I've seen, sometimes having to much pressure can actually cause a round to be inaccurate.
 

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So, there is a lot to unpack in your last post.

Pressure and velocity are in fact linked. Maximum or peak pressure and velocity are not directly linked. Using the wrong powder in a round could possibly give you incredibly high pressure that can be dangerous to the firearm and yourself, but still give you a velocity below what the round can safely achieve. This would be the result if you used a powder that was too fast burning. Conversely, using a powder that is too slow can give you poor velocity even if you achieve full load density (can't put in any more powder). Maximum pressures in this situation are generally lower, but you never achieve what the round is capable of. There have been several discussions on here highlighting those principles.

When it comes to trying to duplicate factory loads, that can sometimes be difficult. Use your loading manuals and the latest data for the components you have. I have been loading for 30+ years, and still very rarely stray from published data.

And yes, you should always start 10% from the maximum load given or at the starting load. A good example of that I recently covered in a thread about StaBALL 6.5 in a 22-250. I got a pretty serious high pressure sign (I don't have any pressure trace equipment) as I was working up the powder charge about 2% at a time. I was still well below the maximum charge given by Hodgdon for that exact powder and bullet. The signs I had was a significant increase above the trend in velocity, very hard bolt opening and extraction, the head of the case was obviously burnished, and lastly the primer was significantly flatter than the previous load which was .7 gr less.
 

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The Hog Whisperer (Administrator)
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Yes, no, and maybe. You'd have to have some confidence that you were using powder with a similar burning rate. Even then there are a few things for which the reloader doesn't have access to the same powder - at least not yet.

But if it's an average .38 Special, or 9mm load, for example you ought to be able to get pretty close with off-the-shelf components.

Anyway, if you have the same bullet, going out the muzzle at the same speed (or close) then it could be said to "duplicate" factory ammo, as far as performance goes.
 

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Those factory boys have things well under control. They have professional ballistic techs working round the clock to make sure they stay at the top of their game. The pressures they generate are near the optimum and duplicating them with your home brew is difficult. With a chrony and time you can do it but it takes a concerted effort to do it consistently. I tip my hat to those people and just load mine a bit on the slower side.
 
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