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New here, first time here on-line. I have a replacement right shoulder and am somewhat recoil sensitive. I need to find out how much I can down load and still be able to take deer and wild pigs with the load. I have been a reloader for many years, but would like to get some advive on this. Before my shoulder was shattered I always worked with the higher loadings. I will be shooting 117 gr Hornady bullets and limit myself to shots of 300 yards and less. My rifle is a Browning A-bolt with the Boss on it, cal. 25-06.
 

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as long as you stay with published data you'll be fine... if you can't tolerate that level of recoil then you'll need to take a step down in cartridge power.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thanks for the reply. It is just that I worry about the down loads as they leave air space in the cartridge.
Was wondering if that was safe. Do not want to have any exploding cartridges.
 

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25-06

I would move down to a smaller bullet. I load the 100 grain Hornady Inter lock. Works wonders on deer. I do not have my loads here at work but I load IMR 4350 and I am a couple of grains below max if memory serves me right. There is very little recoil.

My 7 year old shoots it and has no issues with recoil.

Darin
 

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You can use about 19 grs of IMR Trail Boss with a 100 gr bullet and achieve around 1700 ft per sec velocity in a 25-06. Hardly useful for 300 yard shooting, but think the mild recoil of it should be acceptable for your shoulder when shooting at shorter distances. This charge should fill most of case.
 

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the advice about using the 100gr bullet is good advice, if you want to use a tsx or gmx you can go even lighter and not give up penetration. i have used the 100gr barnes tsx in my 25/06AI and it is a good deer bullet, i believe that hornady's gmx for the 25 caliber is a 90gr pill and i'm sure it will work great... i haven't tried it in my 25 yet as i've got a few boxes of the barnes bullets on hand for it but i have shot the gmx in my 280 & 300wm and am very happy with the accuracy but i haven't taken any game with a gmx yet.
 

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Is H4895 listed in the manuals for 25-06? Hodgdon recommends using that powder for reduced loads, going down as low as 60% of maximum. They warn to NOT use H4895 if it isn't listed in published manuals for that particular cartridge. Go to their website and search for reduced or Youth loads.

I use it in .243 and 260 REM for the kids to use, and the 243 worked very well on a deer and a coyote so far.
 

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1st- didnt sound like any replies came from a doctor, let alone your doctor. Which means nobody hear knows how strong or weak your shoulder is but your doctor. If the doc says you can shoot then try a 1/2 load with a powder that fills 80 or so % or the case with a lite bullet.
 

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Welcome to ShootersForum, JKHunting! Rules are to be nice and join in.

Hodgdon published Youth loads for a dozen or so cartridges, but I don't see one listed for the 25-'06. ( http://www.hodgdon.com/PDF/Youth Loads.pdf )

What you might do is call them up and explain your situation. My guess is they will quote you a reduced load using H4895 and a light weight bullet. The 100gr Partition, loaded down to around 2500fps might be a very good option for deer and hogs, at ranges under 200 yards, or so.

I loaded up some 30-'06 rounds for my wife, with 125gr BT's and H4895. They did a good job on a smallish doe up in MI, back in November.
 

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Load a good 100gr. softpoint around 2,800 - 2,900 fps and you will do fine. That level of performance is what I load my .257 Roberts to. It has accounted for many a deer and pig.

Favorite bullets are the older Rem Core-Lokt, and discontinued Nosler Solid Base, but the nice thing about the lower velocities is that most soft points should do fine. I would probably start out with a Hornady Interlock if I had to pick something randomly off the shelf.....

Best of luck.
 

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r/h shooter

i busted my collar bone back in 69.i didnt download,but learn't to shoot left handed.-must say that at first the percieved recoil from my 30/06 was a good 50% more than the r/h shoulder.took about 50 to 100 rounds and brought federal rounds which are milder and soon adapted.-you would be surprised how quick you adapt.-lots of luck.--if all turns to s$$t,theres allways a pistol.
 

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25 load

Load a good 100gr. softpoint around 2,800 - 2,900 fps and you will do fine. That level of performance is what I load my .257 Roberts to. It has accounted for many a deer and pig.

Favorite bullets are the older Rem Core-Lokt, and discontinued Nosler Solid Base, but the nice thing about the lower velocities is that most soft points should do fine. I would probably start out with a Hornady Interlock if I had to pick something randomly off the shelf.....

Best of luck.
i would agree 100%-sound advice.-if you cant shoot that load,maybe a 222-22/250 maybe in order.
 

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Also consider Sierra 100 grain Pro-hunter. It's a low cost bullet that has a proven track record for me. I've used 'em in standard loadings from 35 feet to over 400 yards without any blowups or failures to pass thru. Minimal meat damage is a bonus. Recoil seems mild but I'm not the one with the sore shoulder.
 

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I have to 2nd the Sierra Prohunter. I do not load them in 25-06 but I do for 280 Rem and have in the 6mm Remington.

My suggestion was also to drop back to a 100 grain bullet.

Darin
 

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You'll have to do some load development which is the most difficult part, but the 100 grain Nosler Ballistic Tip is a very reliable bullet and with IMR4350 its very accurate.

I would not want to go below 1800 FPS with this bullet though as its not rated to expand properly. I'm not sure any big game bullet will be reliable below that threshhold.


http://www.nosler.com/Bullets/Ballistic-Tip.aspx
 

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Discussion Starter #16
To clear-up any misunderstanding. I did not just break my shoulder, I have had total shoulder replacement of my right shoulder. Shattered it completly and had to have all the bones removed. Now have a metal replacement in its place. Works pretty good, but shoulder is recoil sensitive. I have shot my wife's 243 and it was ok for me. It does have my reloads for it too. They are loaded with 100 grain Hornady bullets. I may see if I can make a load similar for my 25-06. Small bullets do worry me though. Where I pig hunt there are some very large ones now and then. 3 years ago someone had a picture in a local paper with a 1,050 pound boar, it was 10 feet long, took a scoop loader to come and get it and move to the guy's truck. Offspring of these monsters are out there and someone takes one now and then. That happens once every 3 to 4 years or so. Most there are the normal wild pigs of 200 to 300 pounds in farming country. Does anyone know of shot placement to the head that the 100 grain bullets will take a thick skulled pig cleanly? I very much belive in the one shot kill. Most shots at this place will be inside 200 yards. I no longer can climb trees so will have to hunt from a blind on the ground. Have bought two pop-up tent blinds that we can use when deer hunting and pig hunting. Wife has a 350 pounder and I have a 550 pounder hanging on the wall right now. Both were taken with one bullet each just behind the skull into the spine. Anyone hunt the wild pigs? And what head shots will take one down at once? With the little 100 grain bullets? Took another big one several years ago and had to shoot it twice with a 30-06 and 165 grain elk bullets. That is why the 100 grain bullets worry me. The lowest loading for the 100 grain bullets in my load books is 2900 fps. The lowest recommened loading for the 117 grain bullets is 2700 fps. Was thinking the 117 grain bullets would hold together better, if I can stand the recoil.
Thanks for any help.
 

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100 grain 25 cal.

Nosler Partition should do the trick. Barnes bullets seam to do well I hear. Not shot them in years.

A guy that got me into hunting took everything from Antelope to Moose with a 25-06. He used the 117 grain Hornady interlock. I now load for his gun. His son has it now since he passed away last year.

I shoot 100 grains because my gun does not shoot the 117 grains very well. I have not had shouler surgery but I do not notice the recoil at all. My 7 year old does not either.

I would not hesitate shooting a pig in the head with a 100 grain partition bullet or any other premium bullet. However, I would punch a hole thru the ribs instead of the head. You have a much bigger target and if you put it thru the heart or lungs it is a dead pig and he will not run very far. I would bet he would be he would stretch out pretty close to where he was shot.

I am not a head shot fan.

Darin
 

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To clear-up any misunderstanding. I did not just break my shoulder, I have had total shoulder replacement of my right shoulder. Shattered it completly and had to have all the bones removed. Now have a metal replacement in its place. Works pretty good, but shoulder is recoil sensitive. I have shot my wife's 243 and it was ok for me. It does have my reloads for it too. They are loaded with 100 grain Hornady bullets. I may see if I can make a load similar for my 25-06. Small bullets do worry me though. Where I pig hunt there are some very large ones now and then. 3 years ago someone had a picture in a local paper with a 1,050 pound boar, it was 10 feet long, took a scoop loader to come and get it and move to the guy's truck. Offspring of these monsters are out there and someone takes one now and then. That happens once every 3 to 4 years or so. Most there are the normal wild pigs of 200 to 300 pounds in farming country. Does anyone know of shot placement to the head that the 100 grain bullets will take a thick skulled pig cleanly? I very much belive in the one shot kill. Most shots at this place will be inside 200 yards. I no longer can climb trees so will have to hunt from a blind on the ground. Have bought two pop-up tent blinds that we can use when deer hunting and pig hunting. Wife has a 350 pounder and I have a 550 pounder hanging on the wall right now. Both were taken with one bullet each just behind the skull into the spine. Anyone hunt the wild pigs? And what head shots will take one down at once? With the little 100 grain bullets? Took another big one several years ago and had to shoot it twice with a 30-06 and 165 grain elk bullets. That is why the 100 grain bullets worry me. The lowest loading for the 100 grain bullets in my load books is 2900 fps. The lowest recommened loading for the 117 grain bullets is 2700 fps. Was thinking the 117 grain bullets would hold together better, if I can stand the recoil.
Thanks for any help.
Im guessing a 1000 lbs pig tastes like crap anyways so dont shoot that one. For everything else shoot a bonded or mono metal.
 

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Never been pig hunting but I bet there is something about a 1000 lb pig that says shoot me!!!
And I would want to secure him with one shot because I would not want that 1000 lbs of pig chasing me.

I would not hesitate shooting one in the ribs with a partition bullet out of a 25-06 even with a less than max load. It would take a **** of an animal to take it in the head and not die immediately.

My dad used to shoot pigs in the head with a 22 pistol before butchering. Some of them were big. Not 1000 lb big but nice sized ones. I would load up a few starting at minimum and just see how far you can go before you experience pain. Then shoot them into a block of wood and see how far they penetrate.

Darin
 
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