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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I recently purchased a Marlin 1895c in .357 mag/.38 spl. I want to start reloading for it. I have access to my father's Dillon press but all his manuals are out of date. Who makes the most comprehensive reloading manual?
 

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The Troll Whisperer (Moderator)
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My favorite is the Lyman 49th manual. Have most of the others, but its the first one I go to.

Welcome to the board, BTW.
 

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Owning most reloading manuals published in the last fifty years there data supports kbud advice. Personal observation is the Hornady manuals are at best very conservative. Most maximum loads will be up to couple grains lower than other manuals. Sierra manuals generally hit maximum loads expecially when compared too the VitaVhori manual although there latest has been cut back on some calibers/loads. Lee's manual appears too be a compilation of various sources pulled together into one book with bare information given as too test firearm. Lyman's manual lists both lead bullets as well as jacketed bullets. Very good for anyone who casts there own whether rifle or pistol caliber. Speer has limited amount of lead bullets listed mostly for those chamberings that may be used as pistol or rifle.

There's practically every concievable offering available dependant upon personal usage when it comes too load manuals.
 

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It depends. Most bullet manufacturers publish manuals that conveniently showcase every bullet they make with powders from a few different manufacturers. Most powder manufacturers publish manuals that showcase all their powders with bullets from a few different manufacturers.

Lyman, RCBS, Lee, and a few others have published manuals for loading cast lead bullets with powders from a few different manufacturers.

So it all depends on what you're after. Figure out what you'd like to start loading with and buy a manual that supports it. After you play around with that for awhile, you're going to branch out and try different things, and acquire more manuals in the process. It never hurts to get more manuals.

I bought the newest Hornady manual because they developed a special section on loading for the M1 Garand rifle specifically; it was a separate section from their normal .30-06 section (M1 data is different due to changes in standard pressures in the .30-06 cartridge over the last 70 years). Yep, I bought a two-inch thick manual for those two pages :) It was worth it!
 

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By the way, you chose a very nice rifle. I have a soft spot for Marlin lever guns, probably because I shoot SASS. Give SASS some thought - it's the most fun you can legally have with your pants on!
 

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Gone off to enjoy his twilight years
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The bullet has such a profound effect on pressure that the bullet maker's book ought to be your primary source of load data. Mistakes and typos do happen, so crosscheck that data with info from the powder maker. If there is any discrepancy, resolve the issue with the Lyman book.

I would not use one bullet maker's data with a different brand of bullet because of the risk of having an over-maximum load due to bullet construction.
 

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The bullet has such a profound effect on pressure that the bullet maker's book ought to be your primary source of load data. Mistakes and typos do happen, so crosscheck that data with info from the powder maker. If there is any discrepancy, resolve the issue with the Lyman book.

I would not use one bullet maker's data with a different brand of bullet because of the risk of having an over-maximum load due to bullet construction.

+1...

I would pick a bullet maker and get their manual.

Then as you change bullet brands you will have a nice collection of manuals... that you will have to refresh every few years... :)

BTW

I do like the Hornady Manual… and most of their bullets but I don’t know much about their .357 bullets
 

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unbiased?

Most manuals published by bullet manufactures are biased towards their own bullets. I prefer manuals from powder manufactures. I like Lyman as they list multiple powder/bullet manufactures. I really like the "One Book/One caliber" manuals which focus on one caliber and list data from many sources for one caliber. http://www.loadbooks.com
shootmup
 

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Crud. I tried to post a reply but the board choked. It probably contained that one word that causes the server to freeze. If anybody can remind me what that word is, I'll edit it out of my answer.

Darn frustrating thing, that.
 

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The Hog Whisperer (Administrator)
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One from the bullet manufacturer - your favorite brand, if no other way to make the choice. There will be tidbits about bullet performance and other useful information. Sadly, I have quite a few "favorite" bullets and ended up with a shelf full of them. Not a bad thing but the beginner doesn't need to spend on an entire library.

Cross-check with the powder manufacturer. The trend seems to be for the data to go on-line, as an example check the Hodgdon site which now has data for the Hodgdon branded powders, IMR branded powders, and Winchester .... so there's 3 for the price of, well, nothing.

A book like the Lyman is a good sanity check, and has good info on cast bullets and reduced loads that you might not find anywhere else.

Assuming access to online info from the powder manufacturers, that really leaves you with two books to get started. Not bad for a hobby that lasts a lifetime. I'd pick up the hardcopy of the powder manufacturer when you can, if it isn't online.

There are other useful books, such as the ABCs of Reloading, that are more about technique than data. Good stuff for the beginner.

Hope that helps.
 

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The Hog Whisperer (Administrator)
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Crud. I tried to post a reply but the board choked. It probably contained that one word that causes the server to freeze. If anybody can remind me what that word is, I'll edit it out of my answer.

Darn frustrating thing, that.
"F r o m" but I think that Nick had an issue with 'table,' once. I've hit the 'f r o m' problem more than once.
 

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Well duh, shootemup. Of course bullet companies only test their own products. Alliant doesn't test Hodgdon powders, either.

When powder makers test for load data, they will use a selection of bullets in a given weight and publish load data for the bullet that generated the highest pressures. The theory is that other bullets will generate lower pressures with that load data, and therefore be safe. However, as there can be as much as 10,000 psi difference between the highest and lowest pressure spread with different bullets (even of the same weight), you might be getting significantly less performance than possible.

Bullets vary quite a bit, but powders don't. Acme 3127 powder used by bullet company A to do their tests is going to be very close to the lot of Acme 3127 used by bullet company B to do their tests.

Bullet company data should be your primary source. Crosscheck with powder company data. If there's a major discrepancy, verify with an independent tester (Lyman).

Finally, the Lee book is fine, but they do NO testing. they merely copy data f-r-o-m others, both bullet and powder makers. Therefore, Lee is not a suitable independent source.

BINGO! f-r-o-m did it! Thanks Mike.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 · (Edited)
WOW! You folks are a font of information! It sounds like the Lyman manual is a very good thing to have.
I'll have to get the ABCs of Reloading also. I will check out the bullet and powder manufacturer websites and start ANOTHER hobby.
Thanks everyone.
Is there any reloading data available for the bullets advertised here?
 

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Elk Whisperer (Super Moderator)
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I have a collection of older Lyman manuals as well as an old Bellding and Mull along with a couple Hornadys and an RCBS. The old Lymans are a good read. TONS of info.

Like kdub said as well as others, the Lyman 49th is tops.

RJ
 

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I don't have the Lyman manual, but I do have Nosler, Sierra, and Speer that I use frequently and Alliant and Hodgdon guides that I primarily use for shotshell data. I like Nosler's No. 6 and its fitting because I use a lot of Nosler bullets.

Be aware that many of the freebie guides only list the max charges, and a few years ago the Ramshot one didn't bother to tell people that.
 
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