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Discussion Starter #1
Been reloading shotshecks for quite a while on a single stage MEC Sizemaster.  Want to get into pistol caliber reloading and maybe one or two other calibers (possibly rifle).  I'm not rich and I don't have a lot of excess time for the reloading bench but I do enjoy the process of reloading.  I know Lee isn't considered the Cadilac but I was looking at their new 4 die turret press. Also looking at the Redding Mod. 25 6die turret, the RCBS Rockchucker or if I save for awhile the RCBS Pro2000.  Any help would be appreciated.  I enjoy reading and learning about reloading as much as I do shooting.  I have a nice Ohaus 1000gr balance scale (Same as RCBS 10-10) and would like to get the Redding BR-3 powder measure, if I go single stage.  Any and all help would be appreciated.  Can't wait to get started!
 

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Beartooth Regular
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Welcome to Metallics 6gunr.

As for a good single stage press, this is a subjective thing to many people.

I have a Redding Ultra Mag that is about 10 years old. They will bury it with me when I head to the Reloading bench in the sky.

The quality of all the big names is excellent. I'd recommend a Turret press if you want to increase production a bit but aren't ready for a Progressive. I don't have any experience with the Lee Turret though.

I also have a CH H type press which is still available from CH/4D Die Company. I also have a few Lee Reloader presses. One is mounted next to my Ultra Mag for priming and decapping chores. They are so inexpensive at one time I lined up about 4 of them on a block of wood and used them to reload pistol calibers at a surprising production rate. Each press for an operation!

I've also owned an RCBS Rockchucker and Reloader Special, Redding Turret (an absolute tank of a press!) and a Hornady Projector and lastly a Dillon Square Deal Progressive. All were excellent presses.

Decide what you are trying to do and the speed you need and the money you want to spend and go from there.

Regards, Ray
 

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To 6gunr: I have used a rockchucker for many years but have found that the Forester Co-Ax press is the best single stage press on the market, in my opinion! It is a little spendy but a beautiful press that will last two lifetimes. I paid about 190.00 for mine, a rockchucker is quite a bit less. Your scale sounds like a good one. I think one of the new electronic powder dispensers and scale would really speed up production just short of a progressive. Just my .02 cents worth.

God Bless

Chris
 

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Reloading presses sem to grow on my bench.  I started with Herter's C presses owned by my father.  Then came a Rockchucker (still used) followed by a couple others for quicker production and finally a Dillon 550B.  The Dillon is used for higher volume reloading.  Single stage loading is with the Rockchucker and a garage sale find from Bonanza (O frame type).  Start with the Rockchuker and you'll be happy..
 

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I've been watching this post to see what will come of it.

Not much different than the advice I would offer.

Progressives are nice, and turret presses convenient.  Although I'm impressed with many of Richard Lee's innovative ideas, I'm not enthralled with his loading presses.  Yes I know that lots of people use them with perfect satisfation, but I prefer the solid feel of a steel press!

If just starting out, I would suggest a solid "O" frame single stage press to begin with on your loading bench.  Even if you do go to a progressive later on, there is still a decided need for a single-stage press in your equipment no matter what else you progress to.

Pick a good one, a solid frame type such as the Rockchucker, the Orange Crusher or similar heavy steel press.

Dive in, and you'll never look back!   You won't save money, but you'll shoot more and have loads more fun!

God Bless,

Marshall
 

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Beartooth Regular
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The RCBS Rockchucker has one limitation. It's ram stroke is too short for loading the long Sharps and British cartridges. Bonanza, Lyman and Redding give you another 3/4". Handloader's Digest (overdue for a new edition) gives the stroke for most presses.

Bye
Jack
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Gents appreciate your words of wisdom and recommendations.  Have decided on either the Rock Chucker or the Redding Mod 25 Turret (6 die).  Favoring the Redding with Redding dies and a BR-3 powder measure.  Anyone use the Redding Turret much.  Is the extra cost worth little bit extra time saved and convenience?  Thanks.  Scot
 

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All I can say is the Redding is probably the strongest turret press out there bar none. It has six positions which means you could keep two sets of dies mounted and adjusted. You could do bullet swaging on it.

The Rock Chucker is a great strong press also.

You'll have to decide which way you want to go. If you are loading pistol, I'd go with the turret. If you want total speed, go with a progressive.

If you want to load both rifle and pistol but yet save some time on die setup, go with the turret. If you are into making up only small lots of ammo either rifle or pistol and time is not a factor, go with a single stage.

These presses aren't cheap but will last you the rest of your days. Shop around for the best price. As they say in the NFL, you make the call.

Best of Luck
 

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6gunr,


I think that Redding products, while good gear, are too pricey for what they offer versus other manufacturers. Your first idea of a Lee Turret is a good one, if you load for several cartridges at one time. The convenience of changing a turret head with all dies in place is nice. I've had one of the 3-hole versions for at least ten years. Untold tens of thousands of rounds have been made with it. I also have a Rockchucker that gives equally good service, albeit with die changes.

If you load for bottleneck rifle cartridges and are using bolt actions or single shots, I also <i> highly </i> recommend Lee's Collet Dies. They are excellent and have made the most accurate loads in several cartridges for me when compared to the same rounds made with RCBS, Hornady, or Redding die sets.
 

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Hi, 6 gunr!

Like most all of us reloaders, starting out simple has helped us all to 'hone' our skills.  As we realize the benefits of loading our own and see the differences in our 'groups', it just gets more fun which leads to the desire of shoot more, etc.  After 35 years of this joy, I've just recently sprung for the RCBS Progressive 2000.  So far it's been a great reloader!  I guess the features I like about it the most is the fact you can remove/insert a cartridge at any location or stage at anytime.  You can 'back up' if necessary and check your work as you go.  The powder dump is great and won't dispense powder if there's no case in position- no time-consuming clean-ups!  I really like the '5 position' die layout compared to the Dillon 550-  you can add a 'speciality' die.  The die-holder let's you change calibers quickly w/o having to readjust dies, etc.  When used with an electronic scale, ( I use a Pact scale and dispenser) you can set your own pace.  Another wonderful feature is the Priming system- APS- works great and no handling of primers one-at-a-time!  Spendy- yes, (&#36320+) but after all these years of taking a hour to load 50 rounds, I can't believe how quickly you can get out shooting and enjoy the fruits of your shortened hours at the reloading bench.  My thought would be to get the basics to get reloading-  simply, then save-up for one of the fine 'progressives'.

Best wishes in your decision making!

H&H
 

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Hi 6gunr,

I have 2 single stages, a Rockchucker and a Lyman Crusher. I bought the Rockchucker new and found the Lyman at a yard sale for 10 bucks. IF I had to buy another single stage I'd buy the Lyman Crusher for 3 reasons.

1) It has a bigger opening
2) It bolts to the bench with 3 bolts not 2, (it feels more solid on my bench)
3) It can be found at a lower price than the Rockchucker. Look around and you can find the Crusher II for around 75 bucks.

I also have a Dillon 650 and it is superb. The Redding turret is an intriguing press...I might need one....just in case the 3 others on my bench spontaniously combust.....yeah thats the ticket.....

Nah, she'd never believe that.

Good luck
 

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"Bad Joke Friday" Dan (moderator emeritus)
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6gunr,

I've used the Redding 6 hole turret for about three years and love it. I typically use three slots for one caliber and the other three slots for another caliber. And have an additional turret top that only takes a few minutes to change if you want to leave more than two calibers set up. While I use the Dillon progressives for loads I've tested and settled on, I use the turret for smaller runs when I'm experimenting with powder changes, etc..

I've not used the Lee turret, but have had several of their progressive presses and have had continuing problems with several functions, thus am not enamored with the Lee product.

As many of the other posts have indicated, most of the various manufacturers will give you your money's worth.

Hope you enjoy the revolver shooting, certainly a challenging and rewarding sport.

Dan
 
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