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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello,

If anyone has reloaded 9mm cartridges for the Sig Sauer P210 Target pistol, would you please share your reloading recipes? I know that each gun is unique and trial-and-error is needed to find the load that works best in a gun, but it would be helpful to me to have some recipes to start with that are know to work well in that model.

Thank you.
 

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The Shadow (Moderator)
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it would be helpful to me to have some recipes to start with that are know to work well in that model.
Those are pronounced "starting loads" in every reloading manual.
"Known to work well with that model" is like asking what we think your wife would like, based on hair color.
 

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Elk Whisperer (Super Moderator)
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Yeah, please buy a reloading manual and read it's "How To" sections or check out the various powder manufactures web sites for "recipes". Only your pistol can tell what it likes.

You're pretty new here and your background isn't known to us, so we're trying to help, not sound like we're cutting you down.

RJ
 
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I have to side with the OP on this one. The 9mm isn't normally a "target" round and I for one wouldn't know which bullet to start with or powder for accuracy (all my 9mm loads for 3 pistols are either near min. or hefty "SD" loads, and have been reloading since '69 and 9mm for only 25 years). I do not post load data and pay no attention to any load data on line, but a few hints on bullet weight/configuration and powder choice wouldn't hurt anything. Yes, reloading manuals are essential for reloading and regardless of his wife's hair color, some components are intrinsically more accurate than others (and the old "each gun is unique" is well overused). And nothing was mentioned about a lack of manuals or the OP's experience...
 

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The Troll Whisperer (Moderator)
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Well...……..here is a "well oversued" comment.


Any reloading offering found on the internet should be considered to have as much weight as the recommendatiions sponsored/listed by the soap, tool, car or otherproduct manufacturer.


If you can't check out loads listed in manuals or bullet/powder makers websites, don't solicit loadings from individuals which may or may not be safe in your particular firearm. How's that for well overused advice?
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Well...……..here is a "well oversued" comment.


Any reloading offering found on the internet should be considered to have as much weight as the recommendatiions sponsored/listed by the soap, tool, car or otherproduct manufacturer.


If you can't check out loads listed in manuals or bullet/powder makers websites, don't solicit loadings from individuals which may or may not be safe in your particular firearm. How's that for well overused advice?
Kdub: Before I posted my request I reviewed the Alliant, Hodgdon, and Hornady websites. I also own the Hornady Handbook of Cartridge Reloading book, 10th Edition, and the Lyman 50th Edition Reloading Handbook, and reviewed the material in those books. There are a great many possibilities for reloading 9mm cartridges, and I'm new to reloading 9mm. I've learned over the years to ask others who have done the same or similar things the simple question, "What has worked best for you?". Not being a complete idiot, I will of course compare their opinions against the information from the sources I listed above. I don't see how asking other people their opinions is a mistake, and I have gotten some very helpful responses. I do see how narrow minded criticism is a mistake, no matter how well intentioned.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Based on the replies, I suppose I should supply some background to my request for reloading recipes. In previous posts I made on other web sites I had the feeling that providing too much background had the result that people stopped reading the post or ignored most of it. I can't blame them. But, being new to this forum I can also see why my question might lead you to wonder what types of mistakes I might make with your responses.

I have some experience with reloading, although I am not an expert by any stretch of the imagination. I have reloaded .44 magnum handgun, .17 hornet and .223 rifle, 28 gauge shotgun, and soon will be adding 9mm handgun and .410 shotgun. I have less than zero interest in personal defense and combat topics, so 9mm and .223 weren't even on my list of things to try until recently. After years of reading about the accuracy of .223 loads and the "assault" rifles often associated with them, I decided to try reloading .223. When I purchased a CZ bolt action rifle in .17 Hornet, I purchased the same model rifle in .223 to be able to somewhat compare the cartridges more than the rifles. I had a similar interest in 9mm, but it seemed to me like it would be a very inaccurate round. I saw a .17 Hornet load with 10 grains of powder and a 20 grain bullet, and compared it to a 9mm load with 5 grains of powder and a 115 grain bullet, and thought, "this is meant to hit a person at 5 - 10 yards, not for distance or accuracy". And all of the 9mm pistols I saw were for personal defense or police use.

But then I came across a couple of 9mm pistols that were "target" pistols, one being the Sig Sauer P210 Target pistol. The reviews of the P210 were excellent, and gave me some hope that it would be a good target pistol at 25 yards, perhaps as much as 50 yards (I'm not interested in shooting at less than 25 yards). But it seemed to me that the majority of the loads I would find would be designed primarily for the purposes of personal defense or combat situations, and would not be the best choices for accuracy when shooting at targets at 25 yards or more. So I thought I would ask other owners of the same model of pistol what reloading recipes have worked for them. While I know that each gun will achieve different results, if enough people are experiencing good results with certain types of loads, that would be helpful information to me to reduce that time and effort required to find the best load(s) for my specific pistol.

In closing, I should say that I would not be looking at any of the rifle or handgun rounds I mentioned above if it were not for reloading. I'm not interested in purchasing factory ammo. In reloading I learn not only what recipes work for my guns, but with additional research I learn more about how the shells work, how the guns work, and why some recipes may work better than others for similar guns. I like to learn, and it is a continuous and never-ending process.
 

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The Hog Whisperer (Administrator)
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bhr, don't sweat the caution. There's just a ton of 'suspect' info floating around on various sites.... some of which might be useful, some of which is scary :eek: My guess is a better question to ask is, what bullets might this gun like? I would be willing to bet that the type bullet will make more of a difference than the type of powder. There are so many powders you could use in a 9mm, you could probably spend the rest of your life testing them all. Just pick one and go with it. Good luck and let us know how it goes.
 

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The Hog Whisperer (Administrator)
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I was composing while you were, so let me add a few other things. First, loading for a semi-auto means you have to find a bullet that will feed reliably. Sigs are pretty good guns, so it may not matter, but it might. Overall length can be touchy with semi-autos, as well. Last, you don't want to batter the gun to death. Are they set up for light target loads, or need full throttle? Maybe someone knows... for my practice rounds for semi-auto guns, I just want them to reliably cycle, without flinging the brass into the next county, and feed reliably of course. Most of the rest of the accuracy question is generally on the shooter not the gun when it comes to handguns though ;)


You can always try a variety of inexpensive 9mm loads to get a starting point as to what the gun 'likes.'
 

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Since you have manuals to cross-check against, you are likely well-prepared to spot a 9×23 Winchester load misremembered by somebody as being a 9mm Parabellum. I won't worry about this in your instance.

As a starting point and for any pistol in general, a round-nose ball bullet is the least likely to present feed or cycle problems and is a good way to break a gun in. This is true of handloads and commercial ammunition. If you look at military ball specs for that bullet shape, the Hornady 115 grain FMJ (sometimes available in bulk at a discount) seated to 1.1" COL and fired with a load of 4.7 grains of either Hodgdon HP38 or Winchester 231 (same powder, OBP231 from St. Marks, but with different branding) happens to hit military 115 grain ball velocity from a 5 inch tube, so it is pretty representative of ball powder, though the military uses a somewhat slower powder. HP38/231 is economical and easy to meter and fairly versatile in common pistol cases. I've run a lot of it through 45 Auto, in particular, but have loaded .380 for my spouse's gun with it as well. It's what I would begin with. However, Hornady, which recommends that 1.100" COL for that bullet in 9 mm Luger, says 4.1 grains is the starting load and 4.7 grains is maximum. Other sources let you use more. I've generally found Hornady book loads to be on the light side, but not always. I think the lighter maximums occur because Hornady tries to hit velocities in fixed steps for their listings, so they stop increasing charge when they can't make the next step without going over pressure, and not simply when the pressure limit is reached. Nonetheless, I would work up to it. It just takes a few minutes to load up from the bottom in steps that are about 2% of the maximum (0.1-grain steps in this instance). And then you have just 7 loads to shoot in order while watching for pressure signs and failures to function.

Once you have established that and made it work and, unless the gun is already broken in, after you have about 500 rounds of those through it, that is when I would start branching out into other bullet profiles that interest you. 231 will give you normal maximum velocities for all of them. If you want to get to higher extra power factor loads, then you'll want to go to something a bit slower, like Power Pistol, but until that happens, this will break you in and not give you any problems with metering. The 231 is very popular for target work, so it will also shoot lead for you if you decide to go that direction. It is a bit dirty in low pressure 45 Auto loads, but the higher 9 mm pressures will help burn that out.

The only caution is to watch out for double-charges as it is possible to have them with 231/HP38. You want to be sure you have looked down in every case, every time before a bullet goes in. Even on a progressive press, you want to have light located to let you see down in to every passing charged case.
 
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Hello,

If anyone has reloaded 9mm cartridges for the Sig Sauer P210 Target pistol, would you please share your reloading recipes? I know that each gun is unique and trial-and-error is needed to find the load that works best in a gun, but it would be helpful to me to have some recipes to start with that are know to work well in that model.

Thank you.
Try a 147 gr bullet loaded to 1,000 ft/sec but not more (still subsonic) and you should have good performance on paper as well as gongs. Regarding propellant loads? Simply do the normal process of finding a load for your handgun that cycles properly. Accuracy is with you, not the pistol or load - the SIG and Glock, CZ 75 and S&W M&P are all accurate by design.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Since you have manuals to cross-check against, you are likely well-prepared to spot a 9×23 Winchester load misremembered by somebody as being a 9mm Parabellum. I won't worry about this in your instance.

As a starting point and for any pistol in general, a round-nose ball bullet is the least likely to present feed or cycle problems and is a good way to break a gun in. This is true of handloads and commercial ammunition. If you look at military ball specs for that bullet shape, the Hornady 115 grain FMJ (sometimes available in bulk at a discount) seated to 1.1" COL and fired with a load of 4.7 grains of either Hodgdon HP38 or Winchester 231 (same powder, OBP231 from St. Marks, but with different branding) happens to hit military 115 grain ball velocity from a 5 inch tube, so it is pretty representative of ball powder, though the military uses a somewhat slower powder. HP38/231 is economical and easy to meter and fairly versatile in common pistol cases. I've run a lot of it through 45 Auto, in particular, but have loaded .380 for my spouse's gun with it as well. It's what I would begin with. However, Hornady, which recommends that 1.100" COL for that bullet in 9 mm Luger, says 4.1 grains is the starting load and 4.7 grains is maximum. Other sources let you use more. I've generally found Hornady book loads to be on the light side, but not always. I think the lighter maximums occur because Hornady tries to hit velocities in fixed steps for their listings, so they stop increasing charge when they can't make the next step without going over pressure, and not simply when the pressure limit is reached. Nonetheless, I would work up to it. It just takes a few minutes to load up from the bottom in steps that are about 2% of the maximum (0.1-grain steps in this instance). And then you have just 7 loads to shoot in order while watching for pressure signs and failures to function.

Once you have established that and made it work and, unless the gun is already broken in, after you have about 500 rounds of those through it, that is when I would start branching out into other bullet profiles that interest you. 231 will give you normal maximum velocities for all of them. If you want to get to higher extra power factor loads, then you'll want to go to something a bit slower, like Power Pistol, but until that happens, this will break you in and not give you any problems with metering. The 231 is very popular for target work, so it will also shoot lead for you if you decide to go that direction. It is a bit dirty in low pressure 45 Auto loads, but the higher 9 mm pressures will help burn that out.

The only caution is to watch out for double-charges as it is possible to have them with 231/HP38. You want to be sure you have looked down in every case, every time before a bullet goes in. Even on a progressive press, you want to have light located to let you see down in to every passing charged case.
Thank you for the reply. The information will be very helpful, and I appreciate your sharing of your reloading experiences, that's something you can't get from the books. I have a progressive loader, but I haven't decided if I will use it or a single stage loader for 9mm. I just feel somewhat leery about loading a round where a 1 grain difference in a power charge is a 20% - 25% increase. But obviously many people safely reload 9mm with progressive loaders. Maybe I'll start with single stage than switch to progressive once I am more comfortable with it.
 

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Thank you for the reply. The information will be very helpful, and I appreciate your sharing of your reloading experiences, that's something you can't get from the books. I have a progressive loader, but I haven't decided if I will use it or a single stage loader for 9mm. I just feel somewhat leery about loading a round where a 1 grain difference in a power charge is a 20% - 25% increase. But obviously many people safely reload 9mm with progressive loaders. Maybe I'll start with single stage than switch to progressive once I am more comfortable with it.
Certainly you are on the right track for the 9mm pistol, bhr - and it does take a while to build the confidence in a progressive loader. Having said that - once it is set up and tuned properly and if you shoot a lot you will appreciate it.
 

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I've tried lots of different powders in 3 different 9mm pistols. I found they all liked a medium-fast powder better than the fast powders. So, Unique or Universal are what I use. I use W-231 in .45, but it doesn't work so well for 9.

The fast powders seemed to have too narrow a gap between the minimum powder to cycle the action and the maximum allowable to avoid overpressure signs. The medium powders were more forgiving.

So, I'd say look in the mfrs' load data for loads in that powder burn rate range.

Good luck!
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
I've tried lots of different powders in 3 different 9mm pistols. I found they all liked a medium-fast powder better than the fast powders. So, Unique or Universal are what I use. I use W-231 in .45, but it doesn't work so well for 9.

The fast powders seemed to have too narrow a gap between the minimum powder to cycle the action and the maximum allowable to avoid overpressure signs. The medium powders were more forgiving.

So, I'd say look in the mfrs' load data for loads in that powder burn rate range.

Good luck!
Thank you.
 
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