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Discussion Starter #1
Gentlemen,

A buddy of mine asked me to load him some black bear bullets for his 7400 Remington 30-06 Autofeeder. I haven't loaded for autoloaders, and I know based upon my expirience with the M-16s, that there are some powders, some charges, some bullet weights, etc, that really are not compatibile. For instance, my brother in law, also a 7400 shooter, gave me a box of trophy bonded bear claws, that stated on the side of the box, "not for automatics".

My 06 bear load is a 220 grain semi-spitzer nosler over max Nosler charge of Re22. I can feel the difference in recoil in my turnbolt, and that makes me wonder if that be too hard on his auto. What do you all think?

ALso, I understand the need to full length size, but was wondering about crimping. I can do a roll crimp easy enough, but you know these premium bullets, don't normally have a cannelure. Is crimping necessary? is this a Lee Factory crimp die area? Please advise.

Thanks for the help.

Steve
 

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The Hog Whisperer (Administrator)
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Steve,

If the powder burn rate is incorrect, you can pull case heads off in a Rem auto.... bolt tries to open too soon.... my dad had this happen with some 180 gr. bullets using IMR 4350. Not overloads, the pressure curve wasn't right, too much gas pressure when the bullet passed the ports. Same load shot perfectly in our bolt guns, very accurate, actually.

If you are going to reload, I'd stay with powders in the burn range of 4064 or 4895, single-base stick powders, faster than 4350. Bullets... perhaps 165 or 180 grains. With the faster powders, the pressure curve should be correct.

I'd personally use a 165 gr. Partition, just work up loads with suitable powder, see what shoots accurately.

Honestly..... give some thought to a plain old yellow/green box of Rem 180gr Cor-Lokts... generally available off the shelf and should do the job fine. Sometimes we get carried away with our reloading efforts when there is an inexpensive box of factory ammo that will do the job, especially if it's for a non-reloader who needs advise.

Shouldn't have to crimp if neck tension is correct, my dad has never crimped any ammo for his Rem autos and has not had any problems, with suitable loads. Shouldn't hurt, either.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Mike,

Excellent info, thanks so much.

You know, I remember seeing something like that happen about tens years ago. I guy I know was shooting an FN49, 8mm, and he had the case head come apart on him. I thought until now it was a slam fire, but he was shooting old mid east made military ball, and got a little bit of it blown back in his face. Nothing in his eyes, (although he was not wearing glasses), but little bitty brass flecks in his face, which was covered in black soot.

He had this astonished, hurt look on his face, and the crows feet in the corners of his eyes looked like big white stars. After we made sure he wasn't bleeding out, we did laugh at him -quite allot actually, as he looked like a cartoon character.

We had just thought the rifle had not gone all the way into battery, and the firing pin fell, which is possible, I guess. But it happened just as you have described.

I do some Barnes 165 Xers, and a good supply of 4064, so I may try to hook the guy up. I'll tell him the FN49 story, and make sure he is wearing shooting glasses.

thanks again,

Steve
 

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The Troll Whisperer (Moderator)
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Also, the semi-auto and the pump type centerfires require the use of SMALL BASE reloading dies to assure proper chambering. Sometimes, regular FL dies will not size the case down far enough for reliable feeding.

Most 'brush guns' such as the 7400 are meant to stabilize the heavier bullets. Don't think I'd load anything less than the 165 grainers in the 30-06 for best accuracy. The 180's always did best when I reloaded for a friend's rifle - recognizing that each rifle may like a different loading.
 

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The Hog Whisperer (Administrator)
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Steve,

The 165gr "X" is a good choice. Not all rifles will shoot the 'X' well, so if it doesn't work don't be surprised. My experience with them has been mostly positive, some very small groups, and once in a while, 6" groups with a barrel that doesn't 'like' them.

Barnes recommends at least 0.050" jump to the rifling. This can be a little tricky to measure in a semi-auto (or pump) gun. Just make sure they aren't jammed into the rifling. Make up a dummy round to the max length of the magazine, and let the bolt slam it into the chamber, and check carefully for rifling marks. Adjust seating dies as necessary. I think tht my RCBS seating dies use a 1-28 thread on the seating stem, so you get about 0.035 with each full turn of the seating stem (not the die body locking nut which is 1-14 or ~0.070" per revolution). If you have another brand this may be different.

My dad never had to use small base dies, but if your reloads won't chamber, could be the cause, as noted above. If you are shooing new brass or some which has only been fired in that gun you should not have a problem.

Also, keep in mind that the "X" is longer than a normal bullet, and takes up more powder space. Use data for that bullet if possible, and work up carefully. Staying a grain or two below max won't hurt the end results, anyway.

You can't force a crimp into the 'X' with the seating dies so don't even try.

If it's accurate, should be a dandy load and make that Remington into a real bear-thumper.
 
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